Real-Time and Performance Improvements in the 2.6 Linux Kernel

Work on improving the responsiveness and real-time performance of the Linux kernel holds even more promise for the future.
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How to create graphs?

Ravi's picture

I compiled realfeel.c and at runtime, it looks like below:

[ravi@fedora ravi]$ ./a.out
1666.759 MHz
64 Hz
9728.987492
1.495483
0.564934
0.855318
0.711926
0.762923
0.801921
0.849318
0.704126
0.459340
0.643530
1.055707
0.541535
0.976511
-2.775681
-2.814079
7.247364
-3.006068
-2.259109
8.155114
0.580533
0.843319
0.857718
0.405943
0.813320
0.757524
8.378301
1.055707
0.727525
0.794122
0.684928
0.896716
0.659129
0.800721

It is running infinitely. I stopped with Contrl^C key. I want to run it for some time and create a graph with the jitter information. My doubt is how do I capture jitters and which utility on Linux I have to use to see the graph with jitters? I am using Red Hat Linux Fedora 3. I want to generate the graphs as shown in this article.

Thank you,
Ravi

gnuplot

Dimitris Tsifakis's picture

Use gnuplot. Run the tool, redirect the ouput to a file (say jitter.txt), then remove the first few lines from that file and run gnuplot like this

koko$ gnuplot
gnuplot> plot "jitter.txt" using 1

Read the gnuplot doco in order to find out how to make your graph better looking.

cheers
dimitris

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