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Openness is the Solution to the (Double) Subprime Crisis

As I listen to all this talk of lack of trust in the banking system, of inflated values ungrounded in any reality, of “opacity”, and of “contaminated” financial instruments, I realise I have heard all this before. In the world of software, as in the world of finance, there is contamination by overvalued, ungrounded offerings that have led to systemic mistrust, sapped the ability of the computer industry to create real value, and led it to squander vast amounts of time and money on the pursuit of the illusory, insubstantial wealth that is known as “intellectual property”. more>>

So how do you REALLY feel about DRM?

With all the talk about the new Android phone going around lately, we've been getting pretty excited about the new (DRM-free) Amazon mp3 store that will be prominently featured on the new phone. We got to thinking, and we'd really like to know more about how you feel about DRM.

Leave us some comments and feel free to elaborate.

There is greater evil than DRM, and I have mostly tolerated it up to this point 6% (81 votes) I am very opposed to DRM, but I have been known to purchase some "locked" material 28% (372 votes) I am vehemently opposed to DRM, and have never bought a single piece of DRM-controlled material 51% (689 votes) Who cares anyway, DRM's days are numbered. 15% (197 votes) Total votes: 1339

Mama Mia – Italian Blogs Just Got a Lot Hotter

Blogging is nothing new these days — it seems as if everyone and their grandma has a blog and is sharing whatever it is that winds them up with the world. more>>

Java Sound & Music Software for Linux, Part 3

With this installment I complete my survey of Java-based sound and music applications that run under Linux. Again I've focused mainly on production software. more>>

Linux Foundation Takes a Bite Out of Sun

If you thought the Linux Foundation was just about spreading Linux Love and giving Linus a place to hack, fasten your seatbelt, because the gloves have come off and they're sharing just what they think. more>>

Linux and FOSS in a Slowing Economy

In case anyone hasn't been paying attention, apparently the US economy isn't doing too well these days. There is a lot of news lately about banks failing, government bail-outs, and natural disasters that will cost us all a lot of money (thanks, Ike). more>>

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Linux Journal Live - Sept 25, 2008

See video

The September 25, 2008 edition of Linux Journal Live!. Associate Editor, Shawn Powers, and "Hack and /" columnist, Kyle Rankin, talk Google, Android, GACL, and the Large Hadron Collider. more>>

Adios Windows 9x

The upcoming release of Cygwin version 1.7 will be dropping support for Windows 9x (Windows 95, Windows 98 and Windows Me). If you're lucky enough never to have to use Windows, Cygwin probably seems like a waste of effort. But, if you're not so lucky, Cygwin is what keeps you sane. more>>

New GNOME in the Open Source Garden

It's that time again — yes, indeed the development cycle is up, and the good people behind the GNOME Desktop have just released a fresh version into the wild. more>>

Join us for Linux Journal Live! Thursday Evening

Join Editor Shawn Powers and columnist Kyle "Hack and /" Rankin this Thursday evening -- live! Ask questions, listen in... whatever you do just make sure to come join in the fun.

Where: http://www.linuxjournal.com/live more>>

Change Volume From a Bash Script

If you use ALSA for sound on your system the functions contained in the script presented here can be used to get and set the volume on your system. You might use this if you had a monitoring script running and wanted to raise the volume when you signal an alarm and then lower it again to the previous volume. more>>

G1

Android Walks Out of the Mist

The first phone to implement Google's Open Source Android mobile platform — the eagerly-anticipated T-Mobile G1made its maiden voyage today, launching to the expected fanfare and with the surprise appearance of Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin — on rollerblades. more>>

Monitoring Processes with Kill

If you have a process ID but aren't sure whether it's valid, you can use the most unlikely of candidates to test it: the kill command. If you don't see any reference to this on the kill(1) man page, check the info pages. The man/info page states that signal 0 is special and that the exit code from kill tells whether a signal could be sent to the specified process (or processes). more>>

Toshiba NB100 for Linux

It seems that lots of people are talking about Toshiba's NB100 mini-laptop but they are just talking about it appearing in the UK market in October. What The Register has to say is as good as any. more>>

Linux Foundation to Embrace Individuals With Open Arms

If you've ever thought about becoming a member of the Linux Foundation — the not-for-profit organization responsible, among other things, for keeping Lead Penguin Linux Torvalds a'coding — then you might know it's been a bit of an expensive proposition in the past. The door has been opened a bit wider for individuals, however, as the Foundation is now offering an individual affiliate membership for the low, low price of just one easy payment of $49 per year. more>>

Introducing: Simplify Media

Listen to Your Music, and Your Friends' Music, Wherever You Are more>>

GACL

Until Chrome came along, Google's Master Mobile Plan didn't quite add up. Now it does. Chrome -- Google's new superbrowser -- is cream on the top of a new mobile software stack. Let's call it GACL, for Gears, Android and Chrome on Linux. more>>

Cisco Buddys Up to Jabber

Cisco — rulers of all things network — have set their sights on something new, and they've gone out and gotten it. The it in this particular case is Jabber, Inc., the company responsible for building an enterprise offering around XMPP — the "Jabber" protocol — and the go out and getting happened yesterday, as Cisco announced that it intends to buy the 54-employee company before the end of next summer. more>>

Google Chrome . . . for Linux?!

As some of you know, Google released a new browser recently, something called Chrome. The idea is/was to fix everything that is wrong with browsers and make the Web browsers a tool to run applications. As opposed to just viewing Web pages. I'm being a bit silly here, but Chrome is built to be more like an operating system than a plain old browser. There's more but it's all only for Windows users since a Linux version doesn't yet exist. Wait . . . What? Check out this screenshost (click it for a full screen view). more>>

Linux a Loser, Says Symbian

The mobile phone industry is nothing if not cutthroat, with each manufacturer — not to mention provider — doing everything they can to show up and stomp out its competition. What isn't usually seen, though, is an old-fashioned public call-out. more>>