gaming

Weekend Reading: Gaming

Games for Linux are booming like never before. The revolution comes courtesy of cross-platform dev tools, passionate programmers and community support. Join us this weekend as we learn about Linux gaming.   Crossing Platforms: a Talk with the Developers Building Games for Linux

The Gaming Issue of Linux Journal is Here!

Games for Linux are booming like never before. The revolution comes courtesy of cross-platform dev tools, passionate programmers and community support. Join us this month as we take a Deep Dive in to gaming. Deep Dive features:

Two Portable DIY Retro Gaming Consoles

A look at Adafruit's PiGRRL Zero vs. Hardkernel's ODROID-GO. If you enjoy retro gaming, there are so many options, it can be tough to know what to get. The choices range from officially sanctioned systems from Nintendo all the way to homemade RetroPie projects like I've covered in Linux Journal in the past. Of course, those systems are designed to be permanently attached to a TV. But, what if you want to play retro games on the road? Although it's true that you could just connect a gamepad to a laptop and use an emulator, there's something to be said for a console that fits in your pocket like the original Nintendo Game Boy. In this article, I describe two different portable DIY retro gaming projects I've built and compare and contrast their features.

Would You Like to Play a Linux Game?

A look at several games native to Linux. Don't worry, I'm not trying to get you to play Global Thermonuclear War, since as we all know, the only way to win is not to play. And we want to play. Okay, enough with the mandatory classic movie references.

Crossing Platforms: a Talk with the Developers Building Games for Linux

Games for Linux are booming like never before. The revolution comes courtesy of cross-platform dev tools, passionate programmers and community support. In the last five years, the number of mainstream games released for Linux has increased dramatically, with thousands of titles now available. These range from major AAA releases, such as Civilization VI and Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, to breakout indie hits like Night in the Woods

Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal

I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare.

Introducing Zero-K, a Real-Time Strategy Game for Linux

Zero-K is a game where teams of robots fight for metal, energy and dominance. They use any strategy, tactic or gimmick known to machine. Zero-K is a game for players by players, and it runs natively on GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows.

Gaming Like It's 1989

It's no secret that I love classic gaming. It seems like every other month, I write about an emulation project or some online version of a 1980s classic. The system that defined my youth was the Nintendo Entertainment System, or the NES. Its chunky rectangle controller and two-button setup may seem simple today, but back then, it was revolutionary.

Chasing Carrots' Pressure Overdrive

A "funky, four-wheeled shoot 'em up" is how independent game-developer Chasing Carrots describes its newest game release Pressure Overdrive for Linux, Mac OS, Windows and Xbox.

Heirloom Software: the Past as Adventure

Through the years, I've spent what might seem to some people an inordinate amount of time cleaning up and preserving ancient software. My Retrocomputing Museum page archives any number of computer languages and games that might seem utterly obsolete.

BeBop Sensors, Inc.'s Marcel Modular Data Gloves

In the fabric-embedded sensors space, all controllers need to be accurate and fast. "If latency is more than 6–8 milliseconds, you are out of the band", cautions BeBop Sensors Inc., maker of the new Marcel Modular Data Glove solution for virtual and augmented reality OEMs.

Gabriel Ford, Sadie Ford and Melissa Ford's Hello, Scratch!

In the new book Hello, Scratch! (published by Manning Publications), parents and kids work together to learn programming skills, but not in just any old way. They create new versions of old retro-style arcade games with the Scratch open-source visual programming language from the MIT Media Lab.

Android Candy: Exploding Kittens!

I don't very often play games. I know that seems odd, because I do often write about gaming. Honestly though, I very rarely actually take the time to play video games. Recently, however, there has been an exception to that rule.

My Childhood in a Cigar Box

I grew up in the 1980s. That meant we drank far too much Kool-Aid, and on Saturday mornings, we got up early to watch cartoons. It also was the heyday of arcades, but I lived in the ghetto of Detroit and couldn't afford quarters to play games. Plus, there were none anywhere near the neighborhood where I lived. For me, the first real video-game experience was the Atari 2600.

Full SteamOS Ahead!

Although its timetable may not always be ideal, Valve has come through for Linux users lately. Not only has it released a native Linux version of Steam (with many native games!), it also has expanded its Linux support as the basis for its standalone SteamBox. The first step toward a Steam-powered console is the operating system.