Virtualization

FOSS Project Spotlight: Ravada

Ravada is an open-source project that allows users to connect to a virtual desktop. Currently, it supports KVM, but its back end has been designed and implemented in order to allow future hypervisors to be added to the framework. The client's only requirements are a web-browser and a remote viewer supporting the spice protocol. Ravada's main features include:

Kodiak Data's MemCloud

Scientists working with big data regularly confront the high cost of acquiring the computational power needed to push the boundaries and innovate in data science.

CloudBees, Inc.'s CloudBees Jenkins Enterprise

Modern IT departments are adopting continuous delivery (CD) and automating software pipelines to accelerate and scale their software development and delivery across environments. This means that CD platforms are now business-critical and need to be scalable, secure, stable and reliable.

FinTech and SAP HANA

During the past few years, FinTech has emerged as a startup realm that is growing astronomically. In 2015, the EU alone experienced a growth of investment in FinTech of more than 215%, according to a report by Accenture.

The Tiny Internet Project, Part III

In a previous article, I introduced the Tiny Internet Project, a self-contained Linux project that shows you how to build key pieces of the internet on a single computer using virtualization software, a router and free open-source applications.

The Tiny Internet Project, Part II

In the May 2016 issue (also available here), I introduced the idea of the Tiny Internet Project, a self-contained Linux project that shows how to build the key pieces of the public internet on a single computer using one or two old computers, a router and a bunch of Linux software.

Installing and Running a Headless Virtualization Server

In recent years, hardware virtualization has become commonplace in the computing industry and more available to end users. The idea behind it is a noble one. Why invest in allocating more server hardware and not utilize it to its full potential, when instead you can consolidate it all onto one or a few servers and share their resources?

Vagrant Simplified

I admit it, some tools confuse me. I know they must be amazing, because programs don't get popular by being dumb (well, reality TV, but that's another story). I have the same sort of confusion with Vagrant that I have with Wine, Docker, Chef and countless other amazing tools people constantly rave about. So in this article, I'm going to break down Vagrant into its simplest form.

Jailhouse

Because you're a reader of Linux Journal, you probably already know that Linux has a rich virtualization ecosystem. KVM is the de facto standard, and VirtualBox is widely used for desktop virtualization. Veterans should remember Xen (it's still in a good shape, by the way), and there is also VMware (which isn't free but runs on Linux as well).

Non-Linux FOSS: a Virtualized Cisco Infrastructure?

We're all familiar with the idea of virtualized computers. Not only are they a great way to better utilize resources in a server room, but they also allow you to create and destroy servers in the blink of an eye. That's perfect for a lab or training environment. Unfortunately, it's always taken a rack of actual hardware to create a training lab for Cisco hardware.

Linux Containers and the Future Cloud

Linux-based container infrastructure is an emerging cloud technology based on fast and lightweight process virtualization. It provides its users an environment as close as possible to a standard Linux distribution.

ConVirt: the New Tool in Your Virtual Toolbox

Virtualization is now a staple of the modern enterprise. As more and more shops switch to the virtual paradigm, managing those new virtual resources is a critical part of any deployment. For admins using Microsoft- or VMware-based hypervisors, powerful management tools are available to keep their virtual houses in order.

Introducing Vagrant

Have you ever heard the following? "Welcome to the team! Here's a list of 15 applications to install, the instructions are in the team room, somewhere.

Consolidate: Put Your Servers into a VirtualBox VM

Rather than installing a server, such as a web server, directly onto your main computer, why not install it in a VM? This sort of setup has a few advantages of security and convenience. These days, spreading resources out into the cloud is the in-thing, but consolidation is often underexploited. Hosting a server in a virtualizer such as VirtualBox is often a good approach for casual or occasional server needs on a home network.