Quick Look at Lucid

Ubuntu just released the beta 1 version of their new LTS (Long Term Support) Distribution, Lucid 10.04. The theme is based on "light" and it looks great. Here's what to expect and what not to expect when you first install this new flavor of Ubuntu:

The first thing you notice when you launch the live CD is Ubuntu's new logo. Don't worry, they still have the basic logo but they added some new typography and use the logo like a registration mark. They went with the black desktop theme for their default, which is fine, but they moved something around. The window manager buttons went from the right side to the left, which is difficult at first if you are not used to it.

When I went to go launch Firefox: lo and behold the default search engine is Yahoo! I found this very interesting. Way to go Canonical! I am assuming they are getting some funds to help pay their developers.

Ubuntu has added a new Social Networking tool called Gwibber Social Client. Gwibber is an interesting application. It integrates your Flickr, Twitter, StatusNet, Qaiku, Facebook, Friendfeed, Digg, and Identi.ca all in one easy-to-use application. Empathy added the option to use Facebook chat which is really useful, especially if you use lists with your Facebook friends. Your contact list will be separated by the Facebook lists you have created.

Something that is missing with the new version is our old friend Gimp. Unfortunately Gimp is NOT installed by default, but it is in the repository, making it easy enough to install. I wish they would allow me to customize the sound scheme, because the only option you have is sounds or no sounds.

I heard a little rumor that Ubuntu would be adding a new Software Center where they will have paid applications, but fortunately they didn't take that path. Although they did add a Featured Applications section, they have a Canonical Partners section too.

Lucid means transmitting light, and that is what this new distro does. In short, it is shiny with a great looking GUI that isn't too boggy.

______________________

Zach Schneider is a web developer and Linux enthusiast. Find him on Twitter, @ZKM.

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Freedom of choice

enedene's picture

It is good thing that Ubuntu is giving a choice to users whither to use open and closed source applications. The reality of the world is that lot of software will never be FOSS and that there are no alternatives in FOSS for such property software or not to extent of quality that closed source software offers.
For example, I would never started using Linux if I couldn't have installed non-free flash or nvidia property drivers. And this is true for most regular users that I recommended using Ubuntu, which they use still.

Would it be great if all the software were free and open source? Of course, but that's never going to happen and I need to use my computer as a instrument for doing things, not the other way around.

Of course I will never pay 1000$ for piece of software for home usage, that would be absurd, the prices are absurd. But if some guy made a really cool piece of software and sold it for 2 bucks, sure I'll give him the money if I like what I see.

And I agree with that guy who said that Linux needs standards so more programmers contribute in 2 ways, surely more programmers in general and more software free (closed source) and software with a price tag.

FOSS is a nice idea, but FOSS or nothing is just fundamentalist philosophy, it's never going to happen. I'd like it to happen, but it never will, and that's why we need to be pragmatic.

Standards & ubuntu

Whizard72's picture

It's been recently that nvidia and adobe released their drivers and flash plugins that actually rock on ubuntu. The latest 64 bit flash is very impressive with resource usage and stability we could only have prayed for just a while back. Nvidias drivers actually make a lot of things possible for graphical app developers that wasn't viable before.

They're closed source. Which is okay because they add critical functionality for most users. If one wants to write a high performance 3d game for Linux nvidias drivers make that a viable effort.

Linux & Propriety

Whizard72's picture

You know why Linux will always be #3 behind OSX and Windows? Because of the FOSS evangelists who ostracize anyone who dares suggest making money. Well in the real world, money talks and baloney takes a hike, especially in a worsening global economy.

Also, the lack of standards is killing Linux support with OEMs and software development firms. Freedom of choice is nice, but not when it retards adoption and development of Linux which is stagnating due to reasons stated above.

Anyone ever try to configure GTK-RecordMyDesktop? I have to find my HW address for it to pick up my sound input? Come on man!

As much a geek and programmer that I am, I have to say that while compiling a new program is nice as an option, but must it be a requirement anytime something brand new comes out?

Those same programs typically have binaries already available for Win/Mac but I have to wrestle with dependencies and makefiles to get it to run on any distro of Linux nevermind Ubuntu which I use exclusively.

Bottom line:

In order for widespread adoption of Linux to become reality, there needs to be standards but FOSS evangelists won't let that happen because (GASP!) it interferes with their extremist ideals of freedom of choice.

Propriety is a fact of life in the REAL functioning world. People want to make money and be paid for their work. Linux will never be a strong force on the desktop without some propriety.

Open Source isn't about whether or not it costs money

Skyler Visconti's picture

I agree there should be a choice, but here's the thing: The FSF goes too far in many cases, as does the Linux "who-gives-a$^&" crowd.

