Linux Journal FAQ


This FAQ contains information about Linux Journal (LJ), the premier magazine covering the Linux community. Topics covered include a history of LJ, general information, editorial content, advertising in LJ, and subscriptions.

General Information and History of Linux Journal

Linux Journal, currently celebrating its 20th year of publication, is the original magazine of the global Linux community, delivering readers the advice and inspiration they need to get the most out of their Linux systems.

In-depth information provides a full 360-degree look at featured topics relating to Linux, giving a comprehensive source of everything readers need for creating and completing their own projects -- not just tools they will use today, but relevant and encompassing information they will turn to in future months and years. In addition to how-to content, Linux Journal includes opinions, new product information, profiles of leaders making major contributions in Open Source and product reviews. It also covers business, social and technical news and developments in order to fulfill its mission as the central forum and advocate for the greater Linux community throughout the world.

Linux Journal was first published in April 1994 by Phil Hughes and Bob Young, co-founder of Red Hat. Hughes went on to continue publishing Linux Journal for more than a decade, and in 2006, he handed the reins to long-time LJ employee Carlie Fairchild. Fairchild is the founder of Belltown Media, Inc., the current publisher of Linux Journal.

Today, Linux Journal's very own superstar Doc Searls, recently named one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in IT by eWeek, executive editor Jill Franklin and associate editor Shawn Powers lead the way with inspiring editorial direction for the magazine. Regular LJ contributors include a list of Linux luminaries, such as Kyle Rankin, Reuven Lerner, Dave Taylor, Mick Bauer, Zack Brown and Bill Childers, just to name a few.

Linux Journal is a digital publication with subscriptions including access to e-Reader (.epub), Kindle (.mobi), and PDF formats, as well our custom Android, iPhone and iPad apps. Now anywhere you go, Linux Journal will go with you.

To subscribe to Linux Journal, visit http://www.linuxjournal.com/subscribe. Digital subscriptions are available world-wide for one standard fee of $29.50 USD. Subscribe to the digital edition today.

We accept payment by credit card (Visa, MasterCard and American Express), and we also accept checks in US funds drawn on a US bank. Subscriptions can be ordered on-line, or you may contact our subscriber services department via e-mail, subs@linuxjournal.com. Subscriber services can also be reached by phone at (toll-free) 1-888-66-LINUX, from outside the US or Canada at +1 818-487-2089 or by fax at +1 818-487-4550. If you prefer snail mail: Linux Journal, P.O. Box 16476, North Hollywood, CA 91615-9911 USA.

If you're looking to purchase a single back issue, the last year's worth of LJ issues are available for sale in our Store (while supplies last).

Linux Journal is the leading media brand of the Linux and open-source markets. To ensure unmatched coverage, Linux Journal proudly features regular columns written by the now famous team of Mick Bauer, Reuven Lerner, Dave Taylor, Kyle Rankin, Bill Childers, John Knight, James Gray, Zack Brown, Shawn Powers and Doc Searls. Learn more about these columns and other regular Linux Journal departments:

  • Current_Issue.tar.gz Editor Shawn Powers walks you through the current issue and highlights the special features you should make sure not to miss.
  • At the Forge Written by Reuven Lerner, a longtime columnist for LJ, At the Forge focuses on leading-edge Linux application development trends. A current demographic study showed that more than 75% of Linux Journal readers are involved in some form of software development. Recent At the Forge columns have discussed NoSQL and HTML5.
  • Hack and / LJ's Hack Editor Kyle Rankin provides monthly how-to tips for system administrators and users who prefer working in a terminal window. His articles cover everything from mutt tricks to making Twitter connect over IRC to surviving hard drive crashes.
  • Point/Counterpoint Point/Counterpoint is the illegitimate love child of Bill Childers and Kyle Rankin. Written in a conversational style, it's one part knowledge, one part debate and two parts snide banter. From AJAX to Twitter, Mutt to Thunderbird, follow along as Kyle and Bill argue about topics and issues of the day.
  • Features With each issue, Linux Journal spotlights a focus topic (Security, Desktop, System Administration and so on). Articles within this special section feature or are written by the "who's who" of the sector and include interviews, overviews of emerging technologies, and information on useful Linux programs or projects. Look to Linux Journal's editorial calendar for upcoming Features.
  • InDepth LJ's InDepth section is what differentiates it from its competitors. In these articles, we dive deep into the technical details that our readers need to keep abreast of new technologies and move ahead in their careers. Recent topics have included performance tuning and performance management, new and emerging programming languages, and in-depth studies of important applications used by Linux professionals.
  • EOF Doc Searls, our resident celebrity writer and blogger, discusses the technical, management and social issues critical to the Linux community. Recent installments of Doc's popular back-page column have included emerging issues in Identity Management, cultural impediments to the adoption of Linux and open source by businesses and Digital Rights Management.
  • Paranoid Penguin Paranoid Penguin by Mick Bauer provides practical, hands-on security information that our readers can put to use in their jobs. Articles are written as tutorials for intermediate readers or explorations of advanced subjects for our more technical readers. Recent topics have included discussions on building transparent firewalls and Linux VPNs with OpenVPN.
  • diff -u Zach Brown discusses what's new in kernel development each month.
  • Product reviews Linux Journal provides comprehensive evaluations and the most trusted recommendations for buyers of Linux and open-source products and services. Featured in most issues are unbiased reviews of products that are new, useful and important within the Linux space. Reviews have appeared on new Linux servers, Linux-based clustering applications and a variety of cool Linux-based gadgets and devices.
  • upFRONT News and short summaries of interesting developments, important or just plain fun. Common topics include summaries of current activities in the kernel developer community, first looks at interesting new technologies or spotlights on people in the Linux and Open Source communities.
  • Fresh from the Labs In each issue, John Knight introduces readers to a few of the latest and greatest open-source projects currently available. He test drives the projects, reporting to readers detailed information about the installation procedure as well as discussing the potential best uses.
  • Work the Shell Industry-veteran Dave Taylor explores the power and capabilities of the humble shell, showing how to create and tweak common shell scripts and solve vexing admin problems. Not content with just offering up canned solutions, his column also commonly includes missteps he takes on the road to a solution, with explanations of what's broken and why. A must-read in every issue!

