Is Linux Infrastructure? Or Is it Deeper than that?

The commercial infrastructure we call "the commons" depends on something deeper that Hollywood still doesn't understand. Linux and the Net are both part of it. Let's call it "innerstructure."

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email: doc@ssc.com

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Doc Searls is Senior Editor of Linux Journal

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Re: Is Linux Infrastructure? Or Is it Deeper than that?

Anonymous's picture

I don't think that's correct. Ultra and supra are the words you're thinking of. Infra is roughly the same as inter, which is also synonymous with inner. Pesky Latin!

Re: Is Linux Infrastructure? Or Is it Deeper than that?

Anonymous's picture

infra means below, not within. "Below, beneath, under, after" (from Merriam-Webster's 1913 unabridged dictionary). So why are you coining a new word?

Re: Is Linux Infrastructure? Or Is it Deeper than that?

Doc's picture

You're right. I had read my sources wrong. I had mistaken infra- for intra- . See here.

Yet I still believe we need a term that applies to regions deeper than infrastructure. Subinfrastructure might be more accurate, as a Latin derivative, than innerstructure.

Not sure it will read as meaningfully, however.

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