Problems with Ubuntu's Software Center and How Canonical Plans to Fix Them

Ubuntu has received a lot of flack from the community for some of its commercial projects. Placing Amazon ads in Unity's Dash is a classic example of a poorly planned move that flies in the teeth of the community's ethos. A community built on the concepts of freedom and software that empowers the user (instead of some commercial concern) would never take that well. more>>

Huge Package Overhaul for Debian and Ubuntu

Debian and Ubuntu are moving to update all C++ packages with GCC5, which was released in April. GCC stands for Gnu Compiler Collection, and it is used to convert source code to executable code and libraries. These compilers are used to build everything from the Linux kernel to user applications, so it's a far-reaching change. more>>

The Controversy Behind Canonical's Intellectual Property Policy

In the world of FOSS, a small change to a license can be a big deal. For users of proprietary software, changes in the EULA are hardly even registered. Those users click "Ok" and forget about it in the blink of an eye. They have accepted that they are severely limited as far as their rights to alter or redistribute the software is concerned. more>>

Urgent Kernel Patch for Ubuntu

Linux is engineered with security in mind. In fact, the most fundamental security mechanisms are built right in to the kernel itself, which makes it extremely hard for malicious code to bypass. more>>
Ubuntu Snappy Core for Cloud

A More Stable Future for Ubuntu

Canonical has announced plans to switch all versions of Ubuntu to its new Snappy package manager. The new tool offers the promise of greater stability and security for the system and applications. more>>

Ubuntu Ditches Upstart

On April 23, 2015, Ubuntu version 15.04 (code-named Vivid Vervet) was released. This is an important release, although superficially it looks much the same as the previous version. The real difference is "under the skin", as Ubuntu switches from the Upstart init system to systemd. more>>

Ubuntu & SUSE & CentOS, Oh My!

Ubuntu & SUSE & CentOS, Oh My!

It's Halloween week, and the big names in Linux are determined not to disappoint the trick-or-treaters. No less than three mainline distributions have released new versions this week, led by perennially-loved-and-hated crowd favourite Ubuntu. more>>

More PXE Magic

In this article, I've decided to follow up on a topic I wrote about not in my column directly, but as a feature article called "PXE Magic" in the April 2008 issue. more>>

ZevenOS - Does it recapture the flavor of BeOS?

BeOS was a much loved and highly advanced desktop operating system that ceased active development in 2001. ZevenOS is a Ubuntu 11.10 based system (with a bit of help from Xubuntu) that attempts to recapture some of the BeOS look and feel. more>>

Talking Point: Should Distros Stick to CDR Size?

It's starting to look like the end of an era for Ubuntu users as Canonical mull the creation of an ISO that won't fit onto a CDR. The question is, does it matter? more>>

Ubuntu Tweak 0.6 Enters beta

There are a wealth of changes which can be made to an Ubuntu system that sit in a category that is half way between the obscure and the genuinely useful. Ubuntu Tweak is utility that exposes these options with a handy GUI. more>>

Books Lens

If you are an Ubuntu user and a fan of the new Unity interface, you might be interested in a new lens in development by David Callé. The Books Lens provides a real-time search interface for e-books. It currently interfaces with Google Books, Project Gutenberg and Forgotten Books. By the time you read this, that list probably will have grown. more>>

Distro Spotlight: Bodhi Linux

Small, fast, light and easy to customize - we’ve heard it all before - but I’d say that Bodhi Linux has enough individual character to warrant consideration. more>>

YAAAUU (Yet Another Article About Ubuntu Unity)

 I tried.  I really did.  I tried to like Ubuntu’s new Unity interface and tried hard to make it work. Unity felt ok on the Acer Netbook -- the small screen is a good match for the new vertical application launcher. more>>

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