Speed Test for Nerds

Most people with Internet access in their houses have visited a speed-test Web site to make sure they're getting somewhere close to the speed they're overpaying for. I'm paying more than $100 a month for my business-class connection from Charter, so on a regular basis, I make sure I'm getting the advertised speed. (I seldom get the advertised speed, but the margin of error is acceptable. I guess.)

One of the frustrations with Internet speed tests is that most of them require Adobe Flash to work. Even those sites that don't require Flash do require a rather robust (and frivolous) GUI that I find annoying at best. If you're anything like me, you'd like a simple command-line tool that gives you your speed. If you're truly like me, that last sentence just sparked notions of automated scripts e-mailing results via timed cron jobs at different times during the day. Welcome to the club; we're all nerds here.

Thankfully, my friend Charlie K. (I won't use his last name, because I didn't ask him if I could) posted a link on Google Plus to the speedtest-cli program. The project is on GitHub at https://github.com/sivel/speedtest-cli, and to get the Python-based program, simply do this:


# wget -O speedtest-cli \ 
  https://raw.github.com/sivel/speedtest-cli/master/speedtest_cli.py
# chmod +x speedtest-cli

Then execute the script ./speedtest-cli to get your results. There are advanced options as well, but a simple execution of the script will provide your speed results. You can see the results of my supposed 80/5 business connection in the screenshot.

______________________

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

White Paper
Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

Learn More

Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

Learn More

Sponsored by ActiveState