Create a Custom Transitioning Background for Your Gnome 2.28 Desktop

 in

While test-driving the new Gnome 2.28 desktop, I was surprised to see that among the default backgrounds, there was a "Cosmos" slide-show of several cosmic pictures of space that regularly transition on your desktop. While I had used this feature in the past when using KDE, I was not aware of how to create my own slide-show backgrounds in Gnome. By examining how the Cosmos slide-show works, I figured out how to create my own custom slide-show backgrounds. Read on and find out to create your own custom desktop background.

Creating a Custom XML File for Your Backgrounds

Gnome uses an XML file to contain the configuration information necessary to run the backgrounds as a slide-show. The "Cosmos" XML file can be found at /usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/background-1.xml and contains all of the information that Gnome requires.

Here is what it looks like:

<background>
  <starttime>
    <year>2009</year>
    <month>08</month>
    <day>04</day>
    <hour>00</hour>
    <minute>00</minute>
    <second>00</second>
  </starttime>
<!-- This animation will start at midnight. -->
  <static>
    <duration>1795.0</duration>
    <file>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/cloud.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/cloud.jpg</from>
    <to>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/comet.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>1795.0</duration>
    <file>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/comet.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/comet.jpg</from>
    <to>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/earth-horizon.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>1795.0</duration>
    <file>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/earth-horizon.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/earth-horizon.jpg</from>
    <to>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/blue-marble-west.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>1795.0</duration>
    <file>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/blue-marble-west.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/blue-marble-west.jpg</from>
    <to>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/galaxy-ngc3370.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>1795.0</duration>
    <file>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/galaxy-ngc3370.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/galaxy-ngc3370.jpg</from>
    <to>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/helix-nebula.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>1795.0</duration>
    <file>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/helix-nebula.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/helix-nebula.jpg</from>
    <to>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/jupiter.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>1795.0</duration>
    <file>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/jupiter.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/jupiter.jpg</from>
    <to>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/sombrero.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>1795.0</duration>
    <file>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/sombrero.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/sombrero.jpg</from>
    <to>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/whirlpool.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>1795.0</duration>
    <file>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/whirlpool.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/whirlpool.jpg</from>
    <to>/usr/share/backgrounds/cosmos/cloud.jpg</to>
  </transition>
</background>

The duration is listed in seconds (the <duration> tag), so the 1795.0 specified for an image (the <static> tag) would be 29 minutes and 55 seconds. During a five second transition (the <transition> tag), the previous image changes to the current image. When this image has been shown for 1795 seconds, it then transitions to the next file. In the "Cosmos" XML file, the last file transitions back to the first file in the listing. I followed this convention in my XML template file, which you can use to create your own custom slide-show listing:

<!-- Template created by Ross Larson for linuxjournal.com -->
<background>
  <starttime>
    <hour>0</hour>
    <minute>00</minute>
    <second>01</second>
  </starttime>
<!-- this creates an arbitrary start time of 12 am -->
  <static>
    <duration>855.0</duration>
    <file>/path/to/wallpaper_number_one.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/path/to/wallpaper_number_one.jpg</from>
    <to>/path/to/wallpaper_number_two.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>855.0</duration>
    <file>/path/to/wallpaper_number_two.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/path/to/wallpaper_number_two.jpg</from>
    <to>/path/to/wallpaper_number_three.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>855.0</duration>
    <file>/path/to/wallpaper_number_three.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/path/to/wallpaper_number_three.jpg</from>
    <to>/path/to/wallpaper_number_four.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>855.0</duration>
    <file>/path/to/wallpaper_number_four.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/path/to/wallpaper_number_four.jpg</from>
    <to>/path/to/wallpaper_number_five.jpg</to>
  </transition>
  <static>
    <duration>855.0</duration>
    <file>/path/to/wallpaper_number_five.jpg</file>
  </static>
  <transition>
    <duration>5.0</duration>
    <from>/path/to/wallpaper_number_five.jpg</from>
    <to>/path/to/wallpaper_number_one.jpg</to>
  </transition>
</background>

Since I have a shorter attention span than the Gnome developer who created the original XML, I created a default duration of 855.0 + 5.0 seconds, or 15 minutes per image including transition. If you wish to add additional images, or remove images, from your XML, simply add, or remove, the following:

<static>
  <duration>855.0</duration>
  <file>/path/to/wallpaper_you_want_to_add.jpg</file>
</static>
<transition>
  <duration>5.0</duration>
  <from>/path/to/wallpaper_you_want_to_add.jpg</from>
  <to>/path/to/next_wallpaper.jpg</to>
</transition>

A rule of thumb for parsing the XML file is that you will see each image path mentioned three times:

  • Once to transition from the previous image to the current image.
  • Once to indicate the duration of the current image.
  • Once to transition from the current image to the next image.

