Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Office

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Learn how CodeWeaver's CrossOver Office can simplify your move to an all-Linux platform.

For many, making the move to Linux is an easy step. Based on the facts that Linux is fast, stable and of course, free, it's not difficult to see why so many folks are making the move away from the world of Windows. As Linux desktop converts, we do need to accept some limitations, at least in the office applications category. While there are very good open-source office applications and even full office suites, none of them are a complete replacement for, or are fully compatible with, Microsoft's office suite. So for Linux to continue to succeed on the desktop (or laptop for that matter), a better solution to the office application shortage needs to be resolved.

I think most would agree that Microsoft Office is a good product. With rich features, strong toolset and relative ease of use, it has become the de facto office suite for many users and corporations alike. With that in mind, wouldn't it be ideal if we could run the MS Office suite on top of Linux? In this way, we could keep our beloved office programs--and compatibility with most of the world's business population--and work in a much more stable environment under Linux.

Now, how do we go about accomplishing this near-perfect balance between compatible office suite functionality and OS stability? Well, this article takes a look at one such product that does exactly what it claims to do: runs Microsoft Office 97 and 2000 on top of your Linux OS. And as an added bonus, run Outlook so that many of us finally can access our corporate mail and calendars from Exchange, while working from a Linux box.

Wine Is Good for You

For the past year, I have been using Linux exclusively on my laptop and desktop computers, and am continually impressed by the stability, reliability and sheer performance. Those who work around me on even faster, more modern computers can be heard mumbling and groaning about how slow their OS has become over time, or about how the system grinds away at its page file after booting and of course my personal favorite--the blue screen! I used to be one of these people, but since moving away from the Windows OS completely, I no longer have to deal with the annoyances and lost data associated with Window's inherent instability.

Over the past couple of years I have been following the Wine Project, which has a charter to create an environment that would allow Linux users to run specific Windows applications within their favorite Linux environment. Considering Windows applications are dependent upon the Windows API and the presence of DLL's, OCX's, etc., the Wine group's task is not an easy one. Plus, up until now, installing and configuring Wine to run Windows applications has not been as successful or easy as many would like.

But recently I discovered an application that utilizes the incredible work from the folks in the Wine Project, allowing users to install an environment to run applications from the Microsoft office suite easily. I have been looking desperately for a solution to run Outlook and MS Office, because the corporation I work for is running 100% MS Office and Outlook/Exchange. There are a lot of Linux SMPT and POP mail utilities, but not much in the way of getting dynamic data from Exchange servers into Outlook (i.e., calendar events). The folks at Ximian do have an excellent-looking Outlook replacement client called Evolution, and the newly released "Exchange Connector", but only for Exchange 2000 (and we are still on Exchange 5.5).

Enter CodeWeavers

CodeWeavers has incorporated the Wine Project's code into a product called CrossOver Office. The real beauty lies in CrossOver Office's simplicity. All a user has to do is run a simple install script that creates the necessary environment to install MS Office and Outlook. Best of all, the CrossOver Office product costs a reasonable $54.95 US and is downloadable from the CodeWeaver's web site, as is the free 30-day trial product.

Before installing CrossOver Office, decide if the installation of MS Office is to be specific to an individual user, or a group of users that log in to the system. If your requirements are the former, you will want to install CrossOver Office while logged in to the system with your user name. But if you prefer the multi-user install, log in as root to perform the installation. As always, refer to the CrossOver Office documentation and help screens. To install CrossOver Office for a single user (we'll use me as an example), change to the directory to which you downloaded the script file, and type the following from the command line (see also Figure 1):

[jsmcdon1@nettech01-mobl jsmcdon1]$ sh install-crossoffice.1.0.1.sh

If this is the first time you have installed CrossOver Office, you will see the user-install options screen (mentioned previously) and shown in Figure 2. The CrossOver Office installer will begin by showing a uniquely worded EULA (End User License Agreement) screen, followed by the installation options screen shown in Figure 3. Accept the default values for installation location, unless you need to have CrossOver Office installed somewhere else. Click Begin Install, and in less than a minute you are greeted with the form shown in Figure 4, which gives you the option to configure CrossOver Office and begin your installation of MS Office. At the time of this writing, CrossOver Office supports Microsoft Office 97 and 2000, and Lotus Notes, but other applications are being added in future releases (see CodeWeaver's web site for a current listing of supported applications).

