Spotlight on Linux: Slackware Linux 13.1

People sometimes ask which distribution to try if they want to learn how Linux works. Common answers are Gentoo, Arch, or Debian. However, I disagree. Each of these distros teach users their particular brand of Linux. There's only one truly pure Linux, and that is Slackware.

Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distribution. In its early years, Patrick Volkerdin rolled up a kernel, init, libraries, desktop, and applications to make Linux easier for users. And that's still what he is doing today. He doesn't change anything, he doesn't customize anything. Every component is exactly how the original developers intended. For example, users get a vanilla kernel and default desktop configuration.

Version 13.1 was released May 25 with Linux 2.6.33.4 and KDE 4.4.3. Slackware ships with other desktop options, such as Xfce 4.6.1, and lots of handy software. As expected, it comes with Web browsers, office applications, multimedia software, personal communication tools, image management, and more. Slack usually includes Java, but most other browser plugins and multimedia codecs are left to the user to install. 13.1 still uses HAL and udev in order to grant users access to removable media without root privileges or sudo. Along those same lines, this release also brings ConsoleKit and PolicyKit to allow even more convenience in running the system without elevated permissions. This release should be easy to use for users of any experience.

Slackware's original package management system - or software installer and uninstaller - neither resolves dependencies nor downloads from online repositories. However, some third-party attempts came along to address this and one, slackpkg, has recently been added to Slackware to bring the same capabilities as APT on Debian and Debian-based distributions. However, if you install the full range of packages on the Slackware install DVD, there isn't much extra on official mirrors. That's why some recommend the community repository hosted by slackbuilds.org. Between slackpkg and slackbuilds, Slackware has moved into the 21st century of software management.

Once upon a time Slackware was a favorite because of its hardware configuration method. In the tradition of keeping it simple, it had one file that users needed to edit (for most purposes). Most drivers were listed and users just uncommented whichever was used by their hardware. But even that isn't necessary anymore. Just like any other distro today, most hardware is automagically detected and configured.

Finally, the installer is another area of Slackware that gets some negative comments from time to time. It isn't very pretty by today's standards and it is keyboard driven, but it isn't difficult to use. It asks a few questions during the process in a similar manner as other Linux installers. Perhaps the most difficult aspect is the need to partition your disk prior to beginning the install setup. The installer disk comes with fdisk and cfdisk for this purpose.

So, all in all, besides the partitioning requirement and the lack of multimedia support, Slackware is just as up-to-date and easy-to-use as any Linux distribution. Like a split personality, today's Slackware is steeped in tradition yet surprisingly modern.

Advantages:
1. True Linux experience
2. High Performance
3. Extremely stable

Disadvantages:
1. Off-putting partitioning and installer
2. No live CD/DVD
3. Still uses Lilo for boot management
4. Lacks multimedia codecs

______________________

Susan Linton is a Linux writer and the owner of tuxmachines.org.

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My Choice of Linux Distros

Anonymous's picture

To all Slackware enthusiasts and salckware geeks, keep the hope alive so that one day slackware will have a live CD/DVD for newbies to try.

95% of Americans will not walk more than 200 yards going to a mall or shop. In same aspect, most newbies who do not have enoough time to try out the enchanted geeks discoursing on this version o'er the other.

I have-- in recent months -- tested several versions of live Linux distros. I have to say that I am extremely excited to say that Linux Mint 9 and Zorin made a positive impression so that I might switch one of my old PC's OS. Here is how I rated:
#1 Windows XP - SP3
#2 Linux Mint "Isadora" 9
#3 Zorin
#4 Mandriva One
#5 Ubuntu / Kubuntu 10.04 LTS
#6 Puppy
#7 Qwerky
#8 CentOS 5.0

OpenSUSE 11.2/XFCE, just like Slackware, was not a live CD hence I did not test it. Similarly, netbooks like meeGo and JolliCloud are useless as it require pre-login into internet-based system or prior to installing a try out OS.

