Tor's Strength in Numbers Campaign, New ask.krita.org Site, Kodi Announces Limited-Edition Raspberry Pi Case, IPFire 2.21 Core Update 125 Released, and Chrome and Firefox Developers Plan to End Support for FTP

News briefs for November 27, 2018.

Tor announces its Strength in Numbers campaign: "Stand up for the universal human rights to privacy and freedom and help keep Tor robust and secure." For #GivingTuesday, another donor will match first-time donations to the project—this is in addition to the existing matching donations from Mozilla, so if you donate, your gift will be matched twice. Go here to donate.

Scott Petrovic and the KDE sysadmin team have launched ask.krita.org—the "Krita Question and Answers Site". The new ask.krita.org "is a place where it's simple to find out if your question has been asked before, simple to ask a question, and simple to answer a question. It's a central place where, we hope, Krita users will get together and help each other. Like a stackoverflow site, or like ask.libreoffice.org.

Kodi recently released a new limited-edition "Kodi Edition" Raspberry Pi case. This version 2 of the case Kodi released two years ago is newly designed, aluminum, but it's "now gone to the dark side with a metallic, jet black coating for that cool Vader look". In addition, "the second-generation case features better access to the SD card, a better built-in heatsink, precision manufacturing, and subtle details that make a great case amazing." A percentage of every sale of this case goes to the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. You can order one from FLIRC for $19.95.

IPFire 2.21 Core Update 125 was released yesterday. This update has various bug and security fixes, along with new features, such as "the IPFire Access Point add-on now supports 802.11ac WiFi if the chipset supports it" and the dehydrated "lightweight client to retrieve certificates from Let's Encrypt written in bash". You can download it from here.

Chrome and Firefox developers plan to end support for FTP. BleepingComputer reports that "an upcoming change in how files stored on FTP servers are rendered in the browser may be the first step in its ultimate removal", and also that "Google developers have advocated for the removal of FTP support in Chrome for over 4 years" due to its low usage and the additional attack surface it creates that Chrome is unable to secure properly, compared to offering the same files over an HTTPS connection.

Jill Franklin is an editorial professional with more than 17 years experience in technical and scientific publishing, both print and digital. As Executive Editor of Linux Journal, she wrangles writers, develops content, manages projects, meets deadlines and makes sentences sparkle. She also was Managing Editor for TUX and Embedded Linux Journal, and the book Linux in the Workplace. Before entering the Linux and open-source realm, she was Managing Editor of several scientific and scholarly journals, including Veterinary Pathology, The Journal of Mammalogy, Toxicologic Pathology and The Journal of Scientific Exploration. In a previous life, she taught English literature and composition, managed a bookstore and tended bar. When she’s not bugging writers about deadlines or editing copy, she throws pots, gardens and reads. You can contact Jill via e-mail, ljeditor@linuxjournal.com.

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