Mounting ISO Files Without Burning CDs

FAIL (the browser should render some flash content, not this).

How to mount an ISO image from the command line.

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create iso image on mac

Anonymous's picture

If you want burn dvd to iso image file or create an iso image from dvd on mac,I share you below website:
http://www.xihalife.com/blogs/entries/17715.htm

Same or different for DVD?

Anonymous's picture

What would the command line be for mounting a DVD? The last time I tried mounting a few DVD/iso images already ripped to my hard disk, each command I found by googling failed (can't remember them any more).

Following the KISS principles...

Anonymous's picture

If you would rather not wait for the video (or if you would rather have something to copy and paste into your own local file), here is my summary of this video.

You need a place to mount the iso9660 file into. Or 'onto', if that is your view of mounting.

Open a terminal application, type these commands:
user@host:~$ mkdir foobu
That might not be necessary if you know of a different empty mount point.

Now, to actually mount the iso file:
user@host:~$ sudo mount -o loop -t /absolutepath/to/iso9660 foo.iso ./foobu
Password:

(or: user@host:~$ sudo mount -o loop -t ./relativepath/to/iso9660 foo.iso ./foobu). At the Password: prompt, you must enter the correct sudo password so the mount command can execute.

If you want to use the iso9660 at the commandline, type the following:
user@host:~$ cd ./foobu

There you are, in the root directory inside the iso9660 file.
Have at it!

When you have finished using the iso9660 file, again, open a terminal (or re-use the existing terminal) and type:
user@host:~$ cd ~
user@host:~$ sudo -umount ./foobu

For my distro, you must also enter the correct sudo password so that this second sudo command will execute.
I added the cd ~ part mostly for those situations where you were inside the iso9660 directory and tried to umount the iso9660... umount could fail because you, the user, might still have been inside the iso9660 directory. Similar failures of umount could occur if you were still using ANY program to access the iso9660, so be certain you close all application which were ever using files in that iso9660.

End.

iso9660 foo.iso should

Anonymous's picture

iso9660 foo.iso

should read

iso9660foo.iso

spurious extra space in the iso string.

Corrections to my comment....

Anonymous's picture

If you would rather not wait for the video (or if you would rather have something to copy and paste into your own local file), here is my summary of this video.

You need a place to mount the iso9660 file into. Or 'onto', if that is your view of mounting.

Open a terminal application, type these commands:
user@host:~$ mkdir foobu
That might not be necessary if you know of a different empty mount point.

Now, to actually mount the iso file:
user@host:~$ sudo mount -o loop -t /absolutepath/to/iso9660foo.iso ./foobu
Password:
(or: user@host:~$ sudo mount -o loop -t ./relativepath/to/iso9660foo.iso ./foobu). At the Password: prompt, you must enter the correct sudo password so the mount command can execute.

If you want to use the iso9660 at the commandline, type the following:
user@host:~$ cd ./foobu

There you are, in the root directory inside the iso9660 file.
Have at it!

When you have finished using the iso9660 file, again, open a terminal (or re-use the existing terminal) and type:
user@host:~$ cd ~
user@host:~$ sudo umount ./foobu

For my distro, you must also enter the correct sudo password so that this second sudo command will execute.

I added the cd ~ part mostly for those situations where you were inside the iso9660 directory and tried to umount the iso9660... umount could fail because you, the user, might still have been inside the iso9660 directory. Similar failures of umount could occur if you were still using ANY program to access the iso9660, so be certain you close all application which were ever using files in that iso9660.

End.

EDITS: July 23 2009: removed the space from within the file name (Linux has a hard time with Microsoftian philosophy) and after repeating the commands, I discovered the dash before the umount command was unacceptable).

True that. Sigh. I checked

Anonymous's picture

True that. Sigh.

I checked formatting, I checked html tags and then I checked again for idea sequence, and thought I had it all.

-space- tripped me up. Microsoft has trained me badly.

Thanks .. also if you don't

Faresko's picture

Thanks ..

also if you don't like command line or anyone ...

you can use Gmountiso it's easy

Mount an ISO image

Michael Eager's picture

Hi --

I always have trouble remembering the options for mount. So I use a loopback device:

$ sudo mkdir /mnt/CD
$ sudo losetup /dev/loop0 ubuntu.iso
$ sudo mount /dev/loop0 /mnt/CD

< access /mnt/CD as desired >

$ sudo umount /mnt/CD
$ sudo losetup -d /dev/loop0

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