kernel

NVMe over Fabrics Support Coming to the Linux 4.8 Kernel

The Flash Memory Summit recently wrapped up its conferences in Santa Clara, California, and only one type of Flash technology stole the show: NVMe over Fabrics (NVMeF). From the many presentations and company announcements, it was obvious NVMeF was the topic that most interested the attendees. more>>

Doing for User Space What We Did for Kernel Space

I believe the best and worst thing about Linux is its hard distinction between kernel space and user space. more>>

What's the Kernel Space of Democracy?

No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.—Winston Churchill more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Sometimes it's necessary to change function semantics inside the kernel, and then find and update all users of that function to match the new semantics. Such changes can result in huge patches going into the source tree, affecting hundreds of files. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

The OOM killer is a tough nut to crack. How can a system recover when it's violently thrashing and out of RAM? Once upon a time, you'd just have to reboot. And today, that still might be necessary, but less so, because the OOM killer attempts to identify and stop the process that seems to be causing the hangup. The problem is, it may not choose the right process every time. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

There's an ongoing impulse among a diversity of developers to be able to compile some or all of the Linux kernel as a library, so that a piece of software could use kernel services and APIs while running under a different kernel entirely, or a different operating system. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Linux capabilities are one of the more fluid and less defined regions of kernel development. Linus Torvalds typically has no trouble violating POSIX standards if he sees a better way of doing something. In the case of filesystem capabilities, however, there's no standard to violate. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

The NMI (non-masking interrupt) system in Linux has been a notorious patchwork for a long time, and Andy Lutomirski recently decided to try to clean it up. NMIs occur when something's wrong with the hardware underlying a running system. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Over time, memory can become more and more fragmented on a system, making it difficult to find contiguous blocks of RAM to satisfy ongoing allocation requests. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Boot times can become slow on systems with many CPUs, partly because of the time it takes to crank up all the RAM chips. Mel Gorman recently submitted some patches to start up RAM chips in parallel instead of one after the other. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Linus Torvalds reported on some GCC compiler warnings that he felt were unnecessary, and he gave his opinion on how they should work instead. Specifically, GCC 5.1 would issue a warning against using a switch statement with a boolean variable, presumably because a boolean would be better handled by a simple if statement. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

There's a slow effort underway to allow virtually any part of the kernel to be extracted into its own shared library, thus enabling users to use any alternative subsystem they please. There's a long history of this, going back to the debate between micro-kernels and monolithic kernels. more>>

Linux Kernel 4.1 Released

Version 4.1 of the Linux kernel was released this week, and it includes a number of new features in the following areas. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

When you run a program as setuid, it runs with all the permissions of that user. And if the program spawns new processes, they inherit the same permissions. Not so with filesystem capabilities. When you run a program with a set of capabilities, the processes it spawns do not have those capabilities by default; they must be given explicitly. more>>

Urgent Kernel Patch for Ubuntu

Linux is engineered with security in mind. In fact, the most fundamental security mechanisms are built right in to the kernel itself, which makes it extremely hard for malicious code to bypass. more>>
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