Linux Journal Press Releases "Linux in the Workplace" Under GNU FDL

NEW YORK, NY -- Linux Journal Press, an imprint of No Starch Press in partnership with Linux Journal, has announced that "Linux in the Workplace" will be released under the GNU Free Documentation License (FDL).

The book's contents will be linked from http://www.nostarch.com/ and http://www.linuxjournal.com/ beginning on February 15, 2003, the fourth anniversary of Windows Refund Day. This marks the third release from No Starch Press in an open format and the second under a free license. Linux Journal Press also published "The Linux Cookbook", by Michael Stutz, in 2001 under the Design Science License (DSL) and "Programming Linux Games", by John R. Hall, in a freely available format in 2002.

Written by the Linux Journal staff, "Linux in the Workplace" focuses on Linux desktop tools and how to use them in an office environment. Don Marti, editor-in-chief of Linux Journal, emphasizes the free software focus of "Linux in the Workplace" when he explains, "The free software desktop is infinitely customizable, and gives companies and users the ability to add any functionality. A license as free as the software is necessary to keep the information up-to-date and accurate."

This most recent release under the GNU FDL underscores the wealth of content now available under an open license. Bill Pollock, No Starch Press publisher, explains, "GNU Press published free books before anyone, and there are a handful of publishers who will risk the time and effort to openly publish a book. We are willing to take that risk because the benefits of a larger audience outweigh the potential loss of readers that choose not to buy the book." Bradley Kuhn, Executive Director of the Free Software Foundation, is pleased to see publishers that appreciate the commercial benefits of free publishing. "Free publishing is a perfect fit for the technical book market. We designed the GNU FDL specifically to address commercial concerns that publishers may have with free publishing." The decision to release "Linux in the Workplace" under the GNU FDL was an easy one. Phil Hughes, the publisher of Linux Journal, notes, "As publishers of documentation rather than software, publishing under the FDL is a logical way for us to maximize our contribution to the Open Source movement."

Michael Stutz, the architect of the DSL, was enthused to write for a publisher willing to consider an open license. "When I was writing The Linux Cookbook, releasing a book with a 'copyleft' license was unheard of; few publishers would consider it and even fewer had attempted it." John R. Hall released his book online after the initial publication, with positive results. "Everyone benefits from open publishing," says Hall. "Authors enjoy wider audiences, publishers realize more sales from free advertising, and readers get the high-quality electronic books they deserve." According to Pollock, the decision is up to the author. "We prefer that authors choose their own license when publishing with us, recognizing that not all authors are comfortable with an open license. As long as there are authors who want their works published openly, and as long as the books sell, then we see no reason to stop."

About Linux Journal PressLinux Journal Press publishes books on cutting-edge Open Source topics that help to advance the acceptance and usability of Open Source software. An imprint of No Starch Press (http://www.nostarch.com/), Linux Journal Press titles are developed in partnership with Linux Journal (http://www.linuxjournal.com/).

About No Starch PressSince 1994, No Starch Press has published unique and sometimes fringe books on computing topics, with a focus on Open Source, security, hacking, web development, programming, gaming, and alternative operating systems. Our titles have personality, our authors are passionate, and our goal is to make computing fun and accessible for everyone.

About Linux JournalLinux Journal is the premier Linux magazine, dedicated to serving the Linux community and promoting the use of Linux world-wide. A monthly periodical, Linux Journal is currently celebrating its eighth year of publication. Linux Journal may be purchased at all major bookstores and newsstands and may also be ordered by calling 1-888-66-LINUX, sending e-mail to subs@ssc.com or visiting http://www.linuxjournal.com/. For additional information about Linux Journal send e-mail to linux@ssc.com.

Media Relations Contact:

John Mark Walker, Marketing ManagerNo Starch Press555 De Haro Street, Suite 250, San Francisco, CA, 94107Phone: +1 415-863-9900 / Fax: +1 415-863-9950johnmark@nostarch.com

Rebecca Cassity, Marketing ManagerSpecialized Systems Consultants, Inc. (SSC)PO Box 55549, Seattle, WA, 98155Phone: +1 206-297-8653 / Fax: +1 206-782-7191rebecca@ssc.com

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Rebecca Cassity is the Director of Sales for Linux Journal

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