Putting the Wholes Together

If incoming mail contains the word "identity" it goes to a mailbox I started in late 2004. It has over 7000 emails in it now. The majority of those are from the Identity Gang list.

The Identity Gang got its name when it first met informally on the December 31, 2004 edition of Gillmor Gang. I've lost track of how many workshops and meetings and other exercizes in convergence we've had, but the progress continues to be amazing.

I just looked at what Eric Norlin of IDG wrote here, then at what Scott Kveton of JanRain wrote here then at what Kim Cameron of Microsoft wrote here — to pick just three out of countless posts, all connected somehow. You can see the progress in just one month.

This observation comes in the midst of thinking about a form of
Vendor Relationship Management
that has the same initials as CRM, but a different meaning: Creator Relationship Management.

I would like to relate to creators in a better, less intermediated way. On the supply side, Creative Commons has done a great job of clarifying how artists and their representatives would like to relate in the marketplace. Think of CC as a form of CRM — of customer relationship management. A way of relating to customers. It's a great start. But it still only comes from the supply side.

Now I want to come back at creators from the other direction: from the demand side. From my end, not just theirs. I want to give them something more to relate to than an entry I put in a form on a website. I want to create a mechanism of engagement that is independent of any one supplier: that is silo-free.

I want them to be in my database, not just be one entry in their database.

I want to relate as a customer in the marketplace, and to be able to expand on that relationship in ways that allow both sides to create and expand value.

That means if I like a play, or a piece of music, or a podcast, or a video, or any creative production, and I want to pay the creators (and the producers) for that, I want a way to do that directly, on my own terms, with minimum intermediation.

I want to reward the intermediators too — the producers and distributors, for example. Anybody who contributes value.

Beyond cash for goods or services, I would like the option of having some range in relating. Maybe I want nothing more than give an artist some cash and a high-five. Or I may want a subscription to notices of new work, or to performances near where I live.

The thing is, this mechanism needs to live on my side: to be mine. It must be able to relate to a first source or to an intermediary, but it can't belong to the intermediary. The responsibilities for relating need to be shared. To do that, I need to control my end, free and clear. I can't just be enrolled in a system controlled by the supply side, or by somebody in the middle.

The absence of the power to relate from the demand side — except with cash or mechanisms controled by the supply side or its intermediaries — is a problem as old as the Industrial Age, and it's time to solve it.

So: my role on the demand side needs to be better equipped. How do we do that?

First we start with identity. That's why everything going on in the Identity Space is important. (And why I need to catch up with it.)

Second, we need to pick a problem to solve, not an ocean to boil. Here's one I like: make it easier for public broadcasting listeners and viewers to pay for the goods they receive. Right now public broadcasting continues to raise money in extremely old-fashioned ways. The one I hate most is the fund drive where they turn off programming for two weeks, plead poverty, and then give you a cup or a CD if you send some money. There has to be a better way.

So that's what I want to work on as my first VRM project, which I'll vistit in Wednesday's SuitWatch Newsletter, and then detail here on Thursday. Stay tuned.

______________________

Doc Searls is Senior Editor of Linux Journal

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agree

videoklipler's picture

ı agree you must know yourself

like man

Full Oyun Oyna's picture

hello that right man that is right ı agree have a nice day by uçak oyunları

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hi man ı dont thınk so your ideas have a nice day by trt1 sınıf 2010 dizisi full izle

hello man that's right ı agree 3d araba oyunları

hello man that's right ı agree by gönülden sevenler

very good

araba oyunları's picture

this topic very nice.thank you admin.

So that's what I want to

Anonymous's picture

So that's what I want to work on as my first VRM project, which I'll vistit in Wednesday's SuitWatch Newsletter, and then detail here on Thursday. Stay tuned. i am examining that vrm project looks very successf

Doc expresses the hope that

devesh's picture

Doc expresses the hope that a generalized open framework will make it possible for participants who have traditionally been left out of defining the terms of transactions to have more of a say.

Things like the iStore make

lightbulb's picture

Things like the iStore make things much easier but beyond that I'm not sure what we can do.

How can the artists and their production companies will benefit?

Anonymous's picture

Downloading makes file sharing much easy. But this has also a downside, as artists and production companies are not being rightfully paid for their works. Is there any computer programs that can limit indiscriminate downloading?

Will there be some solution for this?

Anonymous's picture

How can the creators of art productions can be rightfully paid? I was thinking that something must be done as this might imposes bigger problems in the future.

reply

Full Oyun Oyna's picture

hello that right man that is right ı agree have a nice day by uçak oyunları

hi my brothers real love is not sretresing it is so good man ıf you live like a real man by dailymotion videoları

hi man ı dont thınk so your ideas have a nice day by trt1 sınıf 2010 dizisi full izle

hello man that's right ı agree 3d araba oyunları

hello man that's right ı agree by gönülden sevenler

Will it be possible to solve this problem?

