Almost 9 Distros in Almost 6 Minutes

Ubuntu has gotten the spotlight recently here at Linux Journal, but this week Shawn shows us a handful of other Linux distributions.

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Very interesting

uçak bileti's picture

Have read all of the posts and watch video. Very interesting and much better disciplined than most sessions. and thank you for information.

uçak bileti

uçak bileti's picture

Thank you again.

Have read all of the posts and watch video. Very interesting and much better disciplined than most sessions. and thank you for information.

re:

Etek alti's picture

+1

Great video.

dış cephe's picture

Great video.Thanks a lot.

Linux Puppy

KINGOFEVERTHINGMYWIFEALLOWS's picture

I wish you would spend less time on Ubuntu and more time on the smaller distros. Puppy Linux has so many "flavors" that there is literally something for everyone. You only looked at the basic edition. You should look at PCPuppyOS(citrix client included), MacPup, BuddaPup - comes with enlightenment, and VIZ CE just to start with. I have tried most distros and while some of it is personal preference, there is also the objective reality of what just works. I have a couple of older machines that nothing else will run on except for DSL and Puppy. I am currently running the Pupeez version on an old Dell Optiplex GXMT 5166 with 128 RAM with much success. DSL is very complicated for a newbie. I like DSL but Puppy is just easier to use. Puppy is unique in that it is not a derivitive of another large distro. I do not have a vested interest in promoting Puppy other than I like it so there. I ORDER you to do a special feature on the small distros. Slax also has a couple of nice ones.

Puppy Linux

xaer0knight's picture

it such a fast OS but lacks the robustness of packages ... i uses Puppy Linux as my backup/restore Distro :L)

Gentoo...

James Ausmus's picture

Hahaha - you've nailed Gentoo on the head. ;)

I'm a die-hard Gentoo fan, but it's certainly not for the weak-hearted (or for those who don't find watching endless compilations scrolling by entertaining), but it's a great choice out there for those who want to *have* to know a lot about Linux and their system. :)

Thanks for the reviews!

-James

Wow you guys need to give

Diego's picture

Wow you guys need to give Shawn a break. So he didn't try Fedora, so what. He didn't say he would try to top 9 distros by popularity or anything. So he doesn't know that a year ago Fedora came out with Live CDs, well it's not exactly the end of the world now, is it? The Linux world offers up TOO MANY distros to keep track with them all.

Many choices for Linux

QuickFox's picture

It's cool that there's many choices for Linux. :) I use Ubuntu via Wubi, before that I used Knoppix, the Live CD distribution. I actually had lots of fun exploring and using that Linux distribution. Who knew so much software and an operating system can be squeezed into a 700 MB CD.

Love the humor at the end and that BSOD joke. I agree it never gets old. :D

Gentoo does take forever

Gentoo User's picture

Its a lot of fun to setup, and you learn a ton about Linux, but I agree it takes forever, but its worth it. It makes me a bit more careful about messing with things, because I don't really want to do it all over.

Sabayon Linux

C.'s picture

Based on Gentoo, Sabayon Linux it's a great distribution...

See, I *knew*

Shawn Powers's picture

I knew Gentoo people would take the harassing well. :)

My first Gentoo experience was actually on a really old iMac. For the record, X11 compiling on a 233mhz PPC processor is a bit masochistic!

And I kid you not, we had a power outage on the 4th day of compiling. It was so horrible I couldn't do anything but laugh. ;)

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

FRICKIN CAPTCHAS SUCK

Anonymous's picture

Back in the day it took one full week to compile the base system for my router/server on an old *486* toshiba satellite laptop running at a whopping *75* MHz. I think it took about 3-4 days just to compile gcc. :-) But even though it took forever to build, that thing hummed along quite nicely for about five years until a power outage and subsequent power spike when they turned the power back on killed it for good. R.I.P., crow. :-(

Of course nowadays we have stage3 liveCDs to obviate such needless pain and suffering. :-) Still, it isn't for everyone and that's OK too. ;-)

Boy, oh boy

Another Gentooer's picture

Back in the day it took one full week to compile the base system for my router/server on an old *486* toshiba satellite laptop running at a whopping *75* MHz. I think it took about 3-4 days just to compile gcc. :-) But even though it took forever to build, that thing hummed along quite nicely for about five years until a power outage and subsequent power spike when they turned the power back on killed it for good. R.I.P., crow. :-(

Of course nowadays we have stage3 liveCDs to obviate such needless pain and suffering. :-) Still, it isn't for everyone and that's OK too. ;-)

weenie :)

element-o.p.'s picture

You are griping about compiling X on a 233 MHz PPC? Weenie :)

While working at an ISP several years ago, I was given a Whistle Interjet that was going to be scrapped. I built FreeBSD on it (couldn't get Linux to boot for some reason), and compiled X from source tarballs. The Whistle Interjets use *486DX* processors, but I can't remember if they are 33MHz or 66MHz. Talk about painful...

