LinkedIn's {py}gradle

To facilitate better building of Android apps, the technical team at LinkedIn has developed {py}gradle, a new powerful, flexible and reusable Python packaging system. Now available to the Open Source community, {py}gradle wraps Python code into the Gradle build automation tool so that developers can build Android apps more easily. more>>


Serious practitioners of data science use the full scientific method, starting with a question and a hypothesis, followed by an exploration of the data to determine whether the hypothesis holds up. more>>

Analyzing Data

My first Web-related job was in 1995, developing Web applications for a number of properties at Time Warner. When I first started there, we had a handful of programmers and managers handling all of the tasks. But over time, as happens in all growing companies and organizations, we started to specialize. more>>

Geek Guide: Machine Learning with Python

I first heard the term “machine learning” a few years ago, and to be honest, I basically ignored it that time. more>>

Recipy for Science

More and more journals are demanding that the science being published be reproducible. Ideally, if you publish your code, that should be enough for someone else to reproduce the results you are claiming. But, anyone who has done any actual computational science knows that this is not true. more>>

Using tshark to Watch and Inspect Network Traffic

Most of you probably have heard of Wireshark, a very popular and capable network protocol analyzer. What you may not know is that there exists a console version of Wireshark called tshark. The two main advantages of tshark are that it can be used in scripts and on a remote computer through an SSH connection. more>>

Doing Astronomy with Python

One of the things that makes Python so powerful is that you can find a module for almost anything. In this article, I cover Astropy, which was originally developed by the Space Telescope Science Institute for doing astronomy calculations like image processing and observatory calculations. more>>

General Relativity in Python

I have covered several different software packages for doing scientific computation in Linux Journal, but I haven't spent as much time describing available libraries and the kind of work that can be done with those libraries. more>>

New Products

Please send information about releases of Linux-related products to or New Products c/o Linux Journal, PO Box 980985, Houston, TX 77098. Submissions are edited for length and content.


In June 2013, we had the unfortunate luck of a basement flood, caused by a tripped electrical breaker connected to our sump pump. There are so many things that can go wrong with a sump pump. You always are on guard for power outages, blown breakers, sump pump failures, clogged pipes and all manner of issues that can arise, which ultimately can end with a flooded basement. more>>

Scientific Graphing in Python

In my last few articles, I looked at several different Python modules that are useful for doing computations. But, what tools are available to help you analyze the results from those computations? Although you could do some statistical analysis, sometimes the best tool is a graphical representation of the results. more>>

SciPY for Scientists

In my last article, I looked at NumPY and some of its uses in numerical simulations. Although NumPY does provide some really robust building blocks, it is a bit lacking in more sophisticated tools. SciPY is one of the many Python modules that build on NumPY's. more>>

Numerical Python

For the past few months, I've been covering different software packages for scientific computations. For my next several articles, I'm going to be focusing on using Python to come up with your own algorithms for your scientific problems. more>>

Using Django and MongoDB to Build a Blog

This article shows how to create a simple blog site using the MongoDB Document Database and the Django Web framework. more>>

Puerto Rico Python User Group Celebrates First Anniversary

One year ago the Puerto Rico Python Interest Group (prPIG) was founded on one purpose; to create a sustainable user community based on software development in Puerto Rico. On February 20, 2014 we will celebrate our first anniversary with an open format meeting with lightning talks from the community. more>>

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