Amateur Radio forums, now with tech support! (I hope)

Have you ever had that question, the one that you just know someone else has solved, but you cannot figure out the right words to put into the query so that Google will spit back the right answer? Or worse, you just know deep down inside that someone has not only wrestled with the problem, but solved it and they just never got around to writing up the solution and posting it somewhere for everyone to see?

If, like me, you hate documentation, especially when it comes to resolving your own problems, this fast becomes a real issue. And while I certainly do not have a silver bullet that will help you with your documentation issues, where it comes to matters of Amateur Radio and Linux, I might be able to provide you with a sounding board.

A couple of days ago, I received a Letter to the Editor with just such a question. The type that needs an answer, but that I certainly could not answer. So I created a forum post with the question and I now ask for your help! And I promise I will only ask once! From here on, you should check out the virtual ham shack postings!

Got a question? Got an answer? Give and give back! We are all in this together!

UPDATE: And that is how it works! Thanks to Russ, K5TUX for posting a possible answer (and all the great stuff he and Richard do at Linux in the Hamshack!).

______________________

David Lane, KG4GIY is a member of Linux Journal's Editorial Advisory Panel and the Control Op for Linux Journal's Virtual Ham Shack

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Packet Radio

twarnall's picture

What programs will work in Ubuntu for Packet Radio? I am using WinPack in Windows.

packet on ububtu

kc8oyq's picture

If you ever find out. Please let me know. I am having the same problem. I use to use Multipsk on windows, but now with this "ol so great windows 7" It will not even see the sound card. If I hear something I'll let you know.

Linux amateur radio software

KB2YUI's picture

I have a question about Linux amateur radio programs? Some of them state that they emulate the soundcard into being a modem. Is that an entirely true statement or does one still have to use a TNC/Interface?

Sounds and looks great

vo1pwf's picture

let me know if I can be of any help in any of it

I have encountered some

KB2YUI's picture

I have encountered some physical disabilities hindering my activity) and equipment (my laptop died) setbacks. Will get back to you when I am ready to resume. THANK YOU and 73!

tnx and 73

KB2YUI's picture

vo1pwf-Thanks so much> I will begin set up in a week or two when I am done taking care of my Mom who broke her tibia patella plateau.

Slowly getting back into ham radio

KB2YUI's picture

Greetings all hams and possibly soon to be hams. I have lots of questions so I will be asking them in the days to go by. Will not have much time over the next several days as my MOM just got out of the hospital and I have to tend to her.

I have two questions for now. Is there anyone knowledgeable who could help this disabled veteran with setting up a VHF Packet Station using VoIP using a modest set up with a laptop and an HT? Also does any one know if there is a Linux program out there that is free and works to send CW from a laptop computer keyboard and receive via a laptop computer, XCVR, and interface?

That is all for now. 73's de KB2YUI

Good questions!

David Lane's picture

I will pull these out and start a new thread if you would like. Thanks for asking! I would suggest you look at Asterisk as the VoIP engine with Xchat (I think) as a good softphone solution. I will dig a bit more though and see what else I can find.

David Lane, KG4GIY is a member of Linux Journal's Editorial Advisory Panel and the Control Op for Linux Journal's Virtual Ham Shack

THNX and 73 David

KB2YUI's picture

I appreciate you and the other guy for wanting to help me out, Oh, by the way, nice hat! Yes please pull these out and start a new thread if you like. Again THNX and 73!

White Paper
Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

Learn More

Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

Learn More

Sponsored by ActiveState