Notes

  • Rename the XML to any name you wish, as long as you keep the .xml extension.
  • The path to the images does not have to point to /usr/share/backgrounds, but keep in mind that if you change distros or migrate from one computer to another, the XML will not work if the images are in a different path than the one indicated in your XML file.
  • Make sure to transition back to the first image when entering information about the last image in your desktop slide-show.
  • I recommend using GVIM to edit your XML file, as I was able to make extensive use of the "Find and Replace" feature to update file names and durations. If you're awesome like Kyle Rankin and live at the command line, feel free to use the old school vim text commands, as well.

Selecting the Completed XML File in GNOME

To activate your new background:

  • Right-click on your desktop to select "Change Desktop Background"

    lj1.jpg
  • Choose "Add" from the background appearance preferences window.

    lj2.jpg
  • Select the "All Files" filter to show the custom XML file that you have created.

    lj3.jpg
  • Choose your custom XML file and select "Open". (Here, my XML file is named "dualies.xml")

    lj4.jpg
  • Select your new desktop background slide-show, and admire the results.

    lj5.jpg

This process has been tested in Ubuntu 9.10 and Fedora 12, though I assume that it will work in any environment that is capable of running Gnome 2.28

Enjoy!

AttachmentSize
lj1.jpg24.82 KB
lj2.jpg55.33 KB
lj3.jpg114.9 KB
lj4.jpg109.37 KB
lj5.jpg861.6 KB
xml-files.tgz721 bytes
______________________

Linux rocks! Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

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Java executable jar to create xml file

Kenny's picture

GNOME Slideshow Background XML creator
This is a link to gnome-look.org to download an executable jar that will find all images in a folder and create an xml in that folder. The program has inputs for duration and fade time. The xml file is placed into the folder with the images.
The xml file can be anywhere as long as the files it points to do not move.

Author's Comment

Ross Larson's picture

Great job, Kenny! Thank you very much. The purpose of this article was to communicate that transitioning backgrounds were possible, and your program will help people make that a reality.

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

Both. Does the XML have to be

tbbowser's picture

Both. Does the XML have to be in the "background" folder or can it be in another folder and still work? I've been doing the latter, but if it is the former, then I'll put it in there. Would 9.04's already present transistioning effect when changing wallpapers under normal circumstances be the cause of the XML not working, too?

XML File Permissions

David Krajnik's picture

I just discovered another important bit of info. The XML file will not work for you unless your user has read permissions for it. This might be what is causing problems for some of you. I think that what happens is if you create the XML file in the /usr/share/backgrounds/ directory using the sudo command, the file has only permissions granted to the superuser by default. If you do not have read permissions for the file, you can add it with this command:
sudo chmod a+r file.xml
To check what permissions you have on the file, use this command:
ls -l file.xml
If you have read permissions, you will see something like this:
-rw-r--r-- 1 david root 1815 2010-01-26 20:40 file.xml
If you do not have read permissions, you will see something like this:
-rw------- 1 david root 1815 2010-01-26 20:40 file.xml
I don't know if you need read permissions for the wallpaper images themselves as well, but you probably do.

Unix Shell Script for Automating the XML Creation

David Krajnik's picture

I have created a Unix/Linux Shell Script to automate the process of creating an XML file in the format described above. It should prove to be more flexible than the PERL script provided earlier because with my script you can specify image files from multiple directories on your computer rather than just a single directory, and you can control the order in which the images will display. Furthermore, my script is not interactive; so you can type all the input at once, check it for correctness, and simply press enter to create the XML file. The script also has error-checking built into it; so if you give it faulty input, it will tell you instead of creating an XML file that you cannot use.

If you want to use this script, here is how to do it:
1) Copy the code for the script below into a file called mkwlppr.sh (short for "make wallpaper").
2) Make the script executable by typing:
sudo chmod 711 mkwlppr.sh
3) Place this file in the directory /usr/local/bin so that you can run it from any directory by just using its name. Here is the command: sudo mv mkwlppr.sh /usr/local/bin
4) Execute the script by simply typing its name to see how it is used; it will tell you what input it requires from you.
5) Use the script with input to create as many wallpaper XML files as you want.
6) Use the instructions originally posted here to set your new XML files as dynamic backgrounds.

