Networking

smbclient Security for Windows Printing and File Transfer

Microsoft Windows is usually a presence in most computing environments, and UNIX administrators likely will be forced to use resources in Windows networks from time to time. Although many are familiar with the Samba server software, the matching smbclient utility often escapes notice. more>>

Hodge Podge

For every article, I try to write something that is interesting, entertaining, educational and fun. Sometimes I even succeed. Many other times I have some things I'd like to talk about, but there's not enough of it to fill the space. This time, I decided a disjointed hodge podge would be the theme. So let's just have a virtual nerdy talk about stuff, shall we? more>>

NETGEAR, Inc.'s GSS108EPP and GS408EPP Switches

Two new NETGEAR, Inc., Power-Over-Ethernet (PoE) switches feature a novel "Virtually Anywhere" mounting system that delivers modern high-power PoE+ to devices that others cannot. more>>

TRENDnet's WiFi Everywhere Powerline 1200 AV2 Access Point, Model TPL-430AP

TRENDnet recently released an innovative new solution that creates dead-spot-free home Wi-Fi by leveraging a home's existing electrical system. more>>

Understanding Firewalld in Multi-Zone Configurations

Stories of compromised servers and data theft fill today's news. It isn't difficult for someone who has read an informative blog post to access a system via a misconfigured service, take advantage of a recently exposed vulnerability or gain control using a stolen password. more>>

SNMP

How would you find out how much RAM is free on your Linux desktop? That's a really easy question with a lot of answers—free, any of the implementations of top and Glances all are valid responses. more>>

Papa's Got a Brand New NAS

It used to be that the true sign you were dealing with a Linux geek was the pile of computers lying around that person's house. How else could you experiment with networked servers without a mass of computers and networking equipment? If you work as a sysadmin for a large company, sometimes one of the job perks is that you get first dibs on decommissioned equipment. more>>

Applied Expert Systems, Inc.'s CleverView for TCP/IP on Linux

One of the most important characteristics of the contemporary data center, notes Applied Expert Systems, Inc. (AES), is that an ever-increasing amount of the traffic is between servers. Realizing the resulting need to facilitate improved server-to-server communications, AES developed CleverView for TCP/IP on Linux v2.5 with KVM Monitoring. more>>

The Tiny Internet Project, Part III

In a previous article, I introduced the Tiny Internet Project, a self-contained Linux project that shows you how to build key pieces of the internet on a single computer using virtualization software, a router and free open-source applications. more>>

Pancaking the Pyramid Economy

In 1937, Ronald Coase gave economics something new: a theory for why companies should exist. Oddly, this hadn't come up before. more>>

A New Mental Model for Computers and Networks

One of the great works of geekdom is Neal Stephenson's In the Beginning Was the Command Line, an essay-length book that came out in 1999. As with Linux, the code was open. Still is. more>>

The Peculiar Case of Email in the Cloud

Most of the time when I start a project, or spin up a virtual server, it's done in my own basement "server farm". Not too many years ago, if I wanted those services to be public, I'd simply port-forward from my static IP into my personal machines. Or, perhaps I'd set up a name-based virtual host as a reverse proxy if I needed to expose a Web app. more>>

The Tiny Internet Project, Part I

As LJ readers well know, Linux drives many of the technologies we use every day, from smart TVs to Web servers. Linux is everywhere—except most homes and classrooms. more>>

Hugh MacLeod's illustration of the Internet

The Giant Zero, Part 0.x

The first time I floated the "giant zero" metaphor for the Internet, was in my October 2007 "SuitWatch" newsletter for Linux Journal. more>>

What's Our Next Fight?

We won the battle for Linux, but we're losing the battle for freedom.

Linux turns 25 in August 2016. Linux Journal turned 21 in April 2016. (Issue #1 was April 1994, the month Linux hit version 1.0.) We're a generation into the history of our cause, but the fight isn't there anymore, because we won. Our cause has achieved its effects. more>>

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