News

First Draft of HTML 5 Is Out

In a landmark move towards updating the foundation of the internet, yesterday the World Wide Web Consortium released the first draft of the HTML 5 specification — the first extensive upgrade to HTML since 1997.

Yahoo Plans to Chop the Workforce

There was a time when Yahoo! was on top of the world. Then along came a startup called Google, and things started to slide. Apparently, the slide has finally reached the forest, and the company is resorting to the axe to bring things under control.

Study Finds Cellphones Hazardous to ZZZ's

If you're tired and grumpy, it may well be the fault of cell phones. No, not that everyone everywhere — from the grocery store to the golf course — is talking on one, as maddening as that is.

RIAA Gets Comeuppance Via Hacker

As a general rule, the perpetrators of website hacking wouldn't be classified as custodians of the greater good, however, on occasion they may well do a public service. Such appears to have been the case over the weekend, when a series of attacks brought the RIAA's website to its virtual knees.

Facebook Runs Afoul of UK Privacy Regulators

The social networking community is beginning to look beleaguered, with many of the top social sites besieged with user, legal, and PR troubles. Now Facebook finds itself back in the hot-seat, with news that UK regulators are concerned about the site's privacy practices.

Just Say No...To DHS?

It's not every day that a U.S. state decides to declare a federal law non-applicable. It was, however, Friday when the Governor of Montana decided to do just that, and to bring seventeen other states along with him, over — of all things — drivers licenses.

Microsoft Takes Spyware to a New Level

Dateline: Redmond. A Microsoft employee sits in his office, sweating. Suddenly, a robotic overload explodes through the door, accuses the terrified worker of fraud, and expels him from the building, based on the obvious guilt identified by his sweating. The broken air conditioner in the room is overlooked, because nobody programmed it into the overlord's system. Far-fetched? Probably. However, it's a lot more possible than it was a week ago, with the news that Microsoft has submitted plans to the Patent and Trademark Office for a system that would provide all-encompassing data about workers.

It's Just Not a Good Week to be Myspace

Myspace is one of the most popular social networking sites in the world, and with that popularity comes a lot of attention. Unfortunately for the site, much of the attention this week has been focused on controversy and crime.

Mattel, Hasbro Pull the Plug on Facebook Fun

Playing with toys isn't always fun, as users of the popular social-networking site Facebook found out with the news that the owners of Scrabble — toy manufacturers Mattel and Hasbro — have requested that a popular Scrabble-like application be removed from the site.

Options Tamperer Gets Harshest Sentence Yet

The former CEO of networking manufacturer Brocade, Inc. was hit with the strongest sentence handed down to date in the ongoing trials of Silicon Valley executives caught falsifying company records to boost stock option payoffs.

Oracle Picks up BEA for $8.5 Billion

If news days follow themes, then today's theme is acquisitions, as Oracle has announced their intent to buy BEA Systems, Inc. for $8.5 billion, the second billion-dollar acquisition of the day.

Apple Debuts Envelope-Sized Laptop

The last few days — indeed, the last few weeks — have been filled with much speculation over what Steve Jobs would produce as Apple's newest and neatest offering during his "Stevenote" at the Macworld exposition. He certainly didn't disappoint.

MySQL's Future is Looking Sun-y

Buying an open-source offering is the hot thing in Silicon Valley these days, and Sun Microsystems doesn't want to be left out. According to today's announcement, Sun will be picking up the open-source database company MySQL AB for a cool $1 billion.

Intel in Hot Water with New York

While Intel — the world's leading microprocessor manufacturer — is facing investigations by the European Commission, South Korea, and Japan over it's trade practices, the U.S. has been a relative safe haven. That's all changed, with the announcement last week that New York State will begin an investigation into whether the company's competition tactics against AMD went too far.

European Commission to Investigate Microsoft...Again.

Sometimes, it seems like some people just won't learn from the past. Such appears to be the case with Microsoft, as the European Commission announced this week that they will begin another investigation into Microsoft's anti-competition practices, just months after having closed the last.

SCO v. Novell to Hit Utah in April

First there was The Rumble in the Jungle. Then came the Thrilla in Manila. Now it's time for the Wake in Salt Lake, as the trial in SCO's infamous lawsuit against Novell has been set for April 29th, and may well be the death knell for the failing company.

KDE 4.0 Hits the (Virtual) Shelves

KDE fans, now is the time you have been waiting for! The long-awaited, eagerly-anticipated, it's-going-to-knock-your-socks-off-when-it-gets-here KDE 4.0 is now available.