Gutsy's Good on a Laptop

Here is a recent experience installing Kubuntu on a laptop.

Though I love to tinker with the latest cutting-edge distros on my desktop machines, I have been more conservative with my laptop, the machine I use for work. This is a sweet little R Cubed (i.e. a Linux-based Acer) laptop running SUSE 10.1, and I had everything set up and tuned like I want it.

I was getting a little tired of seeing my desktop spring forward by leaps and bounds and feeling like my laptop was stuck in the dark ages. To be honest, what was holding me back was an irrational fear that installing a new distro mean losing functionality, such as my Fn keys, and/or causing much configuration pain. Also, with my desktops, I have the luxury of leaving them alone if there is a problem to solve. My work machine needs to work flawlessly right now - simple as that. In the face of my fears, finally this week I decided to take the plunge and upgrade.

I decided that the choice would be between openSUSE 10.3 and Kubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). Before diving in, I downloaded the CD images of the Live versions of both distributions and gave them a quick test. The Live versions are what sold me. Both versions both worked flawlessly and kept all of the functionality of the machine. Each desktop has an icon that invites you to do a full install. Tempting...tempting...should I do it! Click! The process was started.

At first I was tempted to choose openSUSE 10.3 since the desktop is much more attractive, its version of OpenOffice.org has extra functionality, and I've had generally positive experiences with SUSE over the years. However, I have also fallen in love with (K)ubuntu's package management capabilities, so I opted for Kubuntu 7.10.

The installation went as smoothly as I could expect. I went with the manual partitioning option so I could make sure I wasn't overwriting anything I wanted to keep, such as my Windows XP NTFS partition. I simply had to mount the existing Linux partition as root and authorize its formatting as a ReiserFS file system. I set it to work before jogging, and when I came back I was ready to roll with my new Gutsy-based laptop.

Today I pulled in all of my files backed up on a USB hard drive, and besides customizing my desktop, thus far things have gone well. Kubuntu Gutsy works flawlessly on my laptop. I have installed buckets of applications using the Adept Package Manager. I love it! My fears of Linux on laptops has been purged! Way to go, Kunbuntu Gutsy!

______________________

James Gray is Products Editor for Linux Journal

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Procrastination, I Has It.

Shawn Powers's picture

I still haven't tried Kubuntu, on any computer. Maybe today will be the day. :)

I did try it on my MacBook Pro, but the wireless network app seemed to struggle with my card. (You have to do some funny monkey-business to get the MBP card to work anyway) I have a desktop running Ubuntu, maybe it's time to give Kubuntu a roll. I do enjoy installing Linux after all...

Thanks James!

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

Webinar
One Click, Universal Protection: Implementing Centralized Security Policies on Linux Systems

As Linux continues to play an ever increasing role in corporate data centers and institutions, ensuring the integrity and protection of these systems must be a priority. With 60% of the world's websites and an increasing share of organization's mission-critical workloads running on Linux, failing to stop malware and other advanced threats on Linux can increasingly impact an organization's reputation and bottom line.

Learn More

Sponsored by Bit9

Webinar
Linux Backup and Recovery Webinar

Most companies incorporate backup procedures for critical data, which can be restored quickly if a loss occurs. However, fewer companies are prepared for catastrophic system failures, in which they lose all data, the entire operating system, applications, settings, patches and more, reducing their system(s) to “bare metal.” After all, before data can be restored to a system, there must be a system to restore it to.

In this one hour webinar, learn how to enhance your existing backup strategies for better disaster recovery preparedness using Storix System Backup Administrator (SBAdmin), a highly flexible bare-metal recovery solution for UNIX and Linux systems.

Learn More

Sponsored by Storix