All you need to do next is click the Add button and point CrossOver Office to the installation location of your MS Office application(s). After that, you will be greeted with the familiar MS Office installer screen. From this point on, just install MS Office as you would on any Windows box, selecting options you want installed.

Note: at the time of this writing, both MS Access and Visio 2000 were not supported, but have been reported to work in some installations. CodeWeavers is working toward building support for these and many other applications into future releases.

Once the Office installation is completed, you should have a working set of MS Office binaries. If you look in the /home/your_user_id directory under /cxoffice/bin, you will see individual binaries for Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook (depending on which applications you installed). Try launching one of them by either typing the name on the command line or by clicking on the binary from your particular file manager application.

When I launched Word 2000 on my laptop and had all the menus and options that I would expect to see, the real kick for me was finally being able to have full access to most of Outlook's functionality (with some caveats of course), and get my calendar from our corporate exchange servers. Not being able to read attachments sent from other users or have access to my calendar dynamically was a real pain, and resulted in missed meetings and the inability to view attached files with the correct formatting. While StarOffice and KOffice are great products, neither could replace fully my dependency on MS Office and Outlook in my corporate work environment.

______________________

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Any one can help me how can I install linux with XP

Abdur rahim's picture

Hello friends!!

Actually I wanna know that How can I install LINUX with WINDOWS XP. Windows XP already install on my pc in C: drive and whenever three drive are free so can I install LINUX in other drives?
And can I use microft's programs like MS Office, MSN and many others on linux. Please anyone tell me on this mail address: rahim.abdur4@gmail.com

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

jcridge's picture

Many of the "just bite the bullet and completely move to Linux/OpenOffice/StarOffice" arguments here sound reasonable until you realize that some of us are evaluating Linux on the desktop for 2000+ employee companies that span many different departments (Finance, Marketing, Sales, Business Development, etc.) not just IT. Most of our users are simply application users (not really computer users) who only care that the application they use is as familiar, simple and painless to use as possible to accomplish their job. Given that many such companies have already rolled out the entire MS suite of applications means a migration to Linux and OpenOffice/StarOffice will involve a lot of changes. I don't know how many of you are in very large businesses, but implementing change on this level can be a very painful experience, especially for the person tasked at implementing the change.

For the past six months I've looked at using Linux on the desktop (I've used it at home for years) and I believe some departments are more ideally situated than others to make the switch, but I was very disappointed at the lack of cross document support between OpenOffice/StarOffice 7 and the current MS Office suite. I've opened highly formated (very common in larger businesses) MS Powerpoint presentations and Excel spreadsheets in StarOffice 7 only to be presented with garbage. The cross document support just isn't were it needs to be for the larger businesses to make the leap to either OpenOffice or StarOffice. Thus, in this situation, an application like Codeweavers is VERY appealing.

OpenOffice Anyone?

Anonymous's picture

Who needs CrossOver Office when a viable FREE alternative to MS Office already exists? I currently run OpenOffice on both my Linux and Windows machine.

Re: OpenOffice Anyone?

Anonymous's picture

OpenOffice sucks. One thing they should do is copy cat MS-Office interface and functionality. OpenOffice is dysfunctional, no e-mail, poor DOC handling and what not. Let's face it, it has a long way to go. I run Linux on my laptop, I love it but I will not give up MS-office since its top of the line. I am willing to settle for IE 5.5 rather then running crappy Netscape.

I only have to agree here,

Martie's picture

I only have to agree here, with all due respect, OO is still way behind MSO in many aspects, including addins, extensions etc. We simply need to live with the fact that business dictates us to go for MS, and even if my personal preference would be OO, if what I produce by OO is not 100% readable for my business partners who pay me my cash, I must and I will use MS (to live).

Re: OpenOffice Anyone?

Anonymous's picture

Yse, however, there are more programs that run only on Win32 platforms than just Word, Powerpoint, Access and Excel.

Re: OpenOffice Anyone?

Anonymous's picture

For example people who receive time management info regularly trough a M$exchange server. Unfortunately they have to use outlook.

