GitLab

Take Your Git In-House

If you're wary of the Microsoft takeover of GitHub, or if you've been looking for a way to ween yourself off free public repositories, or if you want to ramp up your DevOps efforts, now's a good time to look at installing and running GitLab yourself. It's not as difficult as you might think, and the free, open-source GitLab CE version provides a lot of flexibility to start from scratch, migrate or graduate to more full-fledged versions.

Git Your July 2018 Issue of Linux Journal: Now Available

Along with Microsoft buying Github recently, we received hundreds of questions and comments about all things git. How does one install and run GitLab themselves? Should they? What's the difference between GitHub and GitLab? How can one migrate repositories from GitHub and host on their own Linux server? So with this July issue of Linux Journal, we take a Deep Dive in to... git. Enjoy! Feature articles include: A Git Origin Story by Zack Brown

Microsoft Buys GitHub: Three Weeks Later

I heard that Microsoft would be buying GitHub just a couple days before it happened when Carlie Fairchild at Linux Journal told me about it. I replied to the news with a solid, “Get! Out!” Needless to say, I had my doubts. As someone who remembers all too well the “Embrace, extend and extinguish" days of Microsoft, the news of this latest embrace did, however briefly, bring back those old memories.

Back Up GitHub and GitLab Repositories Using Golang

Want to learn Golang and build something useful? Learn how to write a tool to back up your GitHub and GitLab repositories. GitHub and GitLab are two popular Git repository hosting services that are used to host and manage open-source projects. They also have become an easy way for content creators to be able to invite others to share and collaborate without needing to have their own infrastructure setup.