diff -u: Intel Design Flaw Fallout

For weeks, the world's been talking about severe Intel design flaws affecting many CPUs and forcing operating systems to look for sometimes costly workarounds. more>>

It’s Here. The March 2018 Issue of Linux Journal Is Available for Download Now.

Boasting as many pages as most technical books, this month’s issue of Linux Journal comes in at a hefty 181—that’s 23 articles exploring topics near and dear to everyone from home automation hobbyists to Free Software advocates to hard-core hackers to high-level systems architects.


diff -u: Linus Posting Habits

A look into how, when and why Linus posts to the kernel mailing list. more>>

diff -u: Automated Bug Reporting

Bug reports are good. Anyone with a reproducible crash should submit a bug report on the linux-kernel mailing list. The developers will appreciate it, and you'll be helping make Linux better! more>>

Google Chrome's Ad Filtering, Intel Expands Bug Bounty Program, GNOME 3.28 Beta and More

News briefs for February 15, 2018.

Starting today, Google Chrome will begin removing ads from sites that don't follow the Better Ads Standards. For more info on how Chrome's ad filtering will work, see the Chromium blog. more>>

ZFS for Linux

Presenting the Solaris ZFS filesystem, as implemented in Linux FUSE, native kernel modules and the Antergos Linux installer. more>>

diff -u: Adding Encryption to printk()

When is security not security? When it guards against the wrong people or against things that never happen. A useless security measure is just another batch of code that might contain an exploitable bug. So the Linux developers always want to make sure a security patch is genuinely useful before pulling it in. more>>

diff -u: Detainting the Kernel

What's new in kernel development: detainting the kernel.

Note: this post has been updated with a response by Matthew Garrett. more>>

Meltdown/Spectre Status for Red Hat and Oracle

The Red Hat family of operating systems addressed Meltdown and Spectre in its v3.10 kernel quickly, but relied too much upon Intel's flawed microcode and was forced to revert from a complete solution. more>>

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