Review: Asus Eee PC

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The Asus Eee PC can work 10

Jack's picture

The Asus Eee PC can work 10 hours or more, is that true?

So I have a chance to pick one of these up with XP

Larsoze's picture

So my buddy's wife is unloading one of these for next to nothing. I fly a lot so I like the idea of having a netbook (right now I'm using a 15+ inch Lenovo) and primarily I'm running Office, and doing a little bit of graphic/web work. I'd like to upgrade the memory if possible - could I add something like this - or would that require major surgery to replace the hard drive?

Or maybe I should just try for a newer model...though I don't want to pony up the cash...Any thoughts?

good

Anonymous's picture

yes, Well, it runs the MeeOS of course! (Pronounced like a cat's meow -- why? Because I made it up, so I can have it sound that way if I want to) www.reqalke.com

asus eee901/linux xandros

Anonymous's picture

I purchased this little pc because its portable, sure, but mostly because I was tired of Windows constant updates and viral infections. Well, it is okay for email and web browsing but otherwise is pretty much useless. I cannot get it to do basic stuff that is so simple on Windows: saving mp3s and transferring them to a device, for example. On xandros, you can't even put a folder on the desktop--in fact, I'm not even sure it will let you make a folder anywhere! When I try to save something, it wants to "overwrite" existing files. Sheesh. You also cannot view an entire photo on it, only a small section of pictures is visible. It will not resize to fit like Windows does. The video player cannot be made to loop. You have to manually restart short clips. And the list goes on. I would advise anyone but the savviest hacker nerds to avoid this program at all costs, even if it means using the dreaded Microsoft or Mac software. This is truly a $400 junkpiece.

i got an asus eee pc laptop

Anonymous's picture

i got an asus eee pc laptop and i love it. i have a linux operating system! It has 8GB in memory. It is very fast. i got it about 2 days ago. Best laptop i have ever seen and used!!!

Can't wait to get one.

Mac Beach's picture

Well, I CAN wait, but I read a while back that there was going to be a model with an 8G flash. I have yet to see that and I decided to wait a while to see if it shows up and what the price difference is going to be.

I also think it would be great if they came out with a full-sized keyboard version of this. Whatever the form factor, a diskless, long battery life, Linux-based machine will fill the bill for many business users. No doubt one of these things is in my future.

Battery

Cen's picture

Your battery life measurement is absurd. I run my 4G eee's battery down from full to 10% warning atleast twice a day daily since I received it 2 weeks ago. I am clocking an average of 3 hours 20 minutes in default Xandros and 3 hours and 5 minutes in Windows XP Pro. Full brightness, heavy wifi usage, audio and video streaming.

I was thinking the same thing

Webmistress's picture

They have the 8GB version with 1GB RAM available for "pre-order" on Amazon, but I don;t know when it will actually ship. I too thought I'd wait for that one, but now I am thinking twice. I am not sure I need to spend the extra 100 bucks. I am wondering if I need that much power for this purpose. I don't plan on using this as my primary machine, or even necessarily as my primary laptop. I am not even sure I would even bother installing ubuntu or another distro, as it appears to have what I would actually use right out of the box.

So if the primary goal is low cost, I may just settle on the 512MB/4GB version. Anyone want to help me make up my mind? :) All input is appreciated.

Katherine Druckman is webmistress at LinuxJournal.com. You might find her on Twitter or at the Southwest Drupal Summit

This thing is amazing. It

Kimothy the Sage's picture

This thing is amazing. It would be absolutely perfect for me because all I ever do is mess around on the internet. I want one bad. This thing rocks my socks.

I have one!!

Anonymous's picture

I recieved one as an early Christmas present...it's wonderful!! I am a Linux "newbie". This is totally user friendly, fast to connect to Wi-Fi and anyone out there who wants that would be ecstatic, I assure you. It has lots of other cool features, like a built in web-cam and will save notes you write yourself..I say go for it.

Great!

Michelle's picture

The Asus Eee is my favorite device. I highly recommend it to anyone with a portable computing need. Specifically though, I would not recommend it as a full time use home computer unless the user is a child or an older person with reduced needs. It is an excellent portable second computer but is underpowered for home needs for most people. That being said, go out and get one, people! Asus has a winner here. It is a groundbreaking device, and maybe years from now will be on display at the Smithsonian. By then, laptops will come with 1TB flash drives, and 4GB of RAM will be standard (I hope). Take care and I hope this review was helpful to your buying decision.

Awesome!

Shawn Powers's picture

I'm curious, as someone new to Linux, does the stock Xandros operating system it comes with fit your needs and expectations? I suspect it's perfect for someone new to Linux, but I'd like to hear your perception.