Important Notes:
A) Since this script is not interactive, you can use Unix's wildcards with it if you want to use all files in a directory and/or if you do not care about the order of the images.
B) You can specify paths relative to your current directory, and the script will put the files' absolute paths into the XML file for you; so you can create the XML file anywhere you want and move it afterward without rendering it useless.
C) If you want to run the script inside the /usr/share/backgrounds/ directory (which is where you will probably want to place the XML file after you create it), you might have problems with permissions unless you run the command with sudo like this:
sudo mkwlppr.sh parameters
D) If you do not know what duration to specify for the images, simply do not provide a number in the input, and the progam will use a default value. The default duration value is the same as the cosmos wallpaper that ships with Ubuntu.

Here is the code for the script:

#!/bin/sh
#This script creates xml files that can act as dynamic wallpapers for Gnome by referring to multiple wallpapers
#Coded by David J Krajnik

if [ "$*" = "" ]; then
  echo "This script creates xml files that can act as dynamic backgrounds for Gnome by referring to multiple wallpapers";
  echo "Usage: mkwlppr.sh target-file.xml [duration] pic1 pic2 [pic3 .. picN]";
else
  files=$*;
  #Grab the name of the target xml file
  xmlfile=`echo $files | cut -d " " -f 1`;
  #remove the first item from $files
  files=`echo $files | sed 's/^\<[^ ]*\>//'`;
  if [ "`echo $xmlfile | grep '\.xml$'`" = "" ]; then
    echo "Your target file must be an XML file";
  else
    inputIsValid="true";
    firstItem=`echo $files | cut -d " " -f 1`;
    duration="1795.0";#set the default duration
    if [ "`echo $firstItem | grep '^[0-9]\+\.[0-9]\+$'`" != "" ]; then
      echo "The duration must be an integer";
      files=`echo $files | sed 's/^\<[^ ]*\>//'`;
      inputIsValid="";
    elif [ "`echo $firstItem | grep '^[0-9]\+$'`" != "" ]; then
      #If the item is a number, then use it as the duration for each wallpaper image
      duration="`expr $firstItem - 5`.0";
      #remove the duration from the list of files
      files=`echo $files | sed 's/^\<[^ ]*\>//'`;
    fi
    if [ "$files" = "" ]; then
      echo "You must enter image files to associate with the XML file";
    else
      for file in $files
      do
        if [ ! -f $file ]; then
	  echo "\"$file\" does not exist";
	  inputIsValid="";
        elif [ "`echo $file | sed 's/^.*\.\(jpg\|jpeg\|bmp\|png\|gif\|tif\|tiff\|jif\|jfif\|jp2\|jpx\|j2k\|j2c\)$//'`" != "" ]; then
	  echo "\"$file\" is not an image file";
	  inputIsValid="";
	fi
      done
      if [ $inputIsValid ]; then
        currDir=`pwd`;
        echo "<background>" >> $xmlfile
        echo "  <starttime>\n    <year>2009</year>\n    <month>08</month>\n    <day>04</day>" >> $xmlfile;
        echo "    <hour>00</hour>\n    <minute>00</minute>\n    <second>00</second>\n  </starttime>" >> $xmlfile;
        echo "  <!-- This animation will start at midnight. -->" >> $xmlfile;
        firstFile=`echo $files | cut -d " " -f 1`;#grab the first item
        if [ "`echo $firstFile | sed 's/\(.\).*/\1/'`" != "/" ]; then
          #If the first character in the filename is not '/', then it is a relative path and must have the current directory's path appended
          firstFile="$currDir/$firstFile";
        fi
        firstFile=`echo $firstFile | sed 's/[^/]\+\/\.\.\/\?//g'`;#Remove occurrences of ".." from the filepath
        files=`echo $files | sed 's/^\<[^ ]*\>//'`;#remove the first item
        prevFile=$firstFile;
        currFile="";
        #TODO add absolute path to the filenames
        #if $currFile =~ "^/.*" then the file needs to path appended
        echo "  <static>\n    <duration>$duration</duration>\n    <file>$firstFile</file>\n  </static>" >> $xmlfile;
        for currFile in $files
        do
          if [ "`echo $currFile | sed 's/\(.\).*/\1/'`" != "/" ]; then
            #If the first character in the filename is not '/', then it is a relative path and must have the current directory's path appended
            currFile="$currDir/$currFile";
          fi
          currFile=`echo $currFile | sed 's/[^/]\+\/\.\.\/\?//g'`;#Remove occurrences of ".." from the filepath
          echo "  <transition>\n    <duration>5.0</duration>\n    <from>$prevFile</from>\n    <to>$currFile</to>\n  </transition>" >> $xmlfile;
          echo "  <static>\n    <duration>$duration</duration>\n    <file>$currFile</file>\n  </static>" >> $xmlfile;
          prevFile=$currFile;
        done
        echo "  <transition>\n    <duration>5.0</duration>\n    <from>$currFile</from>\n    <to>$firstFile</to>\n  </transition>" >> $xmlfile;
        echo "</background>" >> $xmlfile;
      fi
    fi
  fi
fi

Nice Post

davidemc's picture

Thanks this works in Suse too of course...

