Gnome or KDE, which is the one true desktop?

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Hehehehe. No fair and saying IceWM or Xfce. C'mon now, we want a blood feud here. :)

Gnome for Me

Arcticfoxx-Alopex's picture

I dont think i can judge really. I have been using linux for about a month now. and i have to say I'm loving it... When it comes to GNOME and KDE i couldn't compare... because GNOME is all i know. But what i can say is that i most definitely find GNOME user friendly, and very business like... It has its sparkles and cool graphics but from what I've seen and read i dont think it can compare to KDE. Also, by analysing the programs in the repositories... looking at ratings, number of programs etc, for some reason KDE seems more popular. I guess the people are speaking when they download so much :) this could be a bit biased because also each repository carries different info (from what i understand...) but here in cuba, it seems to be alot more loved
I guess thats my 2 euros 4 carlie lol

Arcticfoxx-Jamaican in Cuba

GNOME

baillio2's picture

I have been through both, and for some reason I just fell in love with GNOME. I like how it is different than the labored 'Windoze' motif. I enjoy GNOME, but I admit I still use KDE apps on occasion. At first I was a bit miffed at the GNOME philosophy of 'one app for one function'. So I have a few KDE apps that I enjoy using that do multiple functions. However, I'm slowly adapting the GNOME philosophy for my own, and I like it.

KDE.

carlie's picture

It's just so intuitive. When I'm introducing others to Linux for the first time, they tend to do better with a KDE intro (perhaps because it's more Windoze-like, which I know spurs an entirely other and somewhat-justifiable argument that I'll try to bow out of gracefully now).

Gotta love SuperKaramba's widgets (yes just like gDesklets, I know) as well as Koffice and Konqueror.

My 2 cents. (Hm, wonder if I should convert those to Euros.)

KDE Works for Me(so far)

Mike Roberts's picture

I tried earlier versions of gnome because someone told me with my Sun Solaris background I should like it better. I didn't and have been happy with KDE ever since. Like Carlie posted, KDE is intuitive. I don't mind the thrill of the chase and my job requires quite a bit of that. I just don't want to chase around for desktop apps or utilities.

However, I was a bit annoyed that when I installed Kubuntu 7.10 last week and KDE installed with dolphin as the default file manager instead of Konqueror. I read many posts justifying dolphin as the default file manager, many of which seemed reasonable. Regardless, I don't like dolphin in its current form. Many posts say it is easy to reset Konqueror to the default file manager. The only thing that worked for me was apt-get remove dolphin. I'm happy again with KDE.

KDE developers, if you are reading, please make it easy to switch between Konqueror and dolphin or others might opt out like I did and never try dolphin.

Mike Roberts is a bewildered Linux Journal Reader Advisory Panelist.

KDE

fantastron's picture

I love KDE. But:

sudo apt-get remove dolphin

I don't like it either. I think it is the "Gnomified" KDE File Manager. We are not the only ones out there. Have a look at http://www.kde-forum.org/forum/55/KDE-4-Brainstorm.html.

KDE

hwiz's picture

KDE is my preferred desktop environment too. I tried GNOME back in Ubuntu Breezy Badger, but changed shortly after. KDE just has more of the features that I like, and is very customizable and intuitive.

By the way, Mike, you should really try Krusader for file manager. It's an orthodox file manager like Norton Commander and Total Commander (Windows) and generally gives you a lot more control than the standard file managers in KDE :).

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