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I Have No Inetd and I Must...Telnet?

inetd on my system, Slackware 2.0.28, stops on occasion, barring access from telnet. Is there an easy way to automatically restart inetd if it dies?

—Mark Johnson, Mark.Johnson@InfoHarvest.ca

You're running an extremely old version of inetd, and some versions did have stability problems. Several solutions to your problem are available. If it is possible to upgrade your system, newer versions usually work fine, and you'll receive other benefits as well. If you'd like a replacement, try such alternatives as xinetd or daemontools, both of which are quite stable and add some features to the mix. However, if your cron service is trustworthy and you don't need to restart the service the second it dies, you might try running the following script every five minutes or so from cron:

#!/bin/sh
ISINETS=`ps ax | grep inetd |
grep -v grep | wc -l`
  if [ $ISINETD != 1 ]; then
     /usr/sbin/inetd
  fi

—Chad Robinson, crobinson@rfgonline.com

We've said this before, but please replace telnet with OpenSSH to avoid exposing your passwords and other sensitive data to the network. Packages for the OpenSSH client and server are available for all the Linux distributions, and compatible clients are available for every common platform. SSH is as easy to use as telnet, and it automatically encrypts your connection.

—Don Marti, dmarti@ssc.com

Setting the IP Address on SuSE

I'm operating SuSE 8.0 on my IBM ThinkPad 600E and am trying to connect to our LAN server at work. How do I configure TCP/IP so it automatically recognizes the addresses?

—Layla, satchumwatch@netscape.net

Run YaST2, the SuSE setup tool, and go to the Network address setup screen. Select Automatic address setup (via DHCP) to use a DHCP server if one is available, or select Static address setup and fill in an IP address and subnet mask to set the address manually.

—Don Marti dmarti@ssc.com

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printing issues

Tim Gershikov's picture

Hello. My name is Tim Gershikov. I am an assistant network admin for Bass & Associates in tucson, AZ. We have a linux Red Hat computer that does not print one specific file only. We use mozilla to connect to internet, than adobe to read the files. I already downloaded a package of all the gentium fonts, but it didn't help. I believe there is a problem between the printer (HP 4000) and the fonts on postscript renderer. See, it opens the file and we can see it, but once we send it to the printer, it prints in squares. We also established that that file prints of Windows-based PC's that are running Mozilla, but not of Linux-based PC's. I was wondering if you could help me out, and tell me what do I need to download or do in order for me to fix this problem. Thank you so much for your time. My e-mail address is: tgershikov@bass-associates.com

printing issues

Tim Gershikov's picture

Hello. My name is Tim Gershikov. I am an assistant network admin for Bass & Associates in tucson, AZ. We have a linux Red Hat computer that does not print one specific file only. We use mozilla to connect to internet, than adobe to read the files. I already downloaded a package of all the gentium fonts, but it didn't help. I believe there is a problem between the printer (HP 4000) and the fonts on postscript renderer. See, it opens the file and we can see it, but once we send it to the printer, it prints in squares. We also established that that file prints of Windows-based PC's that are running Mozilla, but not of Linux-based PC's. I was wondering if you could help me out, and tell me what do I need to download or do in order for me to fix this problem. Thank you so much for your time. My e-mail address is: tgershikov@bass-associates.com

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