(if you know a working method to connect to the exchange server for getting/putting time mgmt data correctly, info would highly be appreciated)

As far as my experiences extend, the cross compatibility between OpenOffice and M$Office is not 100% working

There are a lot of formatting which is not appearing in one or other application correctly. Since currently most of the business correspondence are in M$something, if you need to be sure, your electronic refenrence is readable at the other party, you (unfortunately) need some M$ software.

I really hope that OO will expand soon, but till this, CrossoverOffice will help to many people.

jcsotai@usa.net

Re: OpenOffice Anyone?

Anonymous's picture

Isn't evolution now capable of M$ Exchange servers?

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

The biggest problem with linux is crappy fonts. I am using mandrake 8.2, and the fonts look really ugly and crude, no matter what application I am using (Open office, Abiword or staroffice). The fonts in Openoffice on windows look perfectly fine, but on linux they are look crude. Until this problem is fixed, no one would consider serious office development on linux platform

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

The biggest problem with linux is crappy fonts. I am using mandrake 8.2, and the fonts look really ugly and crude, no matter what application I am using (Open office, Abiword or staroffice). The fonts in Openoffice on windows look perfectly fine, but on linux they are look crude. Until this problem is fixed, no one would consider serious office development on linux platform

Well... I still don't know how to fix fonts issues in OpenOffice but you can get anti-aliased font display in KDE 3 and every KDE/QT program related properly compiled using the most recent QT version. It gives you a beautiful desktop environment and office suite when you're using KOffice (which is enough to me since I'm not a kinda Office user guy).

The upcoming GNOME 2 have anti-aliased font display, too. And in both cases, it's right out-the-box regardless the Linux distro you're using. I've also seen some people working in bring AA display to Mozilla to and that's is the only place where I really miss such feature. So, it won't be a issue for so long.

Cheers,

DeadFish Man

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

Mandrake 8.2 can import all your Windows fonts and they will work in OpenOffice.org. (Providing that you have Windows installed on your box and Linux can access the Windows Petition) Go to Drakfont to import. You can run Drakfont in a terminal to start it. It worked great for me and I have all the Windows fonts working perfectly in OpenOffice.org running on Mandrake 8.2. Check it out.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

Try installing a nicer font package. Installing Xfonts-75dpi or even 100dpi, smooth fonts or some sort of font package that's proper for your distribution will do the trick.

Consider NeTraverse's Win4Lin 4.0

Anonymous's picture

If OpenOffice, GnuCash, Evolution, etc. don't do it for you, and you need to run Windows apps and have a licensed copy of Windows, I would take a good look at Win4Lin 4.0 (http://www.netraverse.com). For a little more money ($89.99 vs. $54.95 for CrossOver Office), you can run most Windows apps -- including many that CrossOver can't handle. VMWare can handle even more apps, but it's a *lot* more expensive ($299).

I've been running Win4Lin 4.0 for the past few months at home and have been very happy with it. It runs all my MS Office 97 apps just fine. I also run Quicken, IE 5.5, PrintMaster Gold, a bunch of kids' games, and other software on it.

Disadvantages for me: Win4Lin currently doesn't support DirectX (neither does CrossOver) or accessing USB devices (don't know if CrossOver does). I believe VMWare supports both.

Consider NeTraverse's Win4Lin 4.0

Keith Daniels's picture

I've been a longtime user of Win4Lin but I can't reccomend it until they manage to get copy and paste back and forth from Linux and Windows fixed and the speed back close to what it was in the Win 98 versions..

Their Pro 2.0 version has XP and 2000 performance problems, though they have imporoved the 2000 speed in the last 3 months and if the programs you need to run are not CPU hogs the performance is reasonable enough to work with. I have not tried using XP since the latest incremental version was released so I don't know if it was also improved or not, they claim it was.

I highly suggest that you try the demo version and make sure that it does what you need.

The previous (and still available if you want it) Win 98 version was fantastic.

"I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone.
My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone."
-- Bjarne Stroustrup

Consider NeTraverse's Win4Lin 4.0

Anonymous's picture

Well, you can try 'qemu' (http://fabrice.bellard.free.fr/qemu/about.html), instead of vmware.
You can install the full windowsxp on it. It's simple and free.