I had hard time installing Printer on all versions of Linuxs. Short of that I like what I see. But then, Chrome/Google OS, Windows 8, and Apple OS are entracnhed OSes difficult to get rid-off easily.

If anyone has different opinion in Linux selection# please post.

Finally, how do I host VMware on Win98. I am trying old printer (which was based on Graphics Device interface "GDI" technology by Xerox (DocuPrint P8). On Linux boards I read that it is too complicated to made driver for just one (but quite widely sold home laserjet printer) printer.

Any suggestion is appreciated in advance.

Slackware, the tuners ponography

Anonymous's picture

Eye-candy, dependencies check, grub, .... What is it all about ? The best of Linux is that it offers a choice. A choice to pick what you like.
Its just like getting a new ca. If you just need a car,you pick one on color and off you go to do some shopping.
If you are a car fanatic, you test some cars and get the one you likes most.
but if you are a tuner, you get a car,through out what you do not like and install stuff you do like. When it seems something does not fit, or something feels not right: customize it. That is the spirit of Slackware, it's the tuners' pornography.

Not everyone is a tuner, not everyone is a car fanatic.

I hate dependencies. I really do. Yes it is easy to use when installing software. BUT it can be a pain in the butt then uninstalling stuff. Upgrading one single package with apt-get ? feeling lucky Punk ?

Slackware is not the answer nor is it the question. It is a choice. Complaining about Slackware being 18th century only means that someone did not get the point of Linux. This naturally rises the quest for the point of Linux. ...

Well simply ask yourself, what kind of car do i want ?

EOF

Slackware as a Bridge

FredR's picture

Slackware, for me, has always been a bridge. When I first started learning about computers, I really enjoyed Unix, it made complete sense to me. My initial exposure to it was in the form of BSD and Solaris. I had this feeling of "too bad I can't play with this at home, guess I will always need to use it on a server at work or through a university shell account".

Then when I realized I could get Unix at home, and it was called Linux, that was fantastic! I began by downloading all the floppies for Slackware (around 3.0 I think). What a great idea, I can take an old spare machine, one I've just upgraded from, and install this Linux thing and learn all about it. I even bought some of those cheapbytes CDs you can pay $5 for and get in the mail, so now I had debian, redhat and slackware to play with. There was no experiment I couldn't try, no protocol or application outside of reach.

These days, most of my machines are debian based (ubuntu on laptops) or redhat/centos. I still run Slackware as my main machine because it pretty much runs like it did back then. If I want to try something new, or uninstall a package and compile my own version (and repackage it up) I can. I won't break anything typically.

My slackware machine is a server to host guest vms of many different distributions. Need a centos or debian machine? No problem, just fire up a guest vm.

I've actually become quite fond of Arch because it follows along the same path that Slackware, BSD and Solaris did. It's quickly becoming one of my favorite pet guest vms.

I like the guy who commented that Slackware was a specialist distro. He's mostly right. I have it specialized for my machine at home. It has a unique purpose and it does that quite well. In fact, one of my guest vms is a Slackware 13.1 machine so I can use _that_ as the guinea pig, seeing as the host machine is "too important". I can try risky ideas in a sandbox environment, and if something blows up, I haven't lost much.

Oh and I can compile my own versions of KVM without having to wait for the person who maintains the package for my distro to update. I'm to the point where I keep a few versions of my most important apps (in the form of packages of course) if something does go awry.

I agree, it's not for everyone. I have some unique experiences. But, for the folks who start out with other distros like Debian, Ubuntu, or Redhat, and find themselves drifting more towards a BSD-style distro, Arch and Slackware are there waiting.

It never hurts to play with all the toys in the playground.

-- FLR or flrichar is a superfan of Linux Journal, and goofs around in the LJ IRC Channel

The Truth

staticcola's picture

As much as I'd like to agree with everyone I can't.

