What is your favorite scripting language?

Which language reigns supreme? This is the question that seemed to create the most controversy in our Readers' Choice poll this year so we thought we'd have some fun and open it up to the public to discuss. (This is better than a vi vs. emacs war!) Cast your vote.

Update: Phil Hughes writes Is Lua Really Wonderful. Make sure to check it out.

Python
32% (1244 votes)
Perl
19% (757 votes)
PHP
13% (506 votes)
Lua
2% (76 votes)
Ruby
9% (370 votes)
AWK
2% (71 votes)
bash
15% (580 votes)
Other (comment below)
8% (297 votes)
Total votes: 3901

Comments

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Odd choices

Rich's picture

And for a follow-up poll: "What's your favourite command? ls, ypcat, or vim?" Silly.

Anything that gets the job

David Soyland's picture

Anything that gets the job done. bash for simple things, python for anything that needs true system programing or cross platform(i.e winblows), and php for the web. it all about picking the right tool for the job.

Tcl/Tk

Anonymous's picture

Tcl/Tk

Tcl

Anonymous's picture

Tcl

Seems to be a rather narrow

Anonymous's picture

Seems to be a rather narrow -- and odd -- set of choices.

Tcl/Tk

Sean Woods's picture

Not to be a jerk, but how could you miss the script language of Expect AND that comes embedded on Cisco routers, AND comes standard in every release of BSD, OSX, with virtually every distribution of Linux produced. And yes, every distro going back to the stone age.

Tcl/Tk

Saedelaere's picture

Tcl/Tk

Tcl

Anonymous's picture

I find Tcl to be a much friendly solution than any of the ones on the list now.

Groovy.

Anonymous's picture

Groovy.

me too

alex bongoman's picture

Groovy (jvm), Boo (.net), Scheme and for the absence of any of those Ruby. Then again it's tempting to say C using either an interpreter or slotting in TCC.

Which do I use most rather than being my favorite? Python followed by Ruby (work use then home use respectively).

Tcl/Tk

Anonymous's picture

Tcl/Tk

CL?

Leslie P. Polzer's picture

Where's Common Lisp? Oh wait, is it a scripting language?

Scripting on Steroids

Steve Rogers's picture

Lisp is a scripting language in the sense of providing unsurpassed support for exploratory programming. Emacs Lisp is obviously a scripting language. CL seems strange, big, and scary at first acquaintance, but gets the job done when you get past that. CL is more industrial strength than the popular scripting languages, but is harder to pick up for a quick scripting task if you're not already immersed in it.

BTW, I voted for Python, which is a lisp for the rest of us with the exception of the "code is data" nature of Lisp's S-expression syntax.

Preferences

Matt.'s picture

I most definitely prefer Ruby due to it's flexibility for both system administration scripting and for the Rails framework, however Python is my ever-reliable second preference and due to it's proliferation on most of our production servers it's the language I do resort to scripting in more often than not.

The term 'scripting language'

Jamie Bullock's picture

I'm really starting to dislike the term 'scripting language'. Some of these languages are so much more than _just_ a scripting language.

javascript/ecmascript

evaisse's picture

Strangely, one of the few 'standardized' scripting language is missing : javascript AKA ecmascript

... was wondering where JS was

Anonymous's picture

... not to mention that it's probably used more than all the survey choices combined and probably even a few multiples of that total.

Tcl

Bart van Deenen's picture

Tcl is pretty good for embedding within C.

Fixed!

Webmistress's picture

Sorry the poll went wonky! I fixed it :) Plase feel free to email me anytime you see something go wrong here at LinuxJournal.com. I am never very far from my email.

Happy voting, and thanks for the comments!

Katherine Druckman is webmistress at LinuxJournal.com. You might find her on Twitter or at the Southwest Drupal Summit

python

Joe Chiang's picture

python

favorite scripting language

anon's picture

Perl

perl I try to use Ruby, but

Anonymous's picture

perl
I try to use Ruby, but I run to Perl when I am in a hurry. Bash is surprisingly useful, but it is still best used to wrap functioning code for logging, running jobs etc.

Haskell

dino's picture

Haskell is a polymorphically statically typed, lazy, purely functional language.

It can be compiled into binary or used as a scripting language with #!.

It's fantastic and fun.

bash,perl and php and some python

cybersekkin's picture

come on don't make me pick a favorite.

PHP for web development,

CptnObvious999's picture

PHP for web development, BASH for quick system admin tasks, and Python for everything else. 'nuff said.

Tcl

Anonymous's picture

Tcl is very flexible and perfect for GUI, sockets, regexp, etc for both quick scripting and full applications development.

How to vote?

travisjeffery's picture

How to do we vote? Mine is Perl though.

Link to vote is ...

Nanjundi's picture

You should be able to see the choices here.

http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/what-your-favorite-scripting-language

-N

Absolutely no idea. Not

jlh's picture

Absolutely no idea. Not much of a poll or it might just be a poll taken internally.

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