The open source software model (not the free software model as RMS would like to call it), is better, not because GIMP is better than Photoshop (or cheaper), but because I can change gimp to work the way I want it to, and I'm not told I can't have a version that's right for me.

Another example: Would you buy a Ferrari if they set the governor to 65MPH and lowered the price by 10%? Aside from the fact that Enzo would roll over in his grave if that happened, this is what happens a majority of the time with Microsoft & Adobe products (M.S. Office & Photoshop - the two most requested pieces of software for new Linux users).

So all-in-all I say sure, open up an Ubuntu store for selling junk software, the way Apple has done with the iPhone, and wait for the quality of open source products to degrade. I've seen it happen on Maemo as developers have gone on develop junk apps for the iPhone to make money for Apple. If Canonical wants to claim 30% of junk software let them, but that just means there's less people to help with those bug fixes, patches, etc. They'll be working on their next Pandora/Twitter/YouTube app that does a slightly better job than the previous version, and still worse than visiting the website. (Anyone wonder why Apple refuses to install flash on the iPhone? Does 30% of apps-to-replace-flash-sites say anything?!?!)

/rant && shameless plug, check my blog for the answer

I'm the one who posted the

Anonymous's picture

I'm the one who posted the comment about boycotting Ubuntu and how I had switched to Debian and/or Crunchbang. I'm defiantly a free software fanatic. Although, I'm not against making money. I think that people involved in FSF and FOSS would have the same opinion. The use of software is a right, not a privilege. I prefer using products that encourage people to work together and solve problem as a community compared to using programs that stifle community cooperation. If you do try to cooperate with others and help each other then you are called a pirate by the company who made the software. All software should be free as in freedom and the source code should be available for anyone to see and edit it to their own needs. In this way we can work together to better humanity. This is just my viewpoint, you do not have to agree. I respect your opinion and I just hope that you can respect mine as well. I also apologize if I offended anyone. That was not my intent.

Debian is not on gnu.org's

CarrotRevelations's picture

Debian is not on gnu.org's free O.S. list. Does it need updating?

Right...

Whizard72's picture

I fully agree with the philosophy of FOSS. I would love it if I could buy Roxio Creator AND get the source code for it as well. The fact that I had to pay for it doesn't matter, it was still open source.

Human Knowledge belongs to the world, like Penicillin or aspirin. I like being able to play any video format on any device, not being restricted like I am on the iPod/iPhone.

What I am saying to a point is that right now, there's going to be some propriety in Linux software out of necessity. Nvidia's Linux drivers are AWESOME and yet they are proprietary. I don't care because they work great. Not everything HAS to be open source but the ideal world is where everything is.

All good and nice

runlevel0's picture

All what you said is very nice, winning money, etc...

Just one little point: Why do I want to pay for something if I can get it for free?

With a catalogue of over 6000 applications, why do I want to use exactly the one that costs money?

Just because I think that capiltalism and free market is fantastic and winning money is fabulous? Well, I don't think that free market means _exactly_ paying for something if you have a smilar thing for free.

There are very few applications in Linux that are paid software, and not because the 'not winning money' factor, but just because the bulk of privative software for the win32 and Mac environments are small applications that have a FOSS counterpart in Linux... and every time more also in Win32 / 64 and Mac OS X.

And you (and many people) miss the Real Big Picture: For Linux, desktop is just a secondary market, don't ever forget servers, supercomputing, embedded apps and Android... and I surely forget something.

Just to give you an idea: Almost every raid controller nowadays incldue embedded Linux and nearly all NAS do... ask the developers of Busybox, or ask the developers of the Twonky Media Server.

Money does not come from selling directly software, this way of thinking is simplistic.

But well, whining about the Evil FOSS radikalz is always an easy resource, and it's not less easy and cheap becuase we use capitals to try to enforce our (simplistic) view of what's _real_

(sorry for the flame)

the boss has spoken

Alex Stone's picture

I'm not an Ubuntu user (Gentoo here), but the wife is, and she's decided she wants this installed when it's publicly released.

That's settled then......

anonymous said: "According

eddy3456's picture

anonymous said: "According the Ubuntu wiki the selling of non-free software in the software center will not happen until the 10.10 release (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/SoftwareCenter). I've used Ubuntu in one way or another since it first started. Although, with some of their decision, selling non-free software is the main reason, I will no longer be able to use the distribution. I hope more people will boycott Ubuntu in hopes they will change there minds over this decision to sell non-free software. It goes against everything the Linux community stands for. Currently I've switched to Ubuntu's parent distribution Debian. Also been using the Crunchbang 10 Statler alpah 1 release based off of Debian. Great distribution."