Problems in Slack:
#1 Beta Office software.
The real selling point for me was having all the software I needed and source code available. This is not the case with 13 or 13.1. Koffice is a pile of shit right now and why they keep including it I don't know. Even the website says not to use it.

#2 SlackBuilds
Alienbob writes his so that it downloads the source and builds everything for you.
http://connie.slackware.com/~alien/slackbuilds/amaya/build/amaya.SlackBuild

This Slackbuilds.org does no such thing. Rob and Bob are the two people I see that it seems Pat likes to trust but apparently there is some type of mixed up relationship here. I think Bob has the right idea about automation. Rob should follow and Pat should include more software.

Package Management:
Somebody has to package your deb archives. They aren't magically generated. control.tar.gz, data.tar.gz compiled up into an AR file. 'ar' is used to make libraries. Then you have the actual file that set's the dependencies with in the control.tar.gz. So you got a package within a package which seems like a waste to me.

Slackware you just have at a minimum one tar.gz with the file hierarchy, for instance; /usr/lib/firefox <-- all the usual files
You can just tar vxf file.tar.gz -C / and you get your product installed.

Well they did go to a new archive application, LHA, XZ or something.

The real problem is setting dependencies in a deb. It seems like a real pain to track down the meta name for an application or library. But there are automated tools like checkinstall that will create both.

Nobody every wins and nothing is gained

In short I think most people have already gone to Ubuntu because the old regime is dead. Long live the King the King is dead.

RIP Slackware We had some great times together back in 98 when you almost sunk my college career. :)

Slackware is for specialists.

Paul Harper's picture

First I am a Debian user. I find that for me I can do things a lot faster on a Debian system than I can with Slackware because of the package management system.

However I have a friend who is a serious music programmer. He finds that compiling the latest version of Ardour works better on Slackware than it does on Ubuntu. So his music computer runs Slackware and other computers run Ubuntu.

My view is Slackware is meant for a specific type of user with specialist needs.

I would also say Slackware has great documentation and a friendly community provided you ask sensible questions.

Finally saying "Lacks multimedia codecs" is nonsense. Like most free software distro's is supports 'FREE" codecs but not 'PROPRIETARY' codecs. This is for obvious reasons and should be well known to someone writing an article on Linux. Debian, Fedora, OpenSuse and Ubuntu are the same.

The diversity of Linux disto's is a benefit not a curse as the FUD from Redmond would have you believe. You can choose the one that best suits your needs.

Also, I thought it was the

Anonymous's picture

Also, I thought it was the only distro to include MP3 out-of-the-box.

Slackware 13.1 does nothing

Anonymous's picture

Slackware 13.1 does nothing that Slakware 13 can't do and it does some things worse. Get Slackware 13.

Agreed

Oh I just love slackware

Le Hoang Long's picture

Oh I just love slackware because of all these so-called "useless worst of time writing and reading"
It will take you a lot of time at first but on the next time you will spend a very small time on the same problem. all thing you need to do is " for example press enter key" and all things will automaticaly run .
we don't want to do the same point and click every time.

I Miss Slackware

jongkako's picture

Slackware is my 1st distro when im start using Linux. but after a few distro and live cd have make me more easier with desktop, slowly i leave slackware. but i still miss slackware. slackware my first love.

This is why...

techguy's picture

Reading everyone's comments reminds me of why Linux will never be king. Everyone has a right to his or her favorite distribution that is what makes linux wonderful. It's your choice of what distribution/features to use, do we have that with MS? I don't think so.

If you bash a distribution then take the time to improve it. Working on projects/distributions improves linux and foss in general, and builds a stronger community.

If your not willing to help then, you know what they say opinions are like ***holes, everybody has one.

And most of them stink!

Anonymous's picture

And most of them stink!

Salckware 13.1

Anonymous's picture

Slackware 13.1 does nothing that Slakware 13 can't do and it does some things worse. Get Slackware 13. There seems to be a pattern here. Maybe it is just my ati card but the latest ubuntu and fedora also seem to be retrograde steps.

