FOSS

FOSS Project Spotlight: Pydio Cells, an Enterprise-Focused File-Sharing Solution

Pydio Cells is a brand-new product focused on the needs of enterprises and large organizations, brought to you from the people who launched the concept of the open-source file sharing and synchronization solution in 2008. The concept behind Pydio Cells is challenging: to be to file sharing what Slack has been to chats—that is, a revolution in terms of the number of features, power and ease of use.

Weekend Reading: FOSS Projects

FOSS Project Spotlights provide an opportunity for free and open-source project team members to show Linux Journal readers what makes their project compelling.    FOSS Project Spotlight: LinuxBoot by David Hendricks Linux as firmware.

Copyleft Terms May Become Unenforceable in 11 Countries under CPTPP

The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) is an enormous (roughly 6,000-page) treaty between Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam that was signed in Chile on March 8, 2018. So far, only Mexico and Japan have ratified it. CPTPP is almost identical to the original TPP, which included those 11 countries plus the United States.

Linux Gets Loud

Exploring the current state of musical Linux with interviews of developers of popular packages. Linux is ready for prime time when it comes to music production. New offerings from Linux audio developers are pushing creative and technical boundaries. And, with the maturity of the Linux desktop and growth of standards-based hardware setups, making music with Linux has never been easier.

Is It Linux or GNU/Linux?

After putting this question to the experts, the conclusion is that no matter what you call it, it's still Linux at its core. Should the Linux operating system be called "Linux" or "GNU/Linux"? These days, asking that question might get as many blank stares returned as asking, "Is it live or is it Memorex?"

FOSS Project Spotlight: Ravada

Ravada is an open-source project that allows users to connect to a virtual desktop. Currently, it supports KVM, but its back end has been designed and implemented in order to allow future hypervisors to be added to the framework. The client's only requirements are a web-browser and a remote viewer supporting the spice protocol. Ravada's main features include:

Do I Have to Use a Free/Open Source License?

Open source? Proprietary? What license should I use to release my software? A few weeks ago I ran into a neighbor, whom I'll call Leo, while he was out taking his dogs to the park. Leo stopped me to ask about some software he's developing. "Hey, you do open source stuff for companies, right?" Leo asked. "Yeah, that's my freelance business. Do you need some help with something?"

Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal

I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare.

For Open-Source Software, the Developers Are All of Us

"We are stronger together than on our own." This is a core principle that many people adhere to in their daily lives. Whether we are overcoming adversity, fighting the powers that be, protecting our livelihoods or advancing our business strategy, this mantra propels people and ideas to success.

pfSense: Not Linux, Not Bad

Through the years, I've used all sorts of router and firewall solutions at home and at work. For home networks, I usually recommend something like DD-WRT, OpenWRT or Tomato on an off-the-shelf router. For business, my recommendations typically are something like a Ubiquiti router or a router/firewall solution like Untangled or ClearOS.

GIMP, More Awesome Than I Remember

For what seems like decades, GIMP (Graphic Image Manipulation Program) has been the de facto standard image editor for Linux. It works well, has many features, and it even supports scripting. I always have found it a bit clumsy, however, and I preferred using something else for day-to-day work.

How to Make Windows Better? Make It Chocolatey!

Once again, my friend and fellow Linux Journal club member Kris Occhipinti introduced me to an awesome bit of software. This time, it's an open-source project that brings Linux-like package management to Windows! Don't get me wrong; installing software on Windows isn't difficult, but it's definitely more cumbersome than with Linux.

Non-Linux FOSS: Mac2Imgur

I love to share images with people quickly. They could be cat photos or screenshots. Usually I post those silly images to Twitter and Facebook using Buffer, but occasionally, I just want to send a quick image to a single person. (This is usually when I'm trying to show my computer via screenshot.)