Getting Started with Rust: Working with Files and Doing File I/O

How to develop command-line utilities in Rust. This article demonstrates how to perform basic file and file I/O operations in Rust, and also introduces Rust's ownership concept and the Cargo tool. If you are seeing Rust code for the first time, this article should provide a pretty good idea of how Rust deals with files and file I/O, and if you've used Rust before, you still will appreciate the code examples in this article.

Study the Elements with KDE's Kalzium

I've written about a number of chemistry packages in the past and all of the computational chemistry that you can do in a Linux environment. But, what is fundamental to chemistry? Why, the elements, of course. So in this article, I focus on how you can learn more about the elements that make up everything around you with Kalzium. KDE's Kalzium is kind of like a periodic table on steroids. Not only does it have information on each of the elements, it also has extra functionality to do other types of calculations.

Android Low-Memory Killer--In or Out?

One of the jobs of the Linux kernel—and all operating system kernels—is to manage the resources available to the system. When those resources get used up, what should it do? If the resource is RAM, there's not much choice. It's not feasible to take over the behavior of any piece of user software, understand what that software does, and make it more memory-efficient. Instead, the kernel has very little choice but to try to identify the software that is most responsible for using up the system's RAM and kill that process.

Webinar: Operationalizing DevSecOps

In this webinar, Twistlock's James Jones and Linux Journal's Katherine Druckman discuss hardening your DevOps environments and processes. Topics covered: The keys to DevSecOps success Tangible benefits of DevSecOps Steps and tools involved with building, shipping, and running containers DevSecOps creates a feedback loop Seven steps to containers And more Register to watch this webinar on-demand: 

FOSS Project Spotlight: OpenNebula

OpenNebula recently released its latest version, 5.8 "Edge", which now offers pivotal capabilities to allow users to extend their cloud infrastructure to the Edge easily and effectively. Why OpenNebula? For anyone looking for an open-source, enterprise solution to orchestrate data-center virtualization and cloud management with ease and flexibility, OpenNebula is a fine candidate that includes: