Weekend Reading: Ansible

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I've written about and trained folks on various DevOps tools through the years, and although they're awesome, it's obvious that most of them are designed from the mind of a developer. There's nothing wrong with that, because approaching configuration management programmatically is the whole point. Still, it wasn't until I started playing with Ansible that I felt like it was something a sysadmin quickly would appreciate.

Part of that appreciation comes from the way Ansible communicates with its client computers—namely, via SSH. As sysadmins, you're all very familiar with connecting to computers via SSH, so right from the word "go", you have a better understanding of Ansible than the other alternatives.

With that in mind, I've written a few articles exploring how to take advantage of Ansible. It's a great system, but when I was first exposed to it, it wasn't clear how to start. It's not that the learning curve is steep. In fact, if anything, the problem was that I didn't really have that much to learn before starting to use Ansible, and that made it confusing. For example, if you don't have to install an agent program (Ansible doesn't have any software installed on the client computers), how do you start?

Ansible, Part I: the Automation Framework That Thinks Like a Sysadmin

How to get started with Ansible. Shawn tells us the reason Ansible was so difficult for him at first was because it's so flexible with how to configure the server/client relationship, he didn't know what he was supposed to do. The truth is that Ansible doesn't really care how you set up the SSH system; it will utilize whatever configuration you have. This article will get you set up.  

Ansible, Part II: Making Things Happen

Finally, an automation framework that thinks like a sysadmin. Ansible, you're hired.

Ansible is supposed to make your job easier, so the first thing you need to learn is how to do familiar tasks. For most sysadmins, that means some simple command-line work. Ansible has a few quirks when it comes to command-line utilities, but it's worth learning the nuances, because it makes for a powerful system.

Ansible, Part III: Playbooks

Playbooks make Ansible even more powerful than before.

To be quite honest, if Ansible had nothing but its ad-hoc mode, it still would be a powerful and useful tool for automating large numbers of computers. In fact, if it weren't for a few features, I might consider sticking with ad-hoc mode and adding a bunch of those ad-hoc commands to a Bash script and be done with learning. Those few additional features, however, make the continued effort well worth it.

Ansible, Part IV: Putting It All Together

Roles are the most complicated and yet simplest aspect of Ansible to learn.

I've mentioned before that Ansible's ad-hoc mode often is overlooked as just a way to learn how to use Ansible. I couldn't disagree with that mentality any more fervently than I already do. Ad-hoc mode is actually what I tend to use most often on a day-to-day basis. That said, using playbooks and roles are very powerful ways to utilize Ansible's abilities. In fact, when most people think of Ansible, they tend to think of the roles feature, because it's the way most Ansible code is shared. So first, it's important to understand the relationship between ad-hoc mode, playbooks and roles.

Shawn is Associate Editor here at Linux Journal, and has been around Linux since the beginning. He has a passion for open source, and he loves to teach. He also drinks too much coffee, which often shows in his writing. You can contact Shawn via e-mail, ljeditor@linuxjournal.com.

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