PCLinuxOS and Mint

lapubell's picture

a cool note that I didn't hear you mention about PCLinuxOS is that it uses apt for package management. Makes an RPM based distro feel much more comfortable for users of debian based systems like me.

Another side note, Linux Mint is great for non techie types. My girlfirend is a great example of a happy Linux user because of her Minty computer.

What happened to Fedora?

Anonymous's picture

What happened to Fedora?

Honestly

Shawn Powers's picture

Honestly, it was only a matter of download size. I opted to pick distros that fit on a single CD.

I'd love to do them all, but there are lots of distros out there!

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

You should be fired for that

Anonymous's picture

You should be fired for that response. Have you ever heard of Fedora Live CDs that can be installed to the hard drive?

Nope

Shawn Powers's picture

Never heard of a wonder broom either. There goes my custodial job...

I'm actually glad to know Fedora has a live CD now. They didn't for a very long time. Thanks for the tip wrapped in what I can only hope was sarcasm.

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

Fedora live cds have been

Anonymous's picture

Fedora live cds have been installable since Fedora 7. It wasn't sarcasm, you're the "associate editor" of a Linux site and you didn't even know that one of the most popular distros has a live cd that is installable.

Maybe if you didn't focus so much on ubuntu, you would know this. (That's not sarcasm either).

This comment indicates one

Anonymous's picture

This comment indicates one thing only: you really dont know anything about the whole software area, where everyday all around the world lots of people are producing new stuff. I for one never ever thouched 'your' fedora dist since i saw Linus posting in comp.sources - not enough time to see them all.

The funny side -and reason why i'm wasting time for this answer- is: why is it, that those who barely know nothing are so often offensive and and unfriendly? Maybe out-of-bounds error in package limited_view?

RE: Fedora

Anonymous's picture

I'm glad you didn't show Fedora. I've heard that it sucks ass, and that everyone who likes it is a little cry-baby-bunting with no sense of humour. Well, that's what I heard anyway.

My experiences with its

Anonymous's picture

My experiences with its early releases made me give up on Fedora--it just seemed to never work right.

Then, when Fedora 8 came out, someone told me that he was happily using it, and that Fedora had improved dramatically over the years. That's why I decided to give Fedora another try, and I must say that Fedora really does work a whole lot better than it used to do. I can certainly understand that people like it enough to make it their preferred distro!

Well, following your

Anonymous's picture

Well, following your thinking i can say the same thing of others distros. Do not talk about you don't know.

Hehehe nice video. I like it

Torres's picture

Hehehe nice video. I like it :)

Fedora

Anonymous's picture

Just about every intro to Linux I have ever seen shows Fedora. Who cares if Shawn decided to skip it. Regardless of what distro you like the most you have to admit that Fedora gets tons of attention.

Hey Linux Journal CAPTCHA SUCKS

Webinar
One Click, Universal Protection: Implementing Centralized Security Policies on Linux Systems

As Linux continues to play an ever increasing role in corporate data centers and institutions, ensuring the integrity and protection of these systems must be a priority. With 60% of the world's websites and an increasing share of organization's mission-critical workloads running on Linux, failing to stop malware and other advanced threats on Linux can increasingly impact an organization's reputation and bottom line.

Learn More

Sponsored by Bit9

Webinar
Linux Backup and Recovery Webinar

Most companies incorporate backup procedures for critical data, which can be restored quickly if a loss occurs. However, fewer companies are prepared for catastrophic system failures, in which they lose all data, the entire operating system, applications, settings, patches and more, reducing their system(s) to “bare metal.” After all, before data can be restored to a system, there must be a system to restore it to.

In this one hour webinar, learn how to enhance your existing backup strategies for better disaster recovery preparedness using Storix System Backup Administrator (SBAdmin), a highly flexible bare-metal recovery solution for UNIX and Linux systems.

Learn More

Sponsored by Storix