Typing Nonstandard Characters on Ubuntu

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Typing characters that are not standard in English can be done quite easily in [Ubuntu] Linux without any modifications. In most situations, you can do this by using the Character Map utility included in your system, which can be found at Applications > Accessories > Character Map. Upon running Character Map, a window will appear.

To input the character you want, just select the language or character set in the left pane of the window, and then, in the right pane, click on the character you want to input. The character will appear in the little input box next to the words Text to copy at the bottom of the window. Just click the Copy button, and then paste the character wherever you want to place it.

In certain applications, such as the various OpenOffice.org modules, this method will not work. In these cases, the program usually offers a method of its own. In OpenOffice.org, for example, you can click Insert in the menu bar and then select Special Character. A selection window will then open, and you can select the character you want there. Once you've done that, click the OK button, and the character will appear in your document, after which the selection button will close by itself.

This tech tip is excerpted from Ubuntu for Non-geeks, 2nd Edition, authored by Rickford Grant. Published by our friends over at No Starch Press, ISBN-13:978-1-59327-152-7. Copyright 2007. For further information please visit http://www.nostarch.com.
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Umm...this applies to anything with GNOME, not just Ubuntu

Sum Yung Gai's picture

Nice tip, and thanks for it. However, it applies to any distribution that's running GNOME, not just Ubuntu. It applies to Debian, Fedora, etc.

On KDE desktops, you get the same functionality with the "KCharSelect" program. And though I usually do it on Slackware, it works fine with *buntu, too. :-) Oh, and CentOS, and Fedora, and Debian, and Mandriva, etc.

-SYG

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