Earlier versions of Gnome?

melipone's picture

Does anybody know what's the earliest version of Gnome that would work too? Somebody mentioned 2.26. Anything earlier? I have an old computer running an old version of Gnome in the basement that is not used often and would be great for running a slide show. I'm afraid it's running Gnome 2.10.

TIA

Author's Comment

Ross Larson's picture

I don't have any machines running Gnome versions as old as 2.10, but I suggest giving it a try, and reporting your results here.

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

great work

Anonymous's picture

Just followed your tutorial and worked perfectly!

Wonder if you can do the same in windows?

Last image

dUker's picture

Great script ! I have a problem with my custom xml files, all of them don't show the last image, my desktop stays in solid color and compared with the cosmo's file, the my have only more images.

PS.: "Make sure to transition back to the first image when entering information about the last image in your desktop slide-show." DONE.

Thanks to everyone, that contribute to my question. :D

chomp

dUKer's picture

Thats only a line added to the script
chomp ($files)
after of read the variable, the chomp remove a \n that the zenity add to the variable by default.

Sorry my english, i'm brazilian. :D

gnome

HarryX's picture

It it possible to use this wallpaper change on Ubuntu9.04
And what is needed to install

HarryX

Ubuntu 9.04

Ross Larson's picture

Well, I just tried loading an XML background file on one of my older Ubuntu 9.04 boxes (running GNOME 2.26), and it worked just fine.

Manually editing the XML doesn't require installing anything, but I'd recommend installing gvim(sudo apt-get install vim-gnome) for text editing (gedit works just fine, though).

For the scripts that are mentioned in the comments, you will need to have perl installed.

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

How did you get it to work in

tbbowser's picture

How did you get it to work in 9.04 because I can't seem to get it to work? It's using pictures in my "Pictures" folder instead of my "/usr/share/backgrounds" but it's not transitioning whatsoever. What would you recommend?

Author's Comment

Ross Larson's picture

I'm not sure what the issue is with your system. Did you manually edit the XML, or use one of the programs/scripts in the comments?

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

Both. Does the XML have to be

tbbowser's picture

Both. Does the XML have to be in the "background" folder or can it be in another folder and still work? I've been doing the latter, but if it is the former, then I'll put it in there. Would 9.04's already present transistioning effect when changing wallpapers under normal circumstances be the cause of the XML not working, too?

from to urls?

Anonymous's picture

Can this use an image bucket?

I don't think so.

Ross Larson's picture

I don't think the XML can refer to a url, but I haven't tried.
I'd suggesting taking a look at the gaze project if you're interested in that.
http://gaze.sourceforge.net/

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

Not working

bruno miranda's picture

I made the xml files but my pictures do not make the transition correctly, they only change if i save the .xml file or reselect it from the "change background menu". :(

Please tell us more...

Ross Larson's picture

Did you manually edit the XML or use one of the scripts listed in the comments?

When you say "save the .xml file", what do you mean? You do need to create your own XML file for this to work.

The paths that you are storing the images may also be useful.

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

Happens to me too. I edit

Anonymous's picture

Happens to me too. I edit the xml with gedit, and the only changes I see happen when I save it, or when I select it again from gnome-appearance, (in other words when it's forced to reload the file).

may be it's our distro

bruno miranda's picture

Yeah i just edited the .xml file didn't use any scrip, i think that even the cosmos default one do not work
at least when i reboot the background changes ¬¬

What distro are you using? i'm in Sabayon 5.0 fully updated. I'll try their forum.

Thanks people form answering.

Documentation and Support...

Ross Larson's picture

Unfortunately, I wasn't very successful in finding GNOME documentation that explains how this XML file should act, nor how to troubleshoot it if isn't working correctly. In theory, answers should be available by reading from the GNOME Documentation Library. When I read through the documentation, I couldn't find any reference to the XML wallpaper config file, so this article is a crude attempt to reverse-engineer the pre-existing XML markup.