Anonymous's picture

It's hard to come up with a rigid solution for this downloading problem. How can we protect the rights of music and video creators, without jeopardizing the customers' demand?

The negative ramification

Anonymous's picture

Yes, you may be having a free music downloads, never mind those great minds behind these creations. But put it in mind, what if artists can no longer keep up with the infringement activies and decided to stop producing songs? Come to think of it.

It's up for the lawmakers to come up with something.

Anonymous's picture

It's nature for consumers to choose music and video products that are free, even though they know that the creators of these are not receiving even a single cent for their hard labor. This is quite understandable as this is a human-nature! So it's up for the lawmakers to do something about this infringement activities.

How can we solve this looming problem?

Anonymous's picture

I am not an economist or a pundit in the supply and demand relation. But I think that this problem would be harder to solve. As consumers, if they can, will not pay for the product if they can have it for free.

This is the downside of technology

Cora's picture

Because of the internet, anyone can pretty much share whatever they want to. Music, videos, or any creative production have now an easy access. This is where copyright infringement may happen.

Interesting Points of View

Anonymous's picture

Interesting ideas; it's always difficult to make the connection between concept and finished product. Very good read.

VRM is an issue that hits

David Phentramin's picture

VRM is an issue that hits home with me as a studio musician. I'd like to see your project develop into something that can really help artists get more of what they deserve without some guys in suits taking 90% of the money. Thanks!

totally agree

koozie's picture

I totally agree with that, I could see them split 50/50 but they just rip off the artist

Grants

Muse's picture

Having written several grants, I do have to agree that there is more to it than that, but he's pretty much got the gist of it. We don't get paid unless we get the grant, the grant funds the business, even radio stations, and that's the end of it.

Wrong

Blackhawk's picture

There are actually several other ways to gain funding. One good example is a grant. Hire a grant writer. They don't get paid unless they actually successfully get the grant!

Funding

BigRockStar's picture

Unfortunately, what other ways are there for them to get the funding for the programs? It's not like they have a choice.

>> First we start with

Game Cheats's picture

>> First we start with identity

I agree, everything has to start from there.

Better Way

ImLearningAl's picture

I agree that there has to be a better way, but the bureaucratic system won't let it happen :(

lol!

brandy's picture

'Second, we need to pick a problem to solve, not an ocean to boil. Here's one I like: make it easier for public broadcasting listeners and viewers to pay for the goods they receive. Right now public broadcasting continues to raise money in extremely old-fashioned ways. The one I hate most is the fund drive where they turn off programming for two weeks, plead poverty, and then give you a cup or a CD if you send some money. There has to be a better way.'
you go doc and we'll follow. don't want to boil in an ocean of despair (like nicholas and glynn-sorry guys, its so you to 'boil'). Doc's got a point...and a game plan we hope?!

What a load of crap

Anonymous's picture

Just another example of someone trying to create another way to squeeze in as a non-value-added middleman. Bringing buyers and sellers together is last millenium. We should be thinking about how to get out the way, not noodle in and try to get a piece of the action.

Despite your fine lip-service about disintermediation and value-add, this is so transparently the opposite, it's physically disgusting.

vrm project

Anonymous's picture

So that's what I want to work on as my first VRM project, which I'll vistit in Wednesday's SuitWatch Newsletter, and then detail here on Thursday. Stay tuned. i am examining that vrm project looks very successful.

This is about much more than ecommerce

ErikB's picture

I arrived via this page, which I found while searching for the percentage of Americans who donate to public radio, so I haven't exactly been, uh, keeping up on VRM as such, but Doc Searls is talking about a lot more than commercial relations. He's talking about a general framework for defining the parameters of transactions based on the identity of the participants. The transactions might vary from "I read articles on your blog and I post responses" to "if my photo and private messages make you curious to meet me, we might arrange a real-life date" to "I pay you one dollar for this sound file". In fact, any time you interact with someone or something on the Internet, you are engaging in a transaction that has parameters that have been defined. Only, chances are, not by you. At this juncture in history, most often the diffuse mass of the "users", as they are thought of, doesn't get to define the parameters of the transactions. Doc expresses the hope that a generalized open framework will make it possible for participants who have traditionally been left out of defining the terms of transactions to have more of a say. Part of what makes VRM so exciting is that computers make it possible to define complex parameters very precisely in quite a few dimensions--some of which we've barely begun to explore--often with enforcement at no extra cost if the system is designed reasonably well.

As a tangential example: XML/HTML over Flash. The more open formats allow requesters to employ any user agent they want and to control their own experience, whereas the proprietary one only is accessible through clients controlled by a corporation. The XML/HTML model is more more flexible, more inspiring, and more fun.

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