They've still done a good job

Anonymous's picture

True, it is propagating the m$ machine. However, until some companies are willing to use OpenOffice (and honestly, I don't know why not), this might cushion the blow.
But, most shops that are m$ will probably take the abuse as "oh well, that's what our clients use, so we'll pay.." and stay where they are.
On the job I use cxoffice for IE exclusively. Unfortunately, that's our 'base line', even tho our actual product runs on Linux, Resin and JBoss. Go figure. The IE install still has some quirks (bookmarking doesn't work, for instance), but all in all it's better than using VMWare. I'm the only guy on the dev team not using VMWare and when someone comes over to check out some issue, for a second they kinda look at my desktop weird, wondering where VMWare is. ;)
All in all, if you *have* no other choice, cxoffice is cool. But for office apps themselves, OpenOffice works great.

Re: They've still done a good job

Anonymous's picture

True, it is propagating the m$ machine. However, until some companies are willing to use OpenOffice (and honestly, I don't know why not), this might cushion the blow.
Well a lot of Linux friendly shops made the mistake that I made seven years ago. I wrote some mini apps in Winword and Access and now we are locked in. (rewriting the apps is not something that can just happen.) but If CodeWeavers supported Access and MSMoney (I suspect Money will work as It's just an extention to IE6) All but One of our XP boxes would get a there next security update from Debian.
I have not tried getting all of our Winword Macros to work with OpenOffice.org (I know that the macros require some porting to work on Macword, so I hold out little hope for getting our Macros that do things like fetch ZIP+4 from the net to work with OpenOffice.org but I've had to rewrite a lot of them over the years so one more rewrite isn't that big a deal), but if Access and Winword were on all of our Linux boxes, I could make all of our new utilites in *NIX and In a couple years We would be free of Microsoft lock in.

Re: I did have some non-trivial problems with this software

Anonymous's picture

I got codeweavers and installed it along with one of the

first editions of office 97. It did not install easily. For one

thing, when you say install office, it works fine but I only

saw a Microsoft button for excell and not word. I did the

teck support thing and they told me to go one level down and

run setup.exe within the word part of the cd and then run

setup.exe within the excell part of the cd to get the two.

This works fine but it did cost me some time to sort it all

out. I wish codeweavers would put up a chart with one

axis distribution (Red hat 6.1, 6.2, Suzie, etc,

and the other office product (like 97, 2000

standard, 2000 premium, etc). This is what suzie

does with Oracle help on their web page.

I bet that would save

money for their teck support answering the same questions

again and again. After installing it, it ran fine but I could

not get the equation editor. I called tech support again

and they said I would need to install like ie5 dynamic module

or something first. I would need to get that from CD or

Microsoft it it was not on my CD. It wasn't on this early

97 CD and I didn't want to try to get it from Micr. so I gave

up on 97. With 2000, it went much better but clippy does

not work too well as they even admit. That would not

be so bad except that clippy seems to be well ingrained

with their help system. I have never used office before so

I need all the help I can get. I also have to install office on

machines that go to grad students that may not know office

and they deserve the full product. For us, codeweavers was

a nice try but we went back to windows.

Really good product

Anonymous's picture

I've purchased it for my home office computer. I had office from a previous life so it made sense to get it to do a bit of work... especially that I sometime use third party spreadsheets with password protected areas and SO just won't open them.

Everything installled easily enough and support has been really quick to answer my queries.

Recommandable for anyone who can afford MSoff or can't produce of open the documents they have to.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

With great office suites like OpenOffice.org, which is free, and StarOffice, which is reasonably priced with support, why does anyone really need Microsoft Office? Other than needing Outlook until a conversion to Evolution, et al, or if a business has gotten itself in a mess with a Microsoft specific product or a coercive pricing plan, there really isn't any reason to stay with MS. This goes for MS Windows too. Think about it!

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

I have to use IE to fill out my timesheet! No other browser will work (I've tried them all)

This is a great convenience to me!

I also need to deal with office files. No, none of the so-called compatible products work 100%. This is all or nothing. I've got work to do. It either handles equations correctly or forget it.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

I have to use IE to fill out my timesheet! No other browser will work (I've tried them all)

This is a great convenience to me!

I also need to deal with office files. No, none of the so-called compatible products work 100%. This is all or nothing. I've got work to do. It either handles equations correctly or forget it.

