Cloud

Android Candy: Cloud Bonding

Although the title might sound like some new-fangled tech jargon, I'm actually referring to a fairly simple Android app called "Unclouded." If you're a Dropbox user who also has things stored in Google Drive, Unclouded is a single interface to multiple file syncing backends.

Not So Dynamic Updates

Typically when a network is under my control, I like my servers to have static IPs. Whether the IPs are truly static (hard-coded into network configuration files on the host) or whether I configure a DHCP server to make static assignments, it's far more convenient when you know a server always will have the same IP.

Synchronize Your Life with ownCloud

Like most families these days, our family is extremely busy. We have four boys who have activities and appointments. My wife and I both have our own businesses as well as outside activities. For years, we've been using eGroupware to help coordinate our schedules and manage contacts. The eGroupware system has served us well for a long time. However, it is starting to show its age.

Is the Private Cloud a Real Cloud?

Consider this traditional scenario: in today's competitive world, dynamic business requirements need flexible and rapid provisioning of IT resources. Along with flexibility, traditional IT environments need new resources to support the dynamic workloads of applications.

Linux Containers and the Future Cloud

Linux-based container infrastructure is an emerging cloud technology based on fast and lightweight process virtualization. It provides its users an environment as close as possible to a standard Linux distribution.

Command-Line Cloud: rss2email

In my last article, I started a series called Command-Line Cloud. The intent of the series is to discuss how to use the cloud services we are faced with these days without resorting to a Web browser. I spend most of my time on the command line, so that's where I'd most like to interface with cloud services.

Command-Line Cloud: gcalcli

If you follow my columns in Linux Journal, you probably are aware that I'm a big fan of the command line. When it comes to getting things done efficiently, most of the time the command line can't be beat.

Cloud Computing Basics—Platform as a Service (PaaS)

Generally, good programming is considered to be the measured application of an art form, craft or discipline, with the objective of producing a competent and evolving business solution. In traditional environments, computer programming is a practice that has multiple phases, such as designing, developing, testing, debugging and maintaining application code.

Introduction to OpenStack

What is OpenStack? You've probably heard of OpenStack. It's that cloud software that's getting a lot of attention from big names in the IT industry and major users like CERN, Comcast and PayPal. However, did you know that it's more than that? It's also the fastest growing open source community in the world, and a very interesting collaboration among technology vendors and users.

Own Your Data with OwnCloud

I love Dropbox. I really do. With a Google AdWords campaign, and $50 or so, I was able to max out my free storage. That means I have around 24GB of free Dropbox storage to fiddle with. Granted, that's a lot, but in the grand scheme of things, 24GB isn't very much space.

When a Shell Isn't Enough

Not long ago, I wrote about how awesome it is to have shell access on a remote server. I still hold to that notion, but I received a lot of feedback on the issue.

Everpad

It seems as though all the cool kids are addicted to Evernote. I'm not quite that cool, but I have been trying hard to convert to a paperless lifestyle. Evernote admittedly is a great tool for archiving information. When I bought my Nexus 7, I also bought a subscription to Evernote Premium.

Finally, "The Cloud" Means Something

Few jargonistic terms have annoyed me as much as, "The Cloud." When the term was first coined, its meaning was ambiguous at best. For some companies, it meant shared web hosting (but with a cooler sounding name). For others it was simply, "let us host your servers in our datacenter, which we now refer to as a cloud."