Oh, and Merry Christmas. :)

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

mixed review

Brad C's picture

I enjoy the humor in the podcasts you make Shawn. I would have liked to see some screen shots of the laptop though.
A good close-up of the laptop keyboard and screen would help also. That way I could pause the podcast and compare the key layout to my current keyboard.

All in all I was entertained and I learned about a new product to wish for.

Good Jorb Dood!

Honestly...

Shawn Powers's picture

Even though it sounds like a "line" -- I purposefully made the review sorta light. Jes Hall is doing an in depth review of the EeePC in the print magazine, and I didnt' want to steal too much thunder from her. If I hadn't gotten the computer (early) for Christmas, I wouldn't have done a review at all, but I figured a little glimpse would be fun.

So I guess that means, make sure to pick up Jes' review when it hits newsstands. :)

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

You made up my mind

Brad C's picture

Alright you clinched it for me then. I picked up the current issue to ready your gaming article. I will just have to fill out the card and get a subscription.

Yay!

Shawn Powers's picture

That's awesome, Brad! I'll personally autograph every issue you receive. As long as you believe that my real name is "Linux Journal" and that I have really neat, block-like handwriting...

:)

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

Missing a lot :(

Anonymous's picture

Not bad, but it is somehow missing the point - if you do a VIDEO review the main point is NOT to make it self-promotion but instead you focus the camera ON THE PRODUCT - the most valuable things that you could bring with this yet-another-eee-review would have been actual images of you typing on that keyboard and side-by-side images with the device and some other notebook, eventually some images with the screen - which is awfully small and the first problem with the product, even before the keyboard - the keyboard is already as big as it can be in that size, but the device could EASILY have been fitted with a 10'' screen instead of the huge useless margins !!!

The reason the screen is

Anonymous's picture

The reason the screen is small is battery usage. The screen is the biggest user of power in a laptop, so smaller screen = less power usage = longer battery life.

The "Mee" PC?

Webmistress's picture

Here's a special "behind the scenes" look at our gadget guy :)

Katherine Druckman is webmistress at LinuxJournal.com. You might find her on Twitter or at the Southwest Drupal Summit

Can I Have Some Humble Pie With That?

Shawn Powers's picture

Unfortunately, when I was shooting the "MeePC" review, I fell into an unfortunate, and all to prevalent stereotypical assumption regarding my fellow Linux Journal writer, Jes Hall. Without thinking, I assumed "Jes", whom I've obviously never met, was indeed a man. If you listen closely to the end of the video, the "delivery person" unmistakably says over and over, "Mr. Hall, oh Mr. Hall..."

When I realized my mistake, I immediately emailed her an apology, but that doesn't make it any less tacky that I publicly skewed her gender. So Jes, again, I really do apologize for the unfortunate, and sadly stereotypical, mistake I made. I know that doesn't make it "all better" -- but I am genuinely sorry.

-Shawn

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

Nice does it do Linux ?

Russ3141596524's picture

It's obviously a closed source computer that probably doesn't come with any drivers. You'll have to throw it away if anything goes wrong. I don't see any mention of Linux either. What distro does it run?

OS

Shawn Powers's picture

Well, it runs the MeeOS of course! (Pronounced like a cat's meow -- why? Because I made it up, so I can have it sound that way if I want to)

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

Talk about an ultralight PC...

Gumnos's picture

I'm surprised that you didn't include a more detailed comparison of the two. The MEee PC puts the Eee PC to shame when it comes to weight, making the Eee PC seem like a box of bricks. Additionally, the MEee PC has much better battery life, maintaining full functionality far longer than the Eee PC. While neither is particularly biodegradable, the MEee PC does not require the same volume of toxic chemicals to produce.

Asus EEE PC 900

Anonymous's picture

Ugh, I don't know whether to love or hate Asus for releasing the Asus EEE PC 900. The Asus EEE PC 900 obviously is a better device, I just hate them for releasing it too early. I've only had my Asus EEE PC 701 for three months and now I'm itching to get the 900. Damn you, ASUS! :D

Nat of Gadget Info

PC 900

Ozsu's picture

Asus covers its laptops with a standard one-year parts-and-labor warranty, and it offers online Web-based help and a toll-free phone number. The company's support Web site includes the expected driver downloads and a brief FAQ but lacks useful features such as user forums or the chance to chat in real time with a technician.

Eee pc

Anonymous's picture

We own two of them now, my wife used mine and had to have one. We love them. The Wifi is fast and so extremely easy. Everything else just works. What it has is Xandros, and that looks much like a pc, only better and more stable. The battery lasts a very long time. The only problem is no cd drive, of course, you can put a USB one on. When I hook it up, I can use my USB keyboard, mouse and my monitor, and it sees my flashdrive and my 80 gig portable.

eee pc

Anonymous's picture

It is worth to buy a asus laptop battery, so cheap and beatiful, i like my eee pc very much.

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