Perhaps this is one of the best examples of customer lock-ins. Do you know that this timesheet you use probably uses ActiveX or DHTML stuff that only works properly in IE, but it could be done in something like Perl, PHP or even plain ASP?

One of my customers, mostly webdesigners (No! I'm not the sysadmin, but one of the guys of the support staff), asked us why the hell the administration system that he did in ASP wasn't working in his customer's browsers. When I tried in Mozilla, it really failed but worked fine in the IE of my buddies here.

When we've looked at the source code (HTML source, not the ASP source), we've found several VBScript scripts that performed what he claims that wasn't working properly. Then I turned back to the moron and said "Well... Of course it wouldn't work for your customer: He's using Netscape and VBScript works only in Internet Explorer. If you want this thing to work in others browsers, you should use Javascript".

Now just think about you, in a school, cybercafe, shopping center or somewhere else with a public connection to the Internet but without Internet Explorer. Those Internet appliances, kiosks ans stuff like that usually are using Linux (and even OS/2 in some cases). Now just think you should enter information on this timesheet thing in one of that places. You couldn't.

But it would work fine in almost any browser if it was done using standard technologies, even in IE (You know, standard compliance isn't exactly why IE is known for...).

I agree that OO or the others office suites for Linux still doesn't have filters to import or export MSOffice files perfectly, but only when there are VBA envolved that I think it becomes a issue. Most problems are aestheticaly related and can be fixed easily.

And Microsoft have said that XML will be the default file format for MSOffice, so this won't be a problem for so long.

Regards,

DeadFish Man

Oh! Please forgive my poor English. We don't talk English here in Brazil... :-)

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

Well, yes, perhaps. However, this comment neglects the fact that for the average user the problem with Star-/Openoffice is that it isn't MS Office. I have a Win98 box at home for games and fun mostly, which I have tried to keep free from as much MS stuff as possible (slight oxymoron, but bear with me ;-)). Therefore I have installed Openoffice and I asked my wife to use that. She's smart and not terribly fond of MS but since she has never used anything other than Word for word processing, the fact that Writer does not work as Word makes it almost impossible to work efficiently - she (and I dare say most other users) has very little patience for relearning how to do simple things. This becomes clear when installing the still lousy dictionaries that are available for free (I know, you get what you pay for...), which makes spellchecking a pain. To my wife's credit, she has been quite persistent in trying Openoffice, but the effort of locating features that are easier to access using MSWord (and sometimes easier to use), and finding that some useful features are missing (I don't really know what specifically she finds lacking) became too much. So, sadly, MS Office is now back on that machine. This experience also tells me that when I finally go all the way with Linux, Crossover Office will be an essential part of what I install if I want to stay friends with my wife...

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

I work in the publishing industry. Almost all the work we do HAS to be done in MS Word. All of the editing gets done on .doc files with the "track changes" feature turned on, and the typesetting programs the compositors use require .doc files as input. There's just no way to get around it.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

Have you actually tried using Staroffice? Also, you are aware that businesses don't exist in a bubble? The standard for business communication is the Word format, and Staroffice has only limited support for that. Staroffice is also slow, and missing many features. I have tried OpenOffice, SO6.0, and a number of other Linux word processors, and prefer to run Word through Crossover. It is a mature product, which cannot be said of Staroffice.

And by the way: evolution is not as good as you think it is. You can not "convert" to evolution unless you use 100% Linux (how many businesses can honestly say that?). It also lacks an integrated server component, forcing you to use exchange.

The truth is: there isn't yet a solution that is as good as Office or Exchange. And businesses need working solutions, not ideologies. Saving $500 per workstation (a trivial amount) while decreasing productivity is not a good thing.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

> The standard for business communication is the Word format,

> and Staroffice has only limited support for that.

Nice M$ FUD but you are wrong! you probably one of those Mickeysoft zealots that don't like to see the better solution win if it ain't M$.

Support for *all* of Microsoft Office proprietary formats is excellent in OpenOffice.org 1.0.1. In the rare case that something can not be properly imported, report it on the users@openoffice.org mailinglist and the OpenOffice.org/ StarOffice/Sun developers are extremely responsive in fixing it. Like Sun does not understand that compatiblity with M$ formats is an absolute prerequisite for business to switch to a non-M$ aka Sun solution... M$ has announced that XML will be the name of the game with Office11 (or whatever they call it tomorrow). Since XML is open SO or OOo will be as compatible as can be.

