Kino Tips: Installing from Scratch and Exporting MPEG Videos

If you're ready to give video editing and movie making a try now that you know about Kino, here are some tips to get you up and running.
Tip: Exporting a Movie

Although a digital camcorder can be used to show the exported movie on a TV screen, we do not recommend wasting the limited camcorder resources. Keep the full-quality version of the movie on a DV tape so you can work with it later.

Because the human eye barely can detect the difference between an MPEG 2 compressed movie and the original DV format when shown on a TV screen, making a DVD for general viewing is more useful.

The structure of a DVD is not simple. In general, it is possible to make a DVD that contains a movie, additional photos and so on, but this is a topic for another article. With Kino, you can build a simple DVD structure to use with a standalone DVD player.

Begin at the Export tab. Select DV Pipe and than choose the tool FFMPEG DVD-Video Export. In Profile, select Output Standard DVD-Video directory (All only); in cases of widescreen sources, use widescreen output. Next, type the output file name without any file extension. This name becomes the top name on the DVD directory tree. Press Export.

Exporting may take hours. We like to start the process before going to bed. When exporting is complete, you have the resulting DVD directory tree (VIDEO_TS and AUDIO_TS), named according to your input. You then can check the results with mplayer or xine.

Before burning the final DVD, you should make the image. We prefer to use the following command, assuming the name movie_dvd :


 mkisofs -dvd-video -o movie dvd.iso movie dvd

You have to burn this image; we usually use growisofs for this task:


growisofs -dvd-compat -Z /dev/dvd=movie dvd.iso

The option -dvd-compat is used to provide maximum media compatibility.

You then can design your own image for the DVD label, print it out and put this new DVD into a real DVD box.

Tip: Making MPEG 4s from the DV File

If you have the movie saved as a .dv file, you easily can turn it into an MPEG 4 video and burn it to a CD. Because not all of our friends are Linux users yet, we prefer to export to an .avi MPEG 4 file.

To increase the quality of the video, we suggest using a two-step encoding process. For the first pass, use:


ffmpeg -i foo.dv -f dv -pass 1 -passlogfile foo -vcodec mpeg4 -g 
250 -qscale 2 -bf 2 -acodec mp3 foo.avi

For the second pass, use:


ffmpeg -f dv -i foo.dv -s 640x480 -4mv -part -strict strictness -pass 2  
-passlogfile foo -vcodec mpeg4 -g 250 -hq -bf 2 -b 1500  -acodec mp3 -ab 128
foo.avi

The input file, the output file and the log file in both of these steps must be the same. Also, you have to specify your desired bit-rate during the second pass. The larger the bit-rate you set, the better quality movie you will have. We cannot suggest a value, however; it usually is based on the size of the requested file. You can repeat the encoding a few times, though. Start with a high bit-rate, and if you are not satisfied with the size, decrease the rate and repeat. Do not forget check the quality as you go.

Processing the file takes some time. Depending on the size of the movie, it can take more than five hours for one step. In the example above, we used PAL sources. If you have NTCS instead of PAL, use -g 300 rather than -g 250. Play with the options and have fun!

Olexiy Tykhomyrov (tiger@ff.dsu.dp.ua) has been using Linux since 1994. He works for the Department of Experimental Physics at Dnepropetrovsk National University and teaches physics and communications. He loves his son Misha, who calls him Tiger because some of his students are afraid him. Tiger likes swimming and traveling.

Denis Tonkonog, a former student of Tiger, also works at Dnepropetrovsk National University and likes traveling and fishing with a gun. Friends call him Black Cat but nobody explains why. He can be reached by e-mail at denis@ff.dsu.dp.ua.

______________________

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I can't install timfx

joao's picture

Hi,

I tried everything but timfx doesn't work, I run the .rpm, it says all teh dependencies are satisfied, it installs with no problem. When I go inside Kino and open the FX dropdown the new options from timfx are not there.

any idea?
Joao

converting mpeg/avi to dv

emk's picture

I have a digital camera that also takes short videos in avi format. I'd like to edit these in Kino. Is there any way to convert these to dv? I have converted some to mpeg with ffmpeg. However the documentation does not explain how to convert to dv.

I would imagine that this would be useful for many people.

Help anyone?

emk

First, start A new project

Anonymous's picture

First, start A new project and save it the name you want. Make sure that you have set the tmp directory to a place that has enough memory. Next, click on the "Insert a file befor the current seen" button. Select the file you wish to convert. You should get a dialog box asking you if you'd like to convert the file to a DV file. Click Yes. Wait untill the progress window closes. Now, go to the same place you're origonal file was located. There should be the converted dv file. Things should go smoothly from there.