Slack was my first and most

Christofer's picture

Slack was my first and most stable distro until now,after i configured everything correctly and installed all the programs I wanted I couldn't find anything more stable. With slack I really learned how most things in linux work as it keeps it simple and clean. The only problem I see is the installer and/or the partitioner,I believe a choice could be added to use either graphical or text so that it wouldn't stay so far behind in its share of users it has.

slackware13.1

Anonymous's picture

The 13.1 is well chosen. For me the proprietary ati driver will not install , the suggested vesa driver does not seem to run at 144x900 and the default free ati driver is ridiculously slow. I have installed 13.1 but I think it will be coming off my hard drive. I'm glad I didn't try to upgrade my Slackware 13. Maybe try 14.0 some day.
Well at least it installed , with the latest ubuntu the installer crashed on me.

This barely-a-cribnote is not

Anonymous's picture

This barely-a-cribnote is not fit to be called an article. But you Slackware boys better get used to the criticism because Canonical is going to keep driving home the baloney that Ubuntu is Linux. That's what the Windows diaspora think anymore.

The installer's not pretty enough? That's such an ignorant comment it beggars belief. The installer is perfectly functional, if you're not a complete doofus. And if you are you shouldn't be using Linux anyway; you'll only delete your home directory's contents.

By the way, a few days ago a colleague of mine watched as three very important files disappeared from his ext4 root filesystem. Thank the Fates that he was backing up to an ext3 filesystem and had copies. Way to go Ubuntu, that's real stability. Thanks for your pretty installer though.

Trash

Slakker's picture

The writeup is crap. Read people who know what they are talking about: http://www.xstore.co.za/wordpress/?p=733

v0.96

Rémy's picture

I started to learn Linux with Slackware at its early version 0.96
Back in the 90'...

Not so "easy of use" but it's still the best with Linux from scratch for nuts and bolts.

And still the best distro if you want to exactly manage what's in your kernel.

From Toulouse.

PAM!!!

No Slacking!'s picture

Another disadvantage ... or advantage???

No PAM
Perhaps there is truth in what Patrick Volkerding believes - that PAM is the cause of many security griefs. But PAM does make life easy ;)

No GNOME
There are a couple of 3rd party GNOME offerings for slackware.

Easy to fix all the disadvantages though...

remove lilo, install grub
install codecs
install pam

Use SLAX for live CD/USB

But ... it is snappy on my Compaq EVO N160

Wow, this passes for content

Anonymous's picture

Wow, this passes for content now _by_Susan_ and _at_LJ_? Hey I love Slackware as much as the next person but we all know the experience is slightly more than even hinted at here.

We use it because it sets us free by allowing us control of our own systems and because it's both solid and spry. There are prices for that and we start to pay at installation. What if, for example, a user does not Want to install Everything--what's that experience like? Control takes knowledge and knowledge takes time. Brew some tagfiles. Install a few times. Read. Use scripts to ape old package lists and brew new tagfiles. Or sit and sit and sit and sit and choose packages.

The offspring of Slackware are the gateway drugs--anything else is going to require a bit of time and responsibility. That's a more than fair trade and I'm grateful to have the option--just don't kid anyone it's different.

Wow, this passes for content

Anonymous's picture

Wow, this passes for content _by_Susan_ and _at_LJ_? We've come to expect more than a pass at a look. Hey--I love Slackware as much as the next person, but we all know there's slightly more to the Slackware experience than even hinted at.

What if, for example, you don't Want to install everything from the dvd--what's that installation experience like?

We use it because it sets us free by allowing us to control our own systems. It just works, it performs well, and it's solid. There are prices for that and we pay right at the front door when choose our selection of packages or brew a set of tagfiles.

Oh Wow...

Anonymous's picture

Slackware partitioning and installer are "off-putting"? I do agree that it "looks" old fashioned, with the text based graphics and all, but otherwise the installer is no more complicated than any other I've ever seen. It does allow for you to choose a more customized and complex installation, which will confuse an inexperienced person if they go that route. But, to just take the recommended defaults is no more difficult than any other distro. Just doesn't look as slick as most currently do.

