Don't Miss the Boat

If you're in the mood for Linux — and who amongst us isn't — September may be your month, as the Linux Foundation presents the inaugural LinuxCon in Portland. Just shy of two months ago we sounded the call to rise, shine, and catch the early bird rate — sadly, the early bird's worm is no more. It's still possible, though, to grab yourself a spot and shave a nice slice off the price.

LinuxCon is shaping up to be a formidable contender amongst Linux conferences, sporting a lineup that reads like a Who's Who of the Open Source world. Speakers will include the chief penguin himself, Linus Torvalds, as well as Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu's Self-Appointed Benevolent Dictator for Life, IBM Open Source/Linux VP Bob Sutor, and the infamously-less-bearded Bdale Garbee of Hewlett-Packard, among others. Sessions are scheduled on Mobile Linux, virtualization, kernel development, networking, and various applications, as well as emerging topics including Linux and Open Source in enterprise, community management, cloud computing, Open Source compliance and licensing, open standards, and the role of Linux in the current economy.

Attendees will also have the opportunity to meet the "Linux Luminaries" in attendance, as well as networking with other influential Linux users. The program apparently even includes a charity bowling contest "that will help you save the penguins while challenging your favorite Linux developers." Full information about the event is available from the conference website. Time is slipping away, however, as registration for LinuxCon 2009 closes on August 15, just over two weeks from now — interested parties are encouraged to sign up as soon as possible. The current rate is $399, though it will rise to a late-registration rate of $499 after August 15.

For those who missed the boat on the early bird discount of $299, fear not, for other discounts are still around. Students who attend college/university at least part-time can still register for the conference at a special $199 student rate, while Linux Foundation members receive 30% off. Parties of three or more from the same company receive 15% off as well. The latest discount to appear, however, is available to everyone: Members of Linux.com, which is available to everyone, receive 20% off — that's $319, just $20 more than the original early-bird rate.

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Justin Ryan is a Contributing Editor for Linux Journal.

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tekne

tekne's picture

Thank you for articles

Price is cheap....

JimmyTheGeek's picture

...compared to most other IT conferences! I'll be there, and I'm coming from a small town in Southern KY! My work is paying for it since I set it in the budget as professional development. This conference, with early bird registration, round-trip airfare, cab fare, food and hotel, < $1,000. Try and find one of the other major cons for that price!

I consider myself an average "Joe Linux" fan as my server admin skills are virtually nil past some basic mysql and networking stuff, but I do use it at work for all my research, web development and office collaborations on my desktop. I also use it at home, only I have to dual-boot so I can play Medal of Honor.

My goal with Linux is to become LPI-certified. My plans at work, with the full backing of my boss, are to convert the entire backroom to Linux. Granted we only have one server that runs on Windows, but I have already started the transformation with a storage server running on FreeNAS (BSD-based, but it IS open-source and not Windows!)

Maybe $1,000 is a steep price for a week-long conference, and that alone will be a barrier for some folks. But this is my first "professional" conference, and I have planned my budget to be able to attend.

High Barrier To Entry

Anonymous's picture

Ouch, does that attendance price include a hotel room, or something? How does an average joe Linux fan afford this?

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