Adobe is Back to Flash Us Again – With 64-bit

Just a month after the release of Adobe's Flash Player 10 — with, for the first time, full Linux support out of the box — Adobe is back with another surprise: a 64-bit Flash Player — exclusively for Linux.

The lack of native Flash support for 64-bit Linux has been a perpetual thorn-in-the-side of 64-bit distributions. While there are workarounds to the problem, the lack of a Flash Player for 64-bit systems has made utilizing the full potential of 64-bit systems difficult. Coupled with the rather notorious state of Linux support in general, the problems for 64-bit users have been legion.

Adobe has apparently heard the outcry — how could they not? — and they've answered quickly and clearly. First was the release of Flash Player 10 with full Linux support — something which Linux users waited months for under the previous release. Now comes an alpha version — a "prelease" — of Flash Player 10 for 64-bit systems. It's not just for 64-bit systems, though — it's for 64-bit Linux systems. That's right: the release only offers support for Linux/Solaris. No Windows. No Mac. Just us.

According to Adobe, 64-bit Linux users won the lottery on this one because they were the most vocal in calling for a 64-bit player. They also apparently took into consideration 64-bit distributions shipping without a 32-bit browser or 32-bit emulation. We're sure it didn't hurt that Linux users are the intrepid sort, and will provide Adobe with a tidal wave of feedback on every aspect of the player's performance. Windows and Mac offerings are scheduled for "future prereleases."

The full gory details, including system requirements, installation instructions, and known issues — there is always something, isn't there? — can be found in the Linux 64-bit Alpha Release Notes. Those too excited to wait can jump straight to the download page.

______________________

Justin Ryan is a Contributing Editor for Linux Journal.

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

will it ever be ADOBE CS.. FOR Linux OS?

kwame's picture

Am just wondering when we are going to have adobe cs+ for Linux os? Now that there's a plan by adobe for 64bit version and Linux OS happen to be a leader!

What we *really* need are the file format specs without NDA

Sum Yung Gai's picture

OK, fine, this could prove handy for some situations. However, if Adobe really does care about Linux users' being able to play Flash videos easily, then Adobe should take the same step it did with PDF--publish the file format specs without NDA. Yes, Adobe would make a bundle by doing so.

Don't believe me? Look at all the PDF viewers, both FOSS and proprietary, for GNU/Linux, BSD, Mac OS, MS Windows, hell, even OS/2. Even OpenOffice.org can make PDF's! PDF is everywhere. That's why Adobe sells so many copies of Acrobat--BECAUSE PDF is open and thus everywhere. There's no reason to believe the same thing wouldn't happen w/ Flash/Shockwave.

And it would be an effective counter to Microsoft's proprietary, patent-encumbered trap they call Silverlight.

So let's go, Adobe. Truly open the specs.

--SYG

Thank You

Anonymous's picture

I replace the flashplugin-nonfree and nspluginwraper with the alpha.
It's working better than before.

Thank You for the news.

Wow!

crashsystems's picture

What is next, Adobe releasing the source for Flash? Perhaps not, but that they released 64bit support for Linux _first_ seems almost as amazing!

White Paper
Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

Learn More

Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

Learn More

Sponsored by ActiveState