As for the partitioning, that's the main reason I've always preferred Slackware. I want to control how the hard drive is set up. I can't stand it when some "auto installer" writes the boot loader into the MBR. Boot loaders belong in a partition boot sector, not the MBR as far as I'm concerned. But every other distro now just writes it to the MBR regardless of what you, the user, wants.

There are things about Slackware which are a PITA, and there are obvious advantages in many of the currently more popular distros. But, the complete control of partitioning and installation that Slackware allows is a major advantage, not a disadvantage.

salix, vector, or others

lighans's picture

Well, if there are people finding it hard to install Slack itself, you can always choose for his children. Salixos.org stays very close to its father, where zenwalk and especially vectorlinux add more of their own saucage to it.

I see Slackware as a very stable base for these distributions.

I think a lot of people

Anonymous's picture

I think a lot of people missed the point. We don't use Slackware because it is the easiest. Nor do we care which distro is best for the lazy or don't-want-to-know crowd. If I am installing a piece of software and it wants to pull in KDE or Gnome as a dependency, then I want to look for something else that will do the job. Other distros would just pull in all of the dependencies. Thankfully we have choices in Linux and different versions for different levels of users.

Disadvantages?

aprogrammer's picture

I disagree.

fdisk and cfdisk are both straight forward, menu driven, and easy to understand. By comparison, I find most of the "easy partioners" offered by other distros' "modern installers" be tedious and cumbersome, requiring far more 'clicks' than fdisk requires key strokes to create a solid 4 partition scheme (boot, root, home, and swap). The only advantage these graphical partitioners offer is the newbie "whole-disk default" option each invariably gives.

The installer is likewise menu driven and easy to understand. The process of setting up lilo could use some improvement, but at the same time also offers more control of the configuration than other distros. Lilo (IMO) is also simpler and less cryptic than grub, using standard device names and one file for configuration (compared to, say, the 146 in a typical Ubuntu 9 grub dir).

Slackware doesn't need a 'live' image. SLAX already provides this quit nicely.

As already pointed out by others, Slackware offers no shortage of multimedia playback support out of the box, with exception of CSS encrypted DVDs. However, a quick google search and 3 commands resolves this easily.

The one thing that Slackware truly lacks is an easy upgrade path. Each release must be installed over the previous one. However, this is easily resolved by keeping /home on a separate partition (goes a long way to preserve one's configuration between systems), and backing up /etc.

On the package front, Slackware does force one to install "non-free" software manually (e.g. Flash). Whether this is good or bad, however, depends on one's point of view.

Bad title..

archnub's picture

The title of this article should really be, "Slackware. A blast from the past!"

There is a reason that 95% of the Distro's out there have "moved on" from the Slack way of doing things. Not saying its right or wrong, but Linux has evolved in a big way. I see the value in running a lean clean system as I usually run ArchLinux, but when all is said and done, there really is not a big enough gain in terms of resources gained over time spent in configuring your system to make it worth the headache with these types of Distros. Linux will continue to evolve and I think the real question should be, what is going to happen to niche distro's like Slack? Sure, Slack will continue to hold its core group of fanatics (as all the major Distros do), but that core group in Slack is getting smaller and older, while Distro's like Ubuntu and Fedora get the masses and continue to grow every day.

i don't agree

Le Hoang Long's picture

I think I am young.
I am 26.
and I love the way of slackware doing

I'm also 26 years young and

Anonymous's picture

I'm also 26 years young and love slackware since the beginning and swear by it.

Learned the most on Slackware

Adam Backstrom's picture

I got my start on RedHat back in 1997-98, but I definitely learned the most on Slackware in the years that followed. It really laid the groundwork for my understanding of the traditional Linux filesystem structure, shell scripting, compiling/package building, and probably a hundred other things I just take for granted now.