Do you have to be such a drama queen? My god. Heaven forbid they should try to make some money. It's not like they are going to force you to purchase anything. Believe it or not, you use many proprietary things everyday in your life, and you're worried about canonical selling software? Get a life dude.

Inmmature

Din vän pessimisten's picture

How immature of you. You should try to argue instead of just insulting him. You should also learn to respect those with the FOSS-way of thinking.

This article is on linuxjournal.com?

Anonymous's picture

Linux Journal should be embarrassed publishing this. It looks like a third grader's homework assignment.

seconded

Anonymous's picture

Are you in need of writers?

far too cursory an overview

Anonymous's picture

Do you want them to make a profit or not?

Anonymous's picture

Just a moment..

"Way to go Canonical! I am assuming they are getting some funds to help pay their developers." (I sure they are getting some Cash from Yahoo for this)

and

"adding a new Software Center where they will have paid applications, but fortunately they didn't take that path." (I assume they would get a portion of the profits)

So do you want them to make Money to pay developers or not?

Lucid

Anonymous13's picture

Thank Bob Lucid doesnt have groundbraking changes like LTS releases are supposed to, NOT.

"selling of non-free

Anonymous's picture

"selling of non-free software...."

Good luck with that! ;)

According the Ubuntu wiki the

Anonymous's picture

According the Ubuntu wiki the selling of non-free software in the software center will not happen until the 10.10 release (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/SoftwareCenter). I've used Ubuntu in one way or another since it first started. Although, with some of their decision, selling non-free software is the main reason, I will no longer be able to use the distribution. I hope more people will boycott Ubuntu in hopes they will change there minds over this decision to sell non-free software. It goes against everything the Linux community stands for. Currently I've switched to Ubuntu's parent distribution Debian. Also been using the Crunchbang 10 Statler alpah 1 release based off of Debian. Great distribution.

Not really...

chrisinspace's picture

Actually, you haven't gone upstream to Debian. CrunchBang is a downstream distro based on Ubuntu. From DistroWatch:

"CrunchBang Linux is an Ubuntu-based distribution featuring the light-weight Openbox window manager and GTK+ applications. The distribution has been built from a minimal Ubuntu system and customised to offer a good balance of speed and functionality."

The newest version Statler,

Anonymous's picture

The newest version Statler, is based on Debian. You should really read the WHOLE site before posting. The person you are responding to is correct and you are wrong.

What non free software ?

runlevel0's picture

Well, I'm amazed... what non-free software for Linux can you actually sell?
I know there is some stuff, but why do you want to prefer it to completely free apicaltions in the first place ?

Re:

jordan's picture

There's quite a few indie game companies that do linux, but don't release the source. There's also alternative Office apps, such as Softmaker, and IBM Lotus, and then a lot of third party management apps.

Don't take me wrong: I am not

runlevel0's picture

Don't take me wrong: I am not RMS nor a FOSS radical, I just don't b elieve that this initiave of Canonical will be a commercial success.

I am aware that there is 'Fat Ass' software like Lotus or some of the comercial graphics applications Like Maya, but I don't think that Canonical will make much revenue from offering them.

For games, well, it may be interesting, but I really don't know too many titles besides (my beloved) Dominions 3.

I don't think that a special selling platform for paid Linux software will make any difference: If companies want to sell software for Linux they can do it by themselves, exactly the same as in Mac or Win.

That's my opinion; it's just not a commercially good idea.

Zach Schneider, what were you thinking here?

Din vän pessimisten's picture

"When I went to go launch Firefox: lo and behold the default search engine is Yahoo! I found this very interesting. Way to go Canonical! I am assuming they are getting some funds to help pay their developers." Yahoo Search = MS Bing http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/search/alliance/alliance-1.html;_ylt=Ak...

How is paying Microsoft a good thing? @Canonical; Do no evil!

"I heard a little rumor that Ubuntu would be adding a new Software Center where they will have paid applications, but fortunately they didn't take that path"
The important question isn't if the software cost money. It is whether it is open source or not. I think most users don't really care if the applications is open either as long as Linux is.

Lovin' The Lynx

likemindead's picture

I've got 10.04 on my eight-year-old Pentium III laptop and it's brilliant! :D

hehhe

spc's picture

And Ive got 10.04 on my 12 years old Pentium II laptop and its brilliant :D

Isn't this just the public

Anonymous's picture

Isn't this just the public beta release? The Ubuntu site shows that the stable version won't be released until April 29.

Corrected! I should have

Webmistress's picture

Corrected! I should have caught that. My bad.

Katherine Druckman is webmistress at LinuxJournal.com. You might find her on Twitter or at the Southwest Drupal Summit

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