git

A Git Origin Story

A look at Linux kernel developers' various revision control solutions through the years, Linus Torvalds' decision to use BitKeeper and the controversy that followed, and how Git came to be created.

Building a Bare-Bones Git Environment

How to migrate repositories from GitHub, configure the software and get started with hosting Git repositories on your own Linux server. With the recent news of Microsoft's acquisition of GitHub, many people have chosen to research other code-hosting options. Self-hosted solutions like GitLabs offer a polished UI, similar in functionality to GitHub but one that requires reasonably well-powered hardware and provides many features that casual Git users won't necessarily find useful.

Git Your July 2018 Issue of Linux Journal: Now Available

Along with Microsoft buying Github recently, we received hundreds of questions and comments about all things git. How does one install and run GitLab themselves? Should they? What's the difference between GitHub and GitLab? How can one migrate repositories from GitHub and host on their own Linux server? So with this July issue of Linux Journal, we take a Deep Dive in to... git. Enjoy! Feature articles include: A Git Origin Story by Zack Brown

Terrible Ideas in Git

This article was derived from a talk that GitHub Universe faithfully rejects every year. I can't understand why.... For better or worse, git has become one of the Open Source community's more ubiquitous tools. It lets you manage code effectively. It helps engineers who are far apart collaborate with each other. At its heart, it's very simple, which is why the diagram in so many blog posts inevitably looks something like the one shown in Figure 1. The unfortunate truth that's rarely discussed in detail is that git has a dark side: it makes us feel dumb. I don't care who you are—we all hit a point wherein we shrug, give up and go scrambling for Stack Overflow (motto: "This thread has been closed as Off Topic") to figure out how best to get out of the terrible situations we've caused for ourselves. The only question is how far down the rabbit hole you can get before the madness overtakes you, and you begin raising goats for a living instead.

Microsoft Buys GitHub: Three Weeks Later

I heard that Microsoft would be buying GitHub just a couple days before it happened when Carlie Fairchild at Linux Journal told me about it. I replied to the news with a solid, “Get! Out!” Needless to say, I had my doubts. As someone who remembers all too well the “Embrace, extend and extinguish" days of Microsoft, the news of this latest embrace did, however briefly, bring back those old memories.

Brent Laster's Professional Git (Wrox)

More than 40% of software developers use the massively popular software development tool Git as their primary source control tool. Those new to the Git fold who are looking for a professional, up-to-date guide to get them rolling have a new resource in Brent Laster's new book Professional Git.

Non-Linux FOSS: Git Yer Tortoise On!

Git has become the most popular version-tracking platform around for open-source projects. Whether you're using GitHub, Gitorious, Bitbucket or similar, or even if you're hosting the git repository yourself, accessing the code is something us Linux users take for granted.

Git - Revision Control Perfected

In 2005, after just two weeks, Linus Torvalds completed the first version of Git, an open-source version control system. Unlike typical centralized systems, Git is based on a distributed model. It is extremely flexible and guarantees data integrity while being powerful, fast and efficient.