Time matters

Ex-slacker ver.8-11's picture

Several years ago Slackware was de-facto the best distro. Then programs were less, simpler, dependencies, if any, were easily resolved.
Today at the days of crazy acceleration for software development, when tons of programs emerge every day, driving tons of dependencies behind, using Slackware is nuisance.
Time is precious to lose it recklessly on configurations and updates of a distro.

Time is precious!

Anonymous's picture

Do you really think the distro hoppers who make up the majority of Linux acolytes give a tinker's damn about time being precious? If you think your time is precious you should be using one of the BSDs.

Remember, when you're really cool it's important to release 10.10 on 10.10.10. The hell with the users's experience. Remember, with Slackware you get it when it's ready. Not before.

And by the way, LILO rocks; it could do bootable RAIDed root partitions looong before GRUB could, and it still is easier to see what it's going to do than it is with grub. (Not that the "Apple sucks" Linux fashionistas care).

Dependencies...

STE's picture

Dependencies is still a problem with package management. My colleagues at work are using Ubuntu, and certain features of applications are not easy to get working in this environment either. The reason is that when locking dependencies you cannot upgrade to latest (bug fixed) version automatically, and thus you still have to do know more than drag-and-drop.
With Slackware I do have the same problem but find it reasonably easy to tweak Slackbuilds or src2pkg into packages myself and then compare versions of applications.
I try to avoid use of "configure; make; make install" as it may ruin some vital file for other applications or system.

This of course goes beyond most users experience level, but is definitely worthwhile if you need to fix application bugs or dependencies.

Has multimedia codecs

Not Bob's picture

Actually Slackware does include multimedia codecs.

Xine, and by extension, dragon and gxine, can play most formats, including mp3, wmv, mpeg4-asp (Xvid/DivX), H.264, ...... MPlayer is also included without decss support.

Madplay, and mpg123 both decode mp3 streams, and other programs hook into these for decoding.

Not to mention Xmms, and Audacious.

Of course the free formats (ogg, flac, wavpack, and theora) are support.

Has multimedia codecs

Not Bob's picture

Actually Slackware does include multimedia codecs.

Xine, and by extension, dragon and gxine, can play most formats, including mp3, wmv, mpeg4-asp (Xvid/DivX), H.264, ...... MPlayer is also included without decss support.

Madplay, and mpg123 both decode mp3 streams, and other programs hook into these for decoding.

Not to mention Xmms, and Audacious.

Of course the free formats (ogg, flac, wavpack, and theora) are support.

Steep setup curve

Anonymous's picture

Hi

With every slackware release it takes at least a day to get something near to what I want then another couple of weeks installing other packages that are needed on an intermittent basis but nevertheless need to be installed.

But with this latest release I am finding various niggles. Alsa is recognising three sound devices and lists the wrong one as default - had to create a new file alsa-base to get around this. Ghostscript 8.71 is borked. Therefore downgraded ghostscript to 8.70 from slack 13. Cannot install ati official graphic driver - complains that the kernel numbers do not match - and it could be right. The open source graphics driver works but leaves various artifacts on the screen.

So you can see not only does it take time to install and setup, but takes time getting it the way you want and with the niggles removed.

Having said I stick with slack because its dead easy to install new packages and upgrade packages ala sbopkg and slackbuilds.org therefore keeping the system fairly up-to date for those important packages such as clamav.

lilo a disadvantage?

straydat's picture

there are tons of people who prefer lilo and consider grub a massive pile of crap.

"and it still uses LILO..."

Anonymous's picture

"and it still uses LILO..." He says that like it's a bad thing. Funny!

Me included... LILO is my

Anakin's picture

Me included... LILO is my kind of bootloader...I'm glad it's still present in Slack :)

Pure experience?

corfy's picture

I would have thought a "pure Linux experience" would be something more along the lines of "Linux from Scratch".

----
Laugh at life or life will laugh at you.

I strongly agree.

razixx's picture

I strongly agree.

