An open letter to Adobe

Hello, oh great and powerful Adobe people.

Thank you so much for releasing Flash Player 10 beta 2 for Linux. Thanks even more for (finally) building in support for video4linux2 Webcam technology. You have no idea how much we appreciate that. The only problem is that many (if not most) of us can't use it. You see, it crashes our browsers within seconds.

Reading earlier posts on this subject, it's obvious that Adobe is aware of this problem (Flash player 10 beta 2 crashing Firefox) and that they have fixed it in-house. I think I speak for more than just myself when I say, "Please, just let us have the fixed version." You don't know how long we've waited for video4linux2 support. The suspense is killing us. Besides, it's kind of rough to be told that a beta is available with said features, then not have it work. It's even harder when we are told it's fixed by we can't possibly have it. So, please. Please. Let us have the current fixed version. We know it's not the real, final product, but we accept that. It's cool. Really. What do you say? Come on, guys. One little tiny fixed beta? No one is going to complain. In fact, we'll say nothing but nice things about you. Really.

What do you say?

Please. Pretty please . . .

______________________

Marcel (Writer and Free Thinker at Large) Gagné
http://www.marcelgagne.com AND www.cookingwithlinux.com

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Works justtttttt fine in

George P Burdell's picture

Works justtttttt fine in Opera 9.51.

Ever since I left Firefox when 2.x mugged my computer for RAM more than I could stand any longer, I've had all these nice fringe benefit feature benefits.

- Speed Dial
- Integrated good Feed Reader
- Integrated good EMail

And now working Flash 10 Beta 2.

I also thought it was very

jbs's picture

I also thought it was very funny. Yes, it was over the top just enough. Your article intrigued me and I had to try for myself. I downloaded the .tar version and extracted it. The installer didn't work for me but I copied the .so file into my plugins folder of Firefox install and it works fine. Went to a few sites to check it out. I have Shockwave Flash 10.0.0 d525 installed. My Firefox is a nightly, Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:2.0a1pre) Gecko/2008060602 Minefield/4.0a1pre. I use Zenwalk 5.2 distro.

john

Pathetic

Anonymous's picture

What you want to say is good, it's even true. But how you wrote your letter is pathetic. You are almost crying ... Adobe is not God, it's just another company. We, I or you are not their slaves, and begging them looks hilarious.

So, please don't send your letter to them, even if you are right.

PS: By the way, I use Opera 9.52 and I had little problems with FlashPlayer 10 beta 2. Beta 1 was working pretty well too...

re: Pathetic

marcel's picture

It's meant to be funny. I was hoping the letter was so over the top, that I didn't really need to include smileys after every period. Subtlety, it seems, is indeed lost on the Web. [ insert appropriate smiley here ]

--Marcel

Marcel (Writer and Free Thinker at Large) Gagné
http://www.marcelgagne.com AND www.cookingwithlinux.com

Pie in the face

António Manuel Dias's picture

Maybe it's the pie in the face generation. They don't understand any other kind of humor.

Using V4L2 camera diagnostic?

John Dowdell's picture

Hi, in your post I didn't see mention of Mike Melanson's recent request for assistance in Linux webcam testing... have you seen this yet, and does it help?
http://blogs.adobe.com/penguin.swf/2008/07/paparazzi_v2_1.html

jd/adobe

re: Using V4L2 camera diagnostic

marcel's picture

Hello John,

Thanks for replying. I did, in fact, reply with my own diagnostics. You'll see my name there in the list (Marcel Gagne) of people submitting their camera diagnostics. And no, it did not help -- at least I can't see how it would. I appreciate the work that's involved, but my 'beef' with this (so to speak) is that the second beta released crashes a huge number of systems (which I understand is a processor issue and a bug that crept in between beta 1 and beta 2) and that you (Adobe) already have a fix that would resolve these crashes. All of this is in the Adobe forums. I obviously want support for the majority of V4L2 cameras (mine included) but I'd like to be able to use what's there in Beta 2 with relative stability.

-- Marcel

Marcel (Writer and Free Thinker at Large) Gagné
http://www.marcelgagne.com AND www.cookingwithlinux.com

Okay, so you did see Mike's

John Dowdell's picture

Okay, so you did see Mike's request for helping testing different Linux webcam implementations. I hadn't seen the link to source info in the original post, that's why I asked.

So it sounds like you're asking for nightly builds, or something more frequent than Adobe's current preview system... is that the core request?

jd/adobe

re; Nightly builds

marcel's picture

As you put it, "So it sounds like you're asking for nightly builds, or something more frequent than Adobe's current preview system... is that the core request?"

Yes, that would be a great start. In the case of the release 10, beta 2 product, those nightly builds would have fixed the annoying crash on a great number of systems while providing users with the functionality offered by that release. Besides, the concept of nightly (or frequent) releases works exceedingly well in the open source world (and yes, I know Flash player is not open source). By releasing often, you provide a mechanism whereby your developers can benefit with regular feedback from the very people they, and Adobe, are trying to reach. It also creates an environment where your users are actually seeing changes in the product that responds to their needs and problems rather than the excruciatingly annoying "Honest, we are working on it, and someday, we promise to release something that you'll really, really like. Usually, after that statement, users wait, and wait, and . . . well, you get the idea.

As much as we, Linux users and the open source community would love to see Adobe open up Flash, Adobe could still reap a great deal of good karma by just involving us, even if that means showing us what you are working on in a timely fashion and quickly fixing bugs that crash your core software (in this case, browsers like Firefox). You'll actually be creating a product users want and need, and you'll get great feedback.

-- Marcel

Marcel (Writer and Free Thinker at Large) Gagné
http://www.marcelgagne.com AND www.cookingwithlinux.com

I thought it was funny

Carlie Fairchild's picture

:)

Carlie Fairchild is the publisher of Linux Journal.

CRAP

Shawn Powers's picture

It was humor?

Now I have to tear down my Adobe idol.

[Hmmm... what company to worship now...]

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

Me too.

Anonymous's picture

:-)

(Oh, boy... Don't some people still have 4.7MHz 8080 processors for a brain?)

White Paper
Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

Learn More

Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

Learn More

Sponsored by ActiveState