The Latest

Chromium for the Masses

Every time my paycheck is direct-deposited, I contemplate purchasing a Chromebook. Long gone are the days of the CR-48 laptops with the clunky interface and frustrating usability. Although I never quite seem to pull the trigger and buy a Chromebook, thanks to the developer Hexxeh, it's possible to run the Chromium OS on a wide variety of hardware combinations. more>>

Extreme Graphics with Extrema

High-energy physics experiments tend to generate huge amounts of data. While this data is passed through analysis software, very often the first thing you may want to do is to graph it and see what it actually looks like. To this end, a powerful graphing and plotting program is an absolute must. more>>

APIs

If you're creating Web apps, you're designing APIs. Here are some things to keep in mind before you begin. more>>

Looking Past Search

Can we make search organic again? Or should we look past search completely? more>>

November 2012 Issue of Linux Journal: Python

Indiana was the Dog's Name

My wife is afraid of snakes. Actually, "afraid" may not be a big enough word. My wife is terrifyingly and abundantly mortified of snakes. more>>

Twitter Bootstrap

Even if you're not a designer, Bootstrap is a great way to make your sites look nice. more>>

There's an App for That

The concept of standalone Web apps isn't new. Anyone using Prism with Firefox or Fluid with OS X understands the concept: a browser that goes to a single Web site and acts like a standalone application—sorta. more>>

Getting Started with 3-D Printing: the Hardware

I've been interested in 3-D printers ever since I saw one at a Maker Faire a few years ago, but it was only a year ago when I started seriously thinking about having one of my own. At that point, I started to realize just how many different options existed and ultimately started researching the RepRap family of 3-D printers (more on the different printer families below). more>>

New Products

New products for October. more>>

Pluck Out a Novel with Plume

I often discuss the Linux port of Scrivener with my writer friend Ken McConnell. We both like Scrivener's interface, and we both prefer to use Linux as our writing platform. Unfortunately, the Linux port of Scrivener just doesn't compare to the OS X version. The other day, Ken told me about Plume Creator. more>>

Lightspeed on Your Desktop

One area of physics that is hard to wrap your head around is relativity. Basically, relativity breaks down into general and special relativity. General relativity deals with large masses and high energies, and it describes how space-time is warped by these. Special relativity deals with what happens during high velocities. more>>

PirateBox

The PirateBox is a device designed to facilitate sharing. more>>

Tarsnap: On-line Backups for the Truly Paranoid

Storing backups in the cloud requires a level of trust that not everyone is willing to give. While the convenience and low cost of automated, off-site backups is very compelling, the reality of putting personal data in the hands of complete strangers will never sit quite right with some people. more>>

Linux-Native Task Management? Check.

Task management programs are commonplace in our busy lives, but it seems that every system lacks something. Google Tasks is nice, but it lacks the features of a more robust task management system. Remember the Milk is nice, but it charges for some of its features. Many standalone task management programs are great, but they don't sync between devices. more>>

Artist's Guide to GIMP, 2nd Edition cover

Book Review - Artist's Guide to GIMP, 2nd Edition

 "One picture is worth a thousand words" stated Fred R. Barnard.  No quote could be quite as memorable as this nearly hundred year old one when it comes to GIMP. more>>

Drupal Special Edition

As Linux Journal's resident Drupal nerd, I could not be more pleased to bring you this special Drupal issue. Drupal really is everywhere these days, and it's available in more "flavors" than most people in the Open Source community are aware of. more>>

Ubuntu's New DNS: Unknown Host

If you're the type of person who installs Ubuntu's server edition, you're also likely the sort of person who knows how to configure network settings. For most distributions, especially those based on Debian, the process is a bit strange, but familiar. more>>

October 2012 Issue of Linux Journal: The Kernel

The Seats Are Bolted Down

One of my favorite Linux kernel analogies is that of an airplane losing altitude. In the movies, when a plane suffers damage, the brave hero rips off the door and starts throwing things out in order to lighten the load. Suitcases fly, bags of peanuts scatter and anything not bolted down goes out in order to save the passengers. more>>

ZaTab

ZaTab: ZaReason's Open Tablet

Quite a few options exist as far as Android tablets go. Some of them are great choices for personal entertainment and media consumption. Google's new Nexus 7 is a powerful little beast designed to serve up media from Google Play. Amazon's Kindle Fire is a great device for tapping Amazon's extensive content offerings. more>>

Non-Linux FOSS: AutoCAD Alternatives

Although AutoCAD is the champion of the computer-aided design world, some alternatives are worth looking into. In fact, even a few open-source options manage to pack some decent features into an infinitely affordable solution. more>>

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