Penguins for President?

Is there any significance to what Web server/platform combinations 2004 presidential candidates are using?

As we swing into the thick of the 2004 electoral playoffs, it's interesting to see what kinds of platforms are running under the candidates' official campaign Web sites. Netcraft has a handy feature called "What's that site running?" that lets us see combinations of Web servers and OS platforms. So here's a quick rundown, in alphabetical order:

For what it's worth, the Republican National Committee is running Microsoft IIS on Windows 2000, while the Democratic National Committee is running Apache on Linux.

As of this writing, November 5, 2003, the RNC has an uptime of 4.26 days (maximum of 39.04) and a 90-day moving average of 16.91. The DNC has an uptime of 445.02 days (also the maximum) and a 90-day moving average of 395.38 days.

Draw your own conclusions.

Doc Searls is Senior Editor of Linux Journal.

email: doc@ssc.com

______________________

Doc Searls is Senior Editor of Linux Journal

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Re: Yeah, stop those orbital mind control satellites!

Anonymous's picture

Yeah, but it won't really help, since most of the TV satellites are operated by private companies.

Re: Penguins for President?

Anonymous's picture

um, John Edwards? WoW.

John Edwards.

Anonymous's picture

The senator from SC, not the no good two bit hack of a cold reader from television. John Edwards, TV star: I will hack you to bits and THEN WE'LL SEE WHO TALK TO THE DEAD *****!

Re: John Edwards.

Anonymous's picture

He is the senator from NC. He might have been born in SC but he had the good sense to move when he could.

Re: John Edwards.

Anonymous's picture

Fscking anti-southern bigot!

Re: Penguins for President?

Anonymous's picture

Good Lord!

If that ever happens I AM moving!

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