Articles in Linux Journal cover the range from desktop how-tos to kernel hacking, always balanced to give both newcomers and long-term Linux users maximum enjoyment. See our Web site for an author's guide and list of upcoming topics and deadlines: http://linuxjournal.com/author/index. If you have an idea for an article or have a lead for LJ, please e-mail ljeditor@linuxjournal.com or send inquiries to:

Editorial Dept.
Linux Journal
P.O. Box 980985
Houston, TX 77098 USA
Phone: +1 713-344-1956 x3
ljeditor@linuxjournal.com

We welcome your letters and encourage you to submit them on-line or mail them to:

Letters to the Editor
Linux Journal
P.O. Box 980985
Houston, TX 77098 USA

If you have a new or updated Linux product, please send us a press release, and we will consider it for inclusion in our monthly New Products column. Send new product information to:

New Products
Linux Journal
P.O. Box 980985
Houston, TX 77098 USA
Phone: +1 713-344-1956 x3
newproducts@linuxjournal.com

If you have news items you'd like us to mention on our Web site, please send press releases to news@linuxjournal.com.

Both print and on-line advertising options are available. For additional information, request a media kit and/or read more about advertising on our Web site. We encourage you to contact our sales department with questions and requests by calling +1 713-344-1956 x2 or by e-mail.

Authors may use the material with the restriction that if used immediately after LJ publication, they include the phrase "reprinted with permission of Linux Journal" in the reprinted article. Other people wishing to use material should contact LJ. Permission is usually granted free for non-commercial use, except where restricted by author or other prior copyright. For those looking for commercial reprints, please contact our sales department for further information.

Building on the strengths of the print publication Linux Journal, LinuxJournal.com is the most valuable on-line resource available to every member of the Linux community involved in the intelligent implementation of open-source software. The site features how-to videos, news, tech tips, community forums, in-depth reporting, blogging by industry icons, contests and much more.

LinuxJournal.com is built on the open-source Drupal content management system (CMS) and is lead by Webmistress Katherine Druckman. We encourage user feedback.

Each week, Linux Journal newsletters deliver the latest news and articles covering the fast-paced, ever-evolving world of Linux. There are multiple newsletters to choose from, and all are free of charge, opt-in only (never released to any third-party for any reason). For more information, please visit our newsletter sign-up page.

Linux Journal sponsors and attends a number of events throughout the year. If you're interested in a media sponsorship with LJ for your event, please contact associate publisher Mark Irgang. For a complete listing of Linux-related events, please visit http://www.linuxjournal.com/events.

If your question isn't answered here, send e-mail to publisher@linuxjournal.com. We will respond via e-mail, and if it is a common question, we will add it to this FAQ. If you don't have e-mail, give us a call, +1 713-344-1956.

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lenkelly's picture

This was NOT intended as a comment, but a question which I have emailed separately, and you have no delete entry option! (I guess it turns out to be a comment!)

email change

michaellewis's picture

I couldn't find how to change the email address I have on file to the new one. I created this account, thinking there would be some link.
Perhaps a button or link on a my account page to link subscription to email? Did I miss something? _Mike

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Mitch Frazier's picture

At the top of the page, "Your Account", then click on "Edit".

Mitch Frazier is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal.

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