PS: If something doesn't work, you might want to load Kino in the terminal window. That way, you can see any errors that might happen. I just spent a few hours trying to convert an avi file and then realized that it was creating the file on my SD card. (The dv file was almost tripple the size of the original AVI file and didn't have enough room for it to be created on the card.)

--

But seriously though.. They REALLY need some better documentation on the kino website. I just downloaded this program today and couldn't get it to work for the longest time. I can't believe that it was something so simple. O_O;

First, start A new project

Anonymous's picture

First, start A new project and save it the name you want. Make sure that you have set the tmp directory to a place that has enough memory. Next, click on the "Insert a file befor the current seen" button. Select the file you wish to convert. You should get a dialog box asking you if you'd like to convert the file to a DV file. Click Yes. Wait untill the progress window closes. Now, go to the same place you're origonal file was located. There should be the converted dv file. Things should go smoothly from there.

PS: If something doesn't work, you might want to load Kino in the terminal window. That way, you can see any errors that might happen. I just spent a few hours trying to convert an avi file and then realized that it was creating the file on my SD card. (The dv file was almost tripple the size of the original AVI file and didn't have enough room for it to be created on the card.)

--

But seriously though.. They REALLY need some better documentation on the kino website. I just downloaded this program today and couldn't get it to work for the longest time. I can't believe that it was something so simple. O_O;

I know. The silence is deafe

Anonymous's picture

I know. The silence is deafening - not a single solution anywhere on the internet. The whole entire video topic is a screaming bloody digusting mess - front to back - left to right.
If someone could sort it out that would be very very great.
Right now it totally sucks.

Video is an important missing ingredient

Steve's picture

No kidding. Linux could be a first rate video processing tool. But instead it almost unusable.

Trivial tasks like converting a DVD to MP4 or editing a home movie are almost impossible. Heck, you can't even watch a DVD, how do you expect that to be taken seriously in the real world?

Come on google, IMB, ubuntu, HP, Sun etc etc - this is a problem that needs to be solved. It is very sad to see such a beautiful operating system in such an unusable state because of a few licensing issues.

You can buy a DVD player for a few bucks these days. The manufacturer had to deal with both mpegla and css. How difficult could it be for the might of the OS community to solve they same legal problems on Linux?

Steve

Video is an importand missing ingedient

Steve's picture

No kidding. Linux could be a first rate video processing tool. But instead it almost unusable.

Trivial tasks like converting a DVD to MP4 or editing a home movie are almost impossible. Heck, you can't even watch a DVD, how do you expect that to be taken seriously in the real world?

Come on google, IMB, ubuntu, HP, Sun etc etc - this is a problem that needs to be solved. It is very sad to see such a beautiful operating system in such an unusable state because of a few licensing issues.

You can buy a DVD player for a few bucks these days. The manufacturer had to deal with both mpegla and css. How difficult could it be for the might of the OS community to solve they same legal problems on Linux?

Steve

Can't find dvtitler

Anonymous's picture

Thank for your articles.
I'm on SuSE 9.2. I can't find the latest source or a SuSE9.2 rpm anywhere for dvtitler. I get a 404 on trying to download from http://kino.schirmacher.de/article/view/79/1/11/ . I therefore tried the rpm for SuSE9.1 from
http://www.ictp.trieste.it/~tiger/kino.html
But it does not appear to work because I do not get the dvtitler UI option as shown in figure 8 on page 60 of the LinuxJournal Dec 2004.
How does Kino find plugins? The above rpm installed dvtitler in /usr/lib/kino-gtk2/. On SuSE 9.2 Kino is installed under /opt/gnome/ and has config file ~/.gnome2/kino. I was hoping in the latter to find something like plugin= but no luck.

Replying to my own posting -

Anonymous's picture

Replying to my own posting - here's what I did to add dvtitler to Kino on SuSE9.2. Maybe helpful to someone else - it would have been to me.

First I downloaded dvtitler-0.1.1.tar.gz to my home directory.
Then I built dvtitler for install in directory /opt/dvtitler from a Konsole window as follows

cd
rm -rf dvtitler-0.1.1
tar xvfz dvtitler-0.1.1.tar.gz
cd dvtitler-0.1.1
./configure --prefix=/opt/dvtitler CPPFLAGS=-I/opt/gnome/include
make

The "configure" and "make" errored on my first attempts because of various missing packages. I installed those using YaST and then repeated the above steps.

