Cross-Platform Software Development Using CMake

Build your project on every system without knowing all the magic of creating executables and shared libraries.
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dependencies is an issue

Cross-platform's picture

sometimes dependencies not installed because of versions conflict. so you should select exact lib that you need.

SET_SOURCE_FILE_PROPERTIES sh

Anonymous's picture

SET_SOURCE_FILE_PROPERTIES
should be changed to
SET_SOURCE_FILES_PROPERTIES

Re: Cross-Platform Software Development Using CMake

Anonymous's picture

This sounds really cool. I may give CMake a try for my next new project.

Beware of the lack of documentation though...

Anonymous's picture

One inconvenient of CMAKE is that the documentation available online is very brief. If you want to do anything serious with it, I think buying the book is really necessary.

No worse than autohell

Anonymous's picture

The autotools suite suffers from the same lack of clear, simple docs and examples. CMake is at least easy to pick up.

Yep, needs documentation

Anonymous's picture

Seems like a very cool project. I'm trying to pick it up without the book, and I'm having a pretty hard time of it. More publicly available samples of how to do things would go a long way to helping the project reach a critical mass within the community.

You'd think they'd make it more obvious

Anonymous's picture

You can get a fairly comprehensive explanation of a lot of the variables using the command "cmake --help-html > cmake.html" - the resulting file is very useful and quite verbose.

Having said that, this still leaves you badly in need of worked examples.

How about teh KDE4 sources

Anonymous's picture

> this still leaves you badly in need of worked examples

The KDE4 WebSVN might provide quite a few working examples.

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