Visiting The New World Of Linux Sound & Music Software

______________________

Similis sum folio de quo ludunt venti.

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Re: Visiting the New World of Linux Sound & Music Software

dlc's picture

Another great article, but after all, what was I expecting, chopped livah? :)

I've been using Debian since 1.1 was released (actually 1.0 but some CD distributor jumped the gun and distributed a pre-release version as 1.0, so Debian.org decided to bump the release number to avoid any confusion). Kernel installation could be very challenging when you wanted to get a music development platform together. I'm looking forward to evaluating DeMuDi as my primary workstation platform. Hopefully I can build everything from sources to optimize all executables for my box.

One not so major question: what are the accepted pronunciations of all these acronyms?

author reply

Anonymous's picture

Thank you for your comments, I'm glad you enjoyed the article.

AGNULA 1.1.0 is official as of today (Jan 14), you might want to give it a try. Alas, they didn't get the fancier artwork into this release, but I think they've packaged some instructions for the artwork this time. I'll upgrade after the weekend (got a gig to prep for over the next few days).

Okay, about those acronyms:

Planet CCRMA - planet karma
AGNULA - agnoola (hard 'g')
ALSA, JACK, LADSPA, DeMuDi - just like they look...

I hope that helps... ;)

== dp

Author's response to a fair criticism

Anonymous's picture

I recently received a message from a reader who was dismayed that I did not provide totally complete instructions for installing these systems. He's right, my articles do not intend to substitute for the docs and instructions available from the home sites, but I should have made that fact more clear. My articles are not complete HOWTOs, they are written to serve as a user's impressions of the software under review. I'll be more emphatic about that in future articles, and I apologize to any readers who wasted time trying to install Planet CCRMA or AGNULA using only this article as a guide.

Btw, the specific criticism referred to my failure to mention the need to acquire and install (in /etc/apt) the sources.list from AGNULA or the Planet. Please read all instructions available from the Web sites for these projects *before* attempting their installation.

Best,

== dp

Author's comment: ALSA next month

Anonymous's picture

Btw, I forgot to mention that next month I'll be profiling the latest development of the ALSA project. ALSA has reached 1.0.1 and is now the default sound system for Linux (it's already included with the 2.6.x kernels).

See you next month !

== dp

Re: Visiting the New World of Linux Sound & Music Software

Anonymous's picture

Is Andrew Morton's low-latency patch made obsolete by other improvements in kernel 2.6 or does it still need to be ported to 2.6?

His page shows patches for 2.2.x and 2.4.x kernels only.

Re: Visiting the New World of Linux Sound & Music Software

Anonymous's picture

His patch is included in 2.6, as a configuration choice.

Re: Visiting the New World of Linux Sound & Music Software

Anonymous's picture

If this patch is in 2.6 and configurable, why is there no configuration paragraph? The 2.4.23-low-latency.patch has
one:

+Low latency scheduling
+CONFIG_LOLAT
+ This enables low latency scheduling, with reduces the scheduling
+ latency of the kernel. This makes the kernel more responsive, and
+ potentially increases its bandwidth; since threads waste less time
+ waiting for execution.
+
+ If you don't know what to do here, say Y.
+

If it were an option wouldn't there be some mention of CONFIG_LOLAT in the arch/i386/Kconfig file?

The 2.6.0 source tree doesn't contain CONFIG_LOLAT anywhere, nor some other keywords found in the 2.4.23 ll patch:

LOWLATENCY_DEBUG
lolat_stats

Also what happened to /include/linux/low-latency.h ?

Re: Visiting the New World of Linux Sound & Music Software

Anonymous's picture

2.6 is engineered to have low latency, it does not need an additional patch.
It does have an option you can turn on (the preemptible kernel option) that
_should_ result in latencies close to what was possible with the combination of
the low latency and preemptible kernel patches in 2.4.x.

-- Fernando

Re: Visiting the New World of Linux Sound & Music Software

Anonymous's picture

OK. Thanks for the clarification.

Re: Visiting the New World of Linux Sound & Music Software

Anonymous's picture

very nice article, but I really like to see PlanetCCRMA ruuning with BlackBox ;)

Re: Visiting the New World of Linux Sound & Music Software

Anonymous's picture

Try clicking the link!!! ;))

Re: Visiting the New World of Linux Sound & Music Software

Anonymous's picture

Just click on the link!! ;)))

White Paper
Linux Management with Red Hat Satellite: Measuring Business Impact and ROI

Linux has become a key foundation for supporting today's rapidly growing IT environments. Linux is being used to deploy business applications and databases, trading on its reputation as a low-cost operating environment. For many IT organizations, Linux is a mainstay for deploying Web servers and has evolved from handling basic file, print, and utility workloads to running mission-critical applications and databases, physically, virtually, and in the cloud. As Linux grows in importance in terms of value to the business, managing Linux environments to high standards of service quality — availability, security, and performance — becomes an essential requirement for business success.

Learn More

Sponsored by Red Hat

White Paper
Private PaaS for the Agile Enterprise

If you already use virtualized infrastructure, you are well on your way to leveraging the power of the cloud. Virtualization offers the promise of limitless resources, but how do you manage that scalability when your DevOps team doesn’t scale? In today’s hypercompetitive markets, fast results can make a difference between leading the pack vs. obsolescence. Organizations need more benefits from cloud computing than just raw resources. They need agility, flexibility, convenience, ROI, and control.

Stackato private Platform-as-a-Service technology from ActiveState extends your private cloud infrastructure by creating a private PaaS to provide on-demand availability, flexibility, control, and ultimately, faster time-to-market for your enterprise.

Learn More

Sponsored by ActiveState