Lastly I installed dvtitler as follows
su
make install

Kino looks in directory kino-gtk2 in /opt/gnome/lib for plugins. This appears to be the only mechanism. I therefore added a symlink from there to where it actually is as follows
ln -s /opt/dvtitler/lib/kino-gtk2 /opt/gnome/lib/
exit

The dvtitler UI option in Kino is at the bottom of the popup menu that shows when clicking the bar under "Video Filter" under the "FX" tab. I tried it and it works. Nice.

I started on the same for timfx but it requires as lot more packages installed before it will build successfully. I'll defer for now.

plugin directory

Rick's picture

well done , I had a similar problem after successfully compiling dvtitler in not being able to findit! On my own system the following was needed to create the appropriate symbolic link.(SuSE 9.2 x86-64)

ln -s /usr/local/lib/kino-gtk2 /opt/gnome/lib64/

Thanks heaps

Rick

timfx

Anonymous's picture

In the above I said I'd defer timfx for now. I just finished installing it on SuSE9.2. Here's what I did. It's not that much or hard after all.
The biggest trouble is that timfx requires 3 packages that neither SuSE nor anyone else offers readily available for install on SuSE9.2. They are the ones listed at the bottom of
http://www.mathematik.uni-wuerzburg.de/~vaeth/specs/
Thank you very much to the author for that page which I followed.

First download the source packages from
http://ftp.gnome.org/pub/GNOME/sources/gtkmm/2.4/gtkmm-2.4.8.tar.bz2
http://ftp.gnome.org/pub/GNOME/sources/glibmm/2.4/glibmm-2.4.5.tar.bz2
http://ftp.gnome.org/pub/GNOME/sources/libsigc++/2.0/libsigc++-2.0.6.tar...
to
/usr/src/packages/SOURCES/

Then download the associated spec files from the above page
http://www.mathematik.uni-wuerzburg.de/~vaeth/specs/gtkmm2.4.spec
http://www.mathematik.uni-wuerzburg.de/~vaeth/specs/libsigc++2.0.spec
http://www.mathematik.uni-wuerzburg.de/~vaeth/specs/glibmm.spec
to
/usr/src/packages/SPECS/

Then build the src.rpm's
cd /usr/src/packages/SPECS
rpmbuild -bs gtkmm2.4.spec
rpmbuild -bs libsigc++2.0.spec
rpmbuild -bs glibmm.spec

Next build the binary rpm's (i686 fits my CPU. Omit --target=i686 if unsure)
rpmbuild -bb gtkmm2.4.spec --target=i686
rpmbuild -bb libsigc++2.0.spec --target=i686
rpmbuild -bb glibmm.spec --target=i686

Finally install the rpm's
cd /usr/src/packages/RPMS/i686
rpm -Uvh glibmm-2.4.5-0.mv.0.SuSE_9.2.i686.rpm
rpm -Uvh glibmm-devel-2.4.5-0.mv.0.SuSE_9.2.i686.rpm
rpm -Uvh gtkmm2.4-2.4.8-0.mv.0.SuSE_9.2.i686.rpm
rpm -Uvh gtkmm2.4-devel-2.4.8-0.mv.0.SuSE_9.2.i686.rpm
rpm -Uvh libsigc++2.0-2.0.6-0.mv.1.SuSE_9.2.i686.rpm
rpm -Uvh libsigc++2.0-devel-2.0.6-0.mv.1.SuSE_9.2.i686.rpm

Next, build timfx much like dvtitler.
First I downloaded timfx-0.2.2.tar.gz from the link at the bottom of
http://sourceforge.net/projects/kino/
to my home directory.
Then I built it for install in /opt/timfx as follows

cd
rm -rf timfx-0.2.2
tar xvfz timfx-0.2.2.tar.gz
cd timfx-0.2.2
./configure --prefix=/opt/timfx
KINO_INCLUDE=/opt/gnome/include make

As with dvtitler, if the above complains because of other missing packages then
install those packages using YaST and repeat the above starting at "cd".

