Cookies That Go the Other Way

The web—or at least the one we know today—got off on the wrong hoofs. Specifically, I mean with client-server, a distributed application structure that shouldn't subordinate one party to an other, but ended up doing exactly that, which is why the web today looks like this:

Generating Good Passwords, Part I

Dave starts a new method for generating secure passwords with the help of 1Password. A while back I shared a script concept that would let you enter a proposed password for an account and evaluate whether it was very good (well, maybe "secure" would be a better word to describe the set of tests to ensure that the proposed password included uppercase, lowercase, a digit and a punctuation symbol to make it more unguessable).

Speeding Up Netfilter (by Avoiding Netfilter)

Imre Palik tried to speed up some of Linux's networking code but was met with stubborn opposition. Essentially, he wanted networking packets to bypass the netfilter code unless absolutely necessary. Netfilter, he said, was designed for flexibility at the expense of speed. According to his tests, bypassing it could speed up the system by as much as 15%.

Everything You Need to Know about the Cloud and Cloud Computing, Part II: Using the Cloud

How to get started with AWS, install Apache, create an EFS volume and much more. The cloud is here to stay, regardless of how you access data day to day. Whether you are uploading and sharing new photos with friends in your social-media account or updating documents and spreadsheets alongside your peers in your office or school, chances are you're connecting to the cloud in some form or another.

Is It Linux or GNU/Linux?

After putting this question to the experts, the conclusion is that no matter what you call it, it's still Linux at its core. Should the Linux operating system be called "Linux" or "GNU/Linux"? These days, asking that question might get as many blank stares returned as asking, "Is it live or is it Memorex?"

Read-Only Memory

Igor Stoppa posted a patch to allow kernel memory pools to be made read-only. Memory pools are a standard way to group memory allocations in Linux so their time cost is more predictable. With Igor's patch, once a memory pool was made read-only, it could not be made read-write again. This would secure the data for good and against attackers. Of course, you could free the memory and destroy the pool. But short of that, the data would stay read-only.