Google

Beyond Google Reader: CommaFeed

Now that Google Reader is officially gone, most folks have settled on a replacement of some sort. In fact, a few months ago I even went through the process of installing Tiny Tiny RSS as a viable and powerful replacement. At the time, there was only one feature I sorely missed, the "next unread blog" link. more>>

The Google Giveth

And the Google taketh away. So it is with Google Reader. A while back, Google discontinued its Google Wave product, because it never gained traction as a social-media platform. This surprised approximately zero people. More recently, Google announced it would be closing Google Reader on July 1, 2013. Far more people were surprised, myself included. more>>

Android's Limits

Android is a lot more free than iOS, but there are limits. We need to break through those.

At its birth, Android was the horizontal and open solution to the problem of Apple's vertical and closed silo. On Android, hardware makers and software writers could build devices and apps, free to operate outside the walls of any vendor's closed garden. more>>

Dart: a New Web Programming Experience

JavaScript has had a long-standing monopoly on client-side Web programming. It has a tremendously large user base, and countless libraries have been written in it. Surely it is the perfect language with no flaws at all! Unfortunately, that is simply not the case. more>>

Chrome Extensions

Create applications inside the Chrome browser with standard Web technologies: HTML, CSS and JavaScript. more>>

Getting the Most from the Nexus 7

The ASUS/Google Nexus 7 arrived at my door on August 1, 2012 with a lot of anticipation from both me and the rest of the consumer electronics world. A quad-core Tegra 3 processor from NVIDIA, a 1200x800 HD IPS display covered with the latest scratch-resistant Corning Gorilla Glass and a 1.2 megapixel front-facing camera were among its most notable cool features. more>>

Switching to Chrom(ium)

For someone who works with, writes about and teaches cutting-edge technologies, I tend to be a bit of a laggard when adopting new ones. I upgrade my laptop and servers very conservatively. more>>

Introducing Grive

Earlier this year, Google introduced its Google Drive cloud storage service. more>>

Leaving the Land of the Giants

The next revolution will be personal. Just like the last three were. more>>

Looking Past Search

Can we make search organic again? Or should we look past search completely? more>>

Google Plus

The early years of the 21st century forever will be known as the age of social media. I don't know if that's something we should be proud of, but nonetheless, here we are. During the past decade, we've seen things like Friendster, Pownce, Twitter, Wave, Facebook, Tumblr, Buzz, Gowalla, Brightkite, Foursquare, Loopt, Plurk, Identi.ca, LinkedIn, Yammer and now Google Plus. more>>

Google Linux search suggestions

Google Inc. continues to make incremental improvements to web search, and in this vein, Instant search was added in 2010. For better or worse, the accompanying search suggestions cannot be disabled. This drop down list is intended to save time, but it also gives some clues about what other people are searching for. more>>

These little guys never tell me when they do something awesome

Android Sneaks Out An Awesome Gmail Upgrade

One of my biggest beefs with Gmail on my Droid (rooted, running Cyanogenmod 6.1.2) is that I could never reply with an address other than my gmail account. I have several accounts tied to gmail, and with the web client, you can choose which account to reply with. In fact, Gmail does a good job of replying with the address the email was sent to.

Except with Android. more>>

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