> The truth is: there isn't yet a solution that is as good as

> Office or Exchange.

Wow, do you work for M$ or something. Wrong again. Do I have to remember you that M$ threathened HP to cut them off as OEM if they continued with the selling of OpenMail, a vastly superior fully Exchange compatible Grouware solution that was efficient, stable, scalable, secure and ran on *nix platforms (gave ol' Bill sleepless nights). Unfortunately for M$ Samsung bought it (nice one HP!) and Samsung could not care less about M$ and their ways of doing biz (Asian culture and the fact that they are vastly bigger than M$). Nicest part about this is SamsungContact as it's called is vastly cheaper than Exchange. It runs on Linux and tons of other platforms, has Groupware Linux, Win and other clients and the first 5 user licenses are free.

Maybe you should review and try non M$ solutions out there before you spread your silly FUD. Intelligent people do.

Cheers,

Patrick

Try reading documents with a linked table of contents and you wi

Anonymous's picture

All of our corporate Docs use many different word features that do not work in openoffice or any open source solution.

Sure openoffice is fine as long as you just want basic formating but try reading in a word doc with a linked table of contents or a doc with a vision object added to it. Suddenly word starts to shine.

Until open source can do ALL the tricks word can do I will never be able to make the case to use it over Microsoft. It's not a money issue alone. Features that people have been using for 5 years play into the decision heavily and franky the open souce stuff still isn't there yet.

The sooner all of the Linux Fanboys deal with the fact that is still not as good as MS, the sooner it might actualy get better. Until then Code weavers is an acceptable solution.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

One caveat regarding XML. The XML CDATA section can contain just about anything. Microsoft is perfectly able to claim XML compatability will dumping proprietary information into the CDATA section. Best not speculate until we see what Microsoft is up to.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

considering the cost of microsoft's multiple licensing fees, $500 sounds prity low to me, kinda off the mark, and most users don't even have a need/use for most of the incompatible features in microsoft's products anyway. if microsoft were all it's cracked up to be I'd use it more often.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

I knew when I read the article that there would probably be nothing but negative reactions, since he dares to use a Microsoft product without saying how terrible it is.

But as the author stated several times, his shop uses MS Office and Outloook. Since he therefore is pretty much required to use these products as well, in order to maintain total compatibility with the rest of his shop, his best bet really is to do what he's done: Run Linux as his OS, run Crossover, and run MS Office and Outlook.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

sbassett's picture

This seems like a last resort for the extreme linux newbies. This is, after all, just propagating the use of a nice, yet HIGHLY expensive suite (last time I even looked in it's direction it was about 450-500 dollars). But if you've already fallen into the MS trap, it sounds like a good idea to make the migration. Hopefully more and more companies will take the hint from companies like Amazon and Verizon(who switched their programmers to linux workstations running open office- avg saving per station about 19,000 bucks). Anyway that is enough of my silly ranting for now.

Why Not Just Use OpenOffice

jman22's picture

I don't under stand people trying to make using linux more difficult, and more expensive. If people are concerned about portability between win32 and linux, why not use a free program on both systems, or use staroffice at a significantly lower cost. Doesn't that make since?

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

I agree with this assessment. If you are that married to MS then this is a good option for the standard MS programs like Outlook, Powerpoint and Word. But if you are running Access then your troubles aren't over. Of course why anyone would run Access is beyond me...

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

There is a danger of following OS/2 path with this.

People must be encouraged to write native Linux apps.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

Where did that $19,000 figure come from? I'm willing to believe it if there's research or evidence to back it up, but it sounds pretty high to me.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

I read the $19,000 figure in an article on the NY Times web site a few months ago.

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Terry's picture

I think that also was supposed to include support costs and admin costs...

Re: Running MS Office under Linux with CodeWeaver's CrossOver Of

Anonymous's picture

It might be realistic if you take into account the huge prices of development software and specialized software.

i've had postive experiences

Anonymous's picture

i've had postive experiences with both crossover with MS OFFICE and openoffice. I am waiting for open office 2.0 final (i have used the test version availble and thought it very good. I need crossover and ms office for my parents as its a big enough change to linux for them anyway!!

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