Kernel Korner - Linux as an Ethernet Bridge

It passes packets like a bridge and filters like a firewall. Put extra security and versatility in front of any server or device, without reconfiguring it.

Have you ever been asked to secure a router over which you did not have administrative control? What about when you are on a network you don't own but want to secure the segment are you using? A request similar to this one is what brought me to the wonderful world of Bridge, the Linux Ethernet bridging project.

According to the Bridge Web site:

Ethernet bridging is a way to connect networks together to form a larger network. The standard for bridging is ANSI/IEEE 802.1d. A bridge is a way to connect two separate network segments together in a protocol-independent way. Packets are forwarded based on Ethernet address, rather than IP address (like a router). Since forwarding is done at Layer 2, all protocols can go transparently through a bridge.

The code currently is maintained by Stephen Hemminger for both the Linux 2.4 and 2.6 kernels. Most modern distributions using the 2.6 series kernel have the bridging code built in. For the purposes of this article, we are using Fedora Core 3, which is built on the 2.6 kernel. If you're stuck with the 2.4 kernel, don't despair. Kernel patches are available on the Bridge site (see the on-line Resources), so you can play too.

The firewall component of the bridging firewall is achieved by using another related project called ebtables. The ebtables program is a filtering layer for a bridging firewall. The filtering connects into the Link Layer Ethernet frame field. In addition to filtering, you also may manipulate the Ethernet MAC addresses. The ebtables code also allows iptables rules to function in bridging mode, giving you both IP- and MAC-level filters for your firewall.

What Is a Bridge?

A bridge is a device that links two or more network segments that use the same network technologies. The topologies may differ, though, so you can go from fiber to copper, but the technologies must remain the same. In its most simple form, think of a Linux hub. Add as many ports to the box as you want, and they all become part of the single hub device. What comes in one port goes out all of the other ports in the hub fabric, unless you state otherwise in the rules. Once your hub is up, you can use iptables and ebtables to filter traffic as you would any other Linux forwarding system.

Getting Started

We start out simply by attempting to achieve connectivity between a simple two-NIC machine. When we are finished, this Linux box should act as a standard hub, passing traffic from one port to another as needed. When we plug one NIC in to our regular network jack and a laptop into the second NIC, we will be able to use the network from the laptop as if we were connected directly.

Figure 1. In this simple network, the Linux system acts like an Ethernet hub, passing all traffic.

We want this bridge to be transparent to any device plugged in to it. Interestingly enough, beyond the ability to connect remotely to the bridge to maintain it and check logs, there is no requirement to give the bridge an IP address. Of course, in today's connected world it makes sense to assign an IP address and we do so here.

I started with an old box that has been waiting for a project such as this. It's an AMD K6-450 with 256MB of RAM. It has a single 15GB IDE hard drive and a single 3Com 10/100MB Ethernet card. I also had a spare 3Com 10/100MB Ethernet card that works well with Linux, so it is added as the second interface. I am going to run only the bridge software, some simple firewall rules and perhaps Snort for intrusion detection. The traffic volumes are low and I don't expect massive amounts of Snort data, so 256MB of RAM should suffice. If you're going to be passing gigabit traffic and want to sniff live, ramp up the specs of the machine considerably.

Now install Fedora Core 3, selecting the extras you feel are needed. If you work in high-security environments, I recommend keeping your software options to the bare minimum. You always can grab extras later with YUM if you forget something. For now, simply get a working Linux install going and make sure that it finds your network cards. You need the kernel source and usual compile utilities to make the ebtables code, so add those in. Remember to stay secure and remove any software you don't need once you place the device into production. Once the install completes, reboot and log in as root.

Now you are ready to create a virtual network device. You can call it whatever you want; I went with br0—the first bridge device:

#> brctl addbr br0

Run ifconfig. Do you see your network interfaces (Listing 1)?

______________________

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Note to readers: The author

Kevin Borders's picture

Note to readers: The author says many times that brctl causes your machine to act like a HUB. This is incorrect, brctl will make your machine behave like a SWITCH. If a particular MAC address has sent some packets on one of the bridge ports, brctl will only forward packets destined for that MAC address to that one port, not all ports.

Bridge as router

Beginer 's picture

How to configure Bridge as Router?
I have box, which acts as bridge und AP. Internet => Bridge,AP => Laptop WiFi. I have to change MAC Address on Laptop-WiFi (that know my Internet Provider). Bridge is transparent. I want set up MAC Addres on Bridge interface from Internet porvider and to connect to WiFi net with whatever MAC Address.

White Paper
Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

Learn More

Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

Learn More

Sponsored by ActiveState