Easy-to-use? Arguable...

aheinrich's picture

"Slackware is just as up-to-date and easy-to-use as any Linux distribution."

Don't get me wrong, I love slack, especially as a server OS. Pat has done an amazing job over the years. But I'd argue that its no where close to Ubuntu in terms of ease-of-use. Slackware takes far more investment, actively learning about each of the basic components, whereas other distros have really enhanced and perfected the "automagical" configs/setups/user experiences. Once you've taken your lumps and learned the ins-and-outs, Slack usability increases dramatically. But "easy-to-use" is not a definition that I'd attribute to Slack.

That said, I don't want it to be easy - When people ask me "How do I learn Linux", I give them the same answer that was given to me years ago: If you want to see immediate results, use Debian or Ubuntu. If you want to REALLY learn the nuts and bolts, use Slack.

Slackware 13.1

joe f.'s picture

Exactly. I keep trying to tell people that the advances in things like the kernel and KDE have affected Slackware more than some other distros. Now Slackware does the automagical things those distros did or do with scripts and programs and so on, but does them without messing with the vanilla packages. KDE on Slackware is as easy as anything out there once it's installed. This update picked up my bluetooth mouse, my USB audio DAC and so on. Slackpkg is very nice to use, sbopkg (to use slackbuilds) is easy, too. I think any user could get by on what comes on the DVD, but it seems we all have a couple of programs we can't get by without (rox-filer is always the first post-install addition for me), and between slackbuilds and slacky.eu, I can get whatever I want.

And frankly, Patrick Volkerding's low-key approach is a breath of fresh air.

Just what is true linux???

jaymama's picture

Dude your disadvantages alone outweighs the advantages alone?!? Am I missing something. Just what is true linux really. Useless worst of time writing and reading this article.

Wow, touchy.

Anonymous's picture

Wow, some people are oh so touchy when it comes to Slackware. Not surprising, really..but..wow.

Coming from the perspective of someone who knows what they're doing, but has increasingly become lazy, I can understand and accept this article. Perhaps in your opinion the installer is easy (actually, for me it is too), and perhaps you're fine with most *or* all aspects of Slackware, but that is indeed your opinion. Perhaps you aren't the intended target audience in which this article was written for? Hm?

With that said..I'm familiar with Slackware, it was my only distro for quite some time -- but these days I prefer the automatic/eye candy goodness of distros such as openSUSE and Kubuntu. After reading this article..I can understand the points made. In truth, Slackware is a great distro..but for someone like myself, editing files, using an ugly installer (my opinion!), messing with fdisk, etc is all a bit off-putting. At least, when I'm in a lazy *do it for me* type of mood.

Oh..and @ jaymama, when did the writer say the disadvantages outweighed the advantages? I don't see that. Well..thanks for your "useless worst of time writing and reading" comment, I guess.

Wow, touchy.

Anonymous's picture

Wow, some people are oh so touchy when it comes to Slackware. Not surprising, really..but..wow.

Coming from the perspective of someone who knows what they're doing, but has increasingly become lazy, I can understand and accept this article. Perhaps in your opinion the installer is easy (actually, for me it is too), and perhaps you're fine with most *or* all aspects of Slackware, but that is indeed your opinion. Perhaps you aren't the intended target audience in which this article was written for? Hm?

With that said..I'm familiar with Slackware, it was my only distro for quite some time -- but these days I prefer the automatic/eye candy goodness of distros such as openSUSE and Kubuntu. After reading this article..I can understand the points made. In truth, Slackware is a great distro..but for someone like myself, editing files, using an ugly installer (my opinion!), messing with fdisk, etc is all a bit off-putting. At least, when I'm in a lazy *do it for me* type of mood.

Oh..and @ jaymama, when did the writer say the disadvantages outweighed the advantages? I don't see that. Well..thanks for your "useless worst of time writing and reading" comment, I guess.

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Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

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Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

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Sponsored by ActiveState