 If you continue to experience issues, the best recommendation that I can make is to start a thread in the GNOME user forum or GNOME mailing list (there is also an expansive list archive available). You could also report a bug in GNOME Bugzilla or chat up some of the GNOME users and devs on IRC. Per the support page, "The Internet Relay Chat (IRC) network with the largest GNOME presence is GIMPnet (irc.gnome.org port 6667), with the channels #gnome being the main resources."

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

Thanks for the suggestions.

Anonymous's picture

Thanks for the suggestions. I found a bug that pretty much fits, and after applying the patch provided, transitioning worked =D
https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=601753
I'm using ubuntu karmic btw, and rebuilt the package libgnome-desktop from source with apt-get source, but I expect the fix will be applied in a future update anyway.

Great tutorial

randiroo76073's picture

I don't know anything about XML but your tutorial made it simple for me to modify and make my own transitions. Thanks

You're welcome!

Ross Larson's picture

I'm happy to help! Enjoy the transitioning backgrounds!

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

Have a look at Wallpaper Tray

BigAl's picture

Sits on your task bar, and you can change pics by simply clicking on it. Made for Gnome.

Can't get script from FTP

MarkS's picture

Just tried to download the script from the FTP site and getting an error.

Xfce

Hezy's picture

Xfce had this feature ages ago ;)

as did KDE ...

Ross Larson's picture

I used to use this feature in KDE 3 all the time. I have since moved to the Gnome desktop, but I really missed being able to switch up backgrounds. Hence, the tutorial.

I'm not really trying to create window manager wars here. I'm just trying to help people get extra features on their Linux desktops, because I think that's cool.

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

Transitioning Backgrounds in Gnome 2.28

Merlin's picture

Any reason we're ignoring Desktop Drapes here??? Works great. Just not in the default load.

Alternatives ...

Ross Larson's picture

Wallpapoz, Gaze, and Desktop Drapes are indeed other options for you. Drapes is in the "universe" repository for Ubuntu 9.10 under the title "drapes", and may be available for other distros, as well.

Our very own Shawn Powers has recently provided a video Tech Tip for working with Drapes, if you wanted to give it a try.

I agree that manually updating XML isn't the most elegant way of doing things, but it is a way of doing things regardless of distro, or regardless of *NIX. I assume that my hack would work on BSD versions of GNOME, as well.

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

Automate this whole procedure

Newky's picture

Ive made a perl script to automate the procedure,

http://www.sendspace.com/file/4zypt9

run it using "perl groupphoto.pl"

Enter a Picture folder,

Enter a Duration, i.e 900 will mean 895 plus a 5 sec transition delay

It will generate a xml file in your home directory called photos.xml

Then follow instructions on this page to set as wallpaper

Awesome!

Ross Larson's picture

Thanks for writing the perl script. That will make life much easier for people!

With my first test directory, it worked great!

The second time I tried, I noticed that the script didn't work if the filenames were too similar.
The filenames in question were:
~/test/1280x800.png
~/test/1280x800-2.png
~/test/1280x800-3.png
~/test/1280x800-4.png
~/test/1280x800-5.png
~/test/1280x800-6.png

It created an XML file with only one image (1280x800.png) in it.

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

Oh sorry jus a slight

Newky's picture

Oh sorry jus a slight oversight in my reg expression

I'll try fix it up and repost !!

Some chnages in the scriptt.

Amit Agarwal's picture

I have mode some changes in the script to take care of the changes for the file names (similar) and when not photos are read. The same cab be found at ftp://blog.amit-agarwal.co.in//groupphoto.pl

For those of you having issues with ftp, let me know, I will put the same on my blog.

Sorry Amit I couldnt manage

Newky's picture

Sorry Amit I couldnt manage to access your ftp,

Ive made a slight change to the script,

it now uses zenity to give a basic file selection window, you can select multiple files...

This should conquer the other problems,

Please anyone feel free to modify !!

Newky

Sorry forgot to attach the

Newky's picture

Sorry forgot to attach the link

http://www.sendspace.com/file/7q5ndw

Nice!

Ross Larson's picture

Great addition. I tried it out and it worked wonderfully.

Linux rocks!
Personal blog: zootlinux.blogspot.com

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Linux Backup and Recovery Webinar

Most companies incorporate backup procedures for critical data, which can be restored quickly if a loss occurs. However, fewer companies are prepared for catastrophic system failures, in which they lose all data, the entire operating system, applications, settings, patches and more, reducing their system(s) to “bare metal.” After all, before data can be restored to a system, there must be a system to restore it to.

In this one hour webinar, learn how to enhance your existing backup strategies for better disaster recovery preparedness using Storix System Backup Administrator (SBAdmin), a highly flexible bare-metal recovery solution for UNIX and Linux systems.

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Sponsored by Storix