HOW-TOs

Working with Command Arguments

In this article, I want to cover a more fundamental aspect of shell scripting: working with command arguments. I suspect that most shell scripts go through an evolution with their command flags, a more>>

AWS EC2 VPC CLI

There's just something about the fresh start you get with a new job. Both my previous job and my new one began with the opportunity to build a new infrastructure from scratch. In both cases, as is common with startup infrastructure in its early stages, everything was to be built using Amazon Web Services (AWS), specifically using its Elastic Cloud Computing (EC2) infrastructure. more>>

Words from Letter Cubes

I got a great letter from a reader with a puzzle to solve, so let's dig in, shall we? Here's what he wrote:

Love your column in Linux Journal. I've read it for years and learned a lot about shell scripting, but not quite enough to solve a puzzle on my own. more>>

Secure File Transfer

File transfer between Linux systems (and perhaps all POSIX systems in general) is in some ways a neglected subject. The arcane protocols in common use are far from secure, and the SSH replacements offer too much power and complexity. more>>

Transferring Conserver Logs to Elasticsearch

If your organization manages Linux, AIX, HP-UX or Solaris servers in-house, chances are your system administrators at least occasionally need low-level access to those devices. Typically, administrators use some kind of serial console—for example, traditional serial port, Serial-over-LAN or Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI). more>>

What's New in 3D Printing, Part IV: OctoPrint

This is the last article in a four-part series on the current state of 3D printing. In the first part, I gave an overall introduction to differences in 3D printing since I wrote my original articles on 3D printing three years ago. The second piece focused on advances in 3D printing hardware, and the third column covered 3D printing software. more>>

What's in the Box? Interrogate Your Linux Machine's Hardware

I recently had a problem trying to install the NVIDIA driver for my machine. It seemed the latest driver had stopped supporting my graphics card, and after updating my kernel, I was out of a driver. The question, obviously, was "which card did I have?" But, I didn't remember. more>>

Server Hardening

Server hardening. The very words conjure up images of tempering soft steel into an unbreakable blade, or taking soft clay and firing it in a kiln, producing a hardened vessel that will last many years. Indeed, server hardening is very much like that. more>>

MySQL—Some Handy Know-How

I recently was talking to someone over IRC who was helping me with a PHP app that was giving me trouble. The extremely helpful individual asked me to let him know the value of a certain field in a record on my MySQL server. I embarrassingly admitted that I'd have to install something like PHPMyAdmin or Adminer in order to find that information. more>>

Working with Functions: Towers of Hanoi

For this article, I thought it would be beneficial to go back to some basics of shell scripting and look at how functions work. Most script writers probably eschew using functions because it's a bit antithetical to how scripts tend to evolve, as a sequence of commands on the command line that are captured in a file. more>>

Build a Large-Screen Command Center with the RPi 2

When the folks who make the Raspberry Pi made good on their plan to release a multi-core version of the tiny computer with 1GB of RAM earlier this year, I saw it as the perfect opportunity to put the single-board Linux box to work—real work—in our company's network operations center. more>>

Securi-Pi: Using the Raspberry Pi as a Secure Landing Point

Like many LJ readers these days, I've been leading a bit of a techno-nomadic lifestyle as of the past few years—jumping from network to network, access point to access point, as I bounce around the real world while maintaining my connection to the Internet and other networks I use on a daily basis. more>>

Take Control of Your PC with UEFI Secure Boot

UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) is the open, multi-vendor replacement for the aging BIOS standard, which first appeared in IBM computers in 1976. The UEFI standard is extensive, covering the full boot architecture. This article focuses on a single useful but typically overlooked feature of UEFI: secure boot. more>>

Cipher Security: How to harden TLS and SSH

Encryption and secure communications are critical to our life on the Internet. Without the ability to authenticate and preserve secrecy, we cannot engage in commerce, nor can we trust the words of our friends and colleagues. more>>

It's a Bird. It's Another Bird!

Editor's Note: Shawn will be revisiting his birdcam in the December issue of Linux Journal, so here's the original article in the series to refresh your memory. more>>

Syndicate content