Lastly, I installed it
su
make install

As with dvtitler, because I chose to install in /opt/timfx rather than /opt/gnome (because of fear of what the install of a new and unknown program may do to my system) then a symlink is necessary from where Kino expects to find plugins to where they actually are
ln -s /opt/timfx/lib/kino-gtk2/libtimfx.so /opt/gnome/lib/kino-gtk2
exit

Alternatively, if I'd used --prefix=/opt/gnome then timfx would have gotten installed where Kino expects to find it leaving no need for a symlink.

Correction: The symlink command I used for dvtitler should have been
ln -s /opt/dvtitler/lib/kino-gtk2/libdvtitler.so /opt/gnome/lib/kino-gtk2

can't download libsigc2.0

monica's picture

COuld you pls help me download libsigc 2.0-0.dll--or?---I keep getting this mssg -that I need libsig--pls help?---my e/mail address id m17j@netzero.net--Thanks!!! Monica

I looked a little closer and

Anonymous's picture

I looked a little closer and found dvtitler here http://sourceforge.net/projects/dvtitler/
and timfx here
http://sourceforge.net/projects/kino/

Out of the Tip: Using Package

TheWeb's picture

Out of the Tip: Using Packages from LJ FTP Site above:

"For SuSE, simply install timfx and dvtitler with rpm; use timfx-0.2.1-2.i586.rpm and dvtitler-0.1.1-1.i586.rpm. For Fedora Core 2, first install the two packages not available in the standard release, as noted in Table 3. After that, install the plugin packages, timfx-0.2.1-2.i386.rpm and dvtitler-0.1.1-1.i386.rpm."

There is no timfx.rpm nor dvdtitler.rpm within the Suse package?
And I can't find those rpm's at the ftp-site (ftp://ftp.ssc.com/pub/lj/). There are only the files according table 1??
Please advize.

Tnx for this nice article.
Might even consider to subscribe!

Regards,

Where you can find these packages

Denys Tonkonog's picture

Please have a look here:

http://www.ictp.trieste.it/~tiger/kino.html

Yours Olexiy TYkhomyrov and Denys Tonkonog

Video card drivers

Anonymous's picture

Make sure you have drivers installed for your video card. Fedora Core 2, for example, was using a generic driver for my video card. The manufacturer's driver was much faster. Check the manufacturer's web site for drivers.

Kino

Anonymous's picture

This is more of a question than a comment. I have a very usable Sony High 8 video camera (non digital) and quite a few reels of tape. Can I use Kino to edit my videos? What type of video card can I use instead of the IEEE1394 (firewire) interface?

Get a cheap (maybe used) miniDV camcorder

Chris A.'s picture

Most the the new miniDV cameras have a "pass through" feature where you can connect an analog signal to the camera and it will "pass it through" ot the IEEE1394 output. In terms of quality I've not seen a better video analog to digital converter than my Sony camera. Expensive?? Well maybe but a used and usable camera can be bought for about $250.00 There is no need to buy a top of the line camera for use on your desk. The quality is the same. Also I've found that miniDV camera make _very_ excelent audio recorder and analog converter. A cheap used camera for use at the computer may actually pay for itself in reduced wear the taer on your expensive shooting camera. Unlike analog cameras, a low end digital camera will perform playback functions _exactly_ as well as the high end camera.

Kino input

Will's picture

You asked about using something else for inputting video other than ieee1394... I've found that once you get it working, it's almost flawless. I've been using the ADS pyro a/v link, which gives you ieee1394 both in and out, and it's been wonderful.

I've used the V4L setup, but it doesn't work as smoothly and effortlessly (once it's up and running, of course) as ieee1394 does. It drops frames, and frequently doesn't sync properly, up to a couple of seconds off, in my experience.

The pyro device has both composite ins and outs on it, so either way will work, and I've seen them for well under a hundred $$. I personally recommend it over the V4L approach.

My 2Cents...

Expensive Solution

Anonymous's picture

If you buy a Sony Digital 8 video camera, it will convert regular 8mm and High 8 tapes to a DV IEEE1394 output stream on the fly.

Use an analog to DV grabber

Mads Bondo Dydensborg's picture

Hi there

Lots of people recommend the analog to DV converter products from Canopus. Check the e.g. mjpeg mailing lists for more info.

Mads

analog video

Anonymous's picture

There are several video capture cards on the market and many are supported by the Video4Linux subsystem.

The process would be analog to AVI (using a codec of your choosing), then AVI to MPEG using Kino (and associated tools).

HTH.

analogue capture

Steve's picture

Remember Google is your friend

Type "Hi8 camcorder capture computer" into google and press "I'm Feeling Lucky"!

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