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What Went On While We Were Out

The weekend is over, the Giants won the Super Bowl, and most of us have gotten our tongues back in our mouths after Friday's announcement that Microsoft has a serious case of the hots for Yahoo. Now it's time for the wrap-up of what was going down while we were weekending. more>>

And Now For Something Entirely Different

Technology news isn't all mergers, acquisitions, and shakeups, sometimes it's porn and penis-enlargement email too. In an effort to provide balanced coverage of all things tech-wise, this afternoon is dedicated to the just-a-bit-different department. more>>

ICANN Has Had Enough of Playing Graceful with Scammers

It's not uncommon these days to run into an empty domain covered in ads, completely unassociated with what we expected to find. The cash cow may find itself on the barbecue soon, however, as the powers that be are planning to pull the plug. more>>

What happens if Microsoft buys Yahoo?

One's head spins thinking about Microsoft's unsolicited bid of $44.6 billion for Yahoo.

Yahoo has been a major figure in the open source world for a long time. It sponsors events, participates in countless development projects, and encourages its own engineers to do open source work. And, of course, it uses countless open source code bases as well. more>>

The Digital Convergence Transformation and Analog Hanging in There

Have you ever seen a $25,000 PC Card that hooks to a scanner to produce clean content used for forms? Some professional groups pay those kind of dollars so they can use EDI to speed up their collections. Call the filer a service provider and call the paper billing company a payer. So why does the payer make a provider kill trees to get paid? more>>

Ups and Downs were the Way of the Day

Just about all the big players had something in the news yesterday, though not all of them were having champagne moments. Just what was going on? We're glad you asked. more>>

Microsoft Tries To Slurp Up Yahoo

The tech world has been hearing rumblings and whispers that Microsoft wanted to add Yahoo to its fold, but now it's official: Big Evil wants it bad. more>>

Some assignments for Social Graph Foo Camp

Free thinking and free code have two things in common: a lot of the best work has already been done, and we can re-use it.

That's my second challenge to ers. The first is getting some clarity about what the "social graph" means in the first place. more>>

Writers with Technical Background Needed or Not

One year ago, I stuck my resume up on Dice and Monster expecting to find a nice job as a system administrator. I wrote a decent resume, outlined my abilities and accomplishments and waited to see my cell phone light up with calls. Nothing happened. I went to both job boards and saw that I had a few hits. I seem to remember about four hits on each board for a total of eight hits. more>>

Eeny, Meeny, Miney, Xubuntu...

I know that about six billion people have compared and contrasted the differences between the Ubuntu variants. Really, the choice comes down to personal preference, and usually it comes down to the classic Gnome vs KDE war. more>>

Fun With the VMware Workstation

Enough of this reading about virtualization, I'm just gonna do it already! To get my feet wet, I installed the 30-day free trial of VMware Workstation for my Ubuntu 7.10 system, hoping to have several guest OSes on my primary Linux desktop. I must say, so far I am quite impressed! more>>

Ruport Book Released

The Ruport Book Project has announced that they’ve begun shipping pre-orders of their book. The primary authors, Gregory Brown and Michale Milner, are core developers of the Ruport reporting system for Ruby as well. more>>

No, Linus Can't Come To the Phone Right Now

It's always fun when Linus Torvalds — the originator and Grand High Developer of the Linux kernel — grants an interview, an altogether not-too-common occurrence, to be sure. On the occasion of Australia's Linux.conf.au, the Great One has granted an audience to Computerworld, and the results proved rather interesting. more>>

Good Bill, Bad Bill, and The Art of Philanthropy

There's no doubt that 2008 will go down in history as the end of the first Microsoft era. This year, Bill Gates will finally hang up his Microsoft mouse and leave the company he cofounded over 30 years ago. Most people know that he's going off to spend the very large sums of money he has acquired from those Microsoft years, most of which has been used to set up the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation with $37.6 billion in assets. But what will that really mean for free software? more>>

The Internet is Down, so is Microsoft, but Not the 'Fox

Wednesday was a bad day in the Middle East and beyond, and 'twas almost as bad for Big Evil, while Firefox landed some good news. Let's get to it, the game is afoot! more>>

Readers' Choice Awards -- Still Time to Vote

Linux Journal's 2008 Readers' Choice Awards survey has received over 3,000 votes thus far. Polls will remain open through February 14th, 2008. If you've not yet casted votes for your Linux and Open Source favorites, visit the survey today, http://www.linuxjournal.com/node/1006101/. more>>

Kubuntu On My Shiny New Laptop

My shiny new Dell XPS M1330 arrived on Monday, so you might say my week got off to a good start. more>>

Interview With Mandriva CEO, François Bancilhon

Linux Journal recently caught up with Mandriva CEO, François Bancilhon, to find out more about a recently announced partnership between Mandriva of France and Turbolinux of Japan. more>>

Microsoft, MySpace, and Pirates, Oh My!

There's plenty atwitter on the newswire today, some funny, some frightening, and some that just bears repeating. On your mark, get set, here goes! more>>

Journalism in a world of open code and open self-education

Think about the differences between stories and facts. Between generating interest and pursuing knowledge. Between grabbing attention and building out what we know. Then think about the connections between the freedom to build code and the freedom to inform one's self and others. Because the former is a model for the latter. more>>

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