Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

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New beta distribution includes many of the recent releases from KDE, XFree86, Mozilla and other projects, making it easy, stable and powerful on your desktop.

The Linux community has remained active, developing improved software, and the desktop environment also continues to improve. Both the KDE and GNOME projects have added functionality, improved performance and made the desktop environment more fun and usable. The XFree86 project has continued to improve hardware support. The overall appearance, quality and selection of fonts continues to improve.

Red Hat has been working to incorporate many of these improvements into their next release of software. While Red Hat is probably best known for their Linux server systems, their desktop systems have undergone considerable improvement. Their latest development effort, code named "Skipjack", incorporates a number of these improvements.

My personal interest in Skipjack arose mainly because this release includes a test version of KDE 2.99, which is really KDE 3.0 Release Candidate 3. I was so excited about this release because there have been claims of great performance improvements. In fact, the final version of KDE 3.0 was announced on April 3.

So, how well does Skipjack, Red Hat 7.3 Beta Release 2, meet my expectations? Very well, indeed.

I installed Red Hat 7.2 on my Dell Dimension 4100 desktop computer a few weeks ago. Then I ordered a copy of Skipjack from Tech Broker. The unsupported download release came in a five CD package. Tech Broker CDs usually cost $4 per CD, so ordering Red Hat's Skipjack test release from Tech Broker cost $20. (You can download Skipjack during the testing period from ftp.redhat.com/pub/redhat/linux/beta/skipjack.) I decided to install Skipjack as an update to the 7.2 distribution to see how well that would work.

I was very impressed with the results. It took between 30 and 40 minutes to complete the installation. Most of that time was spent detecting the existing software and determining which packages needed to be upgraded. On my system, I used the Workstation configuration (Red Hat installations provide a choice of Workstation, Server or Custom package selections). In addition to the Workstation packaging category, I also selected the option to modify the selection group and install any other software that I'm interested in. (I tend to install extra text editors, web browsers, and e-mail programs; these are the tools that interest me most).

The installation was flawless. Every menu was clear and concise. Every screen provided an explanation of the choices to make, so it is not even necessary to read a manual in order to install the software (if you are at least somewhat familiar with software installations). The appearance of the Red Hat software installation program is familiar; if anything, the graphics, explanations on each screen and mechanics of performing the installation are more streamlined than ever.

For those who have not installed or upgraded Red Hat software in a while, GRUB is now the default boot loader, though LILO remains available. The default GRUB boot loader now offers optional password security. If the system you're using is located in a public place where you have a need to secure the system loading process, this is a much-needed improvement (though it does not address the issue of physical system security, nor does it prevent someone from booting the system from a floppy disk). Still, this touch is a good idea, and it's not found on many other Linux distributions.

What about the desktop? I mentioned that I was interested in trying out KDE. How well does it work? It is incredible! I'd heard that there might be as much as a 40% improvement in the overall memory usage and performance of KDE 3.0 over KDE 2.2.2. While I did not confirm those numbers, I can attest that the Skipjack implementation of KDE is both solid and fast.

The Konqueror file manager and web browser and the KMail e-mail application are two core KDE applications, and like the KDE infrastructure, they have undergone appearance, functionality and performance improvements. Konqueror has much improved JavaScript support, major improvements in DHTML capability and fast loading times, to the point that Konqueror is worth considering as my main web browser.

KMail is KDE's full-featured and user-friendly e-mail client and supports both the popular IMAP and POP3 mail standards. Users can have multiple accounts and multiple identities. (Previous versions allowed multiple accounts to a limited degree, allowing you to read from multiple POP3 and IMAP4 servers but not allowing you to send to multiple SMTP destinations). Its address book is based on the vCard address book standard and is shared with the rest of KDE.

I don't personally use all of the KDE applications and tools, but it bears mentioning that the Personal Information Management (PIM) tools provided in KDE have also undergone considerable improvement. The list of PIM components in the Skipjack implementation of KDE 3.0 include:

  • KMail, the e-mail client

  • KAddressBook, an address book viewer/frontend for the K Desktop Environment

  • KOrganizer, the calendar and scheduling program for the K Desktop Environment

  • KPilot, a replacement for the Palm Desktop software from Palm Inc, which makes your Palm/Palm Pilot/Visor computer capable of exchanging information with your Linux-powered computer

  • Kandy, a tool to provide synchronization of phonebook, organizer and other data on your mobile phone with the data stored on the desktop

  • KArm, a tool that tracks time spent on various tasks. It is useful for tracking hours to be billed to different clients or to find out what percentage of your day is spent playing Doom or reading Slashdot.

  • KNotes, a small tool to scribble down some notes

  • KAlarm, a quick way of setting up personal alarm/reminder messages. The messages pop up on the screen at the time you specify.

In addition to the core desktop functionality and PIM capabilities outlined above, KDE also has a growing office suite called KOffice.

The following parts of the KOffice suite are being developed:

  • KWord, a frame-based word processor capable of professional standard documents

  • KSpread, a powerful spreadsheet application

  • KPresenter, a full-featured presentation program

  • Kivio, a Visio-style flowcharting application

  • Kontour,a vector drawing application

  • Krita, a raster-based image manipulation program like The GIMP or Adobe Photoshop

  • Kugar, a tool for generating business quality reports

  • KChart, an integrated graph and chart drawing tool

I don't use the KOffice suite often, but I can tell you that KWord is quite capable of reading basic Word documents. Advanced features, such as embedding Active X controls, cannot be handled by the KOffice tools, but in fairness, few if any competing office suites can accurately render all of the features found in Microsoft's latest arsenal of office applications. IF you're looking for a functional office suite that is bundled with a system, however, this suite is worth a look.

So far, I've mentioned that Skipjack installs effortlessly, contains a new boot loader that works well and has security improvements, incorporates most of what will be found in the final KDE 3.0 desktop and runs well. What about the other features?

Another thing I use my system for frequently is web browsing. Red Hat delivers here, too. As part of the available software, Red Hat includes not only the browsers that are integral components of the desktop managers, it also includes recent releases of the Netscape and Mozilla suites. You can choose between the "old style" version 4 Netscape browser, Netscape Communicator 4.79 and the most current release of the Mozilla browser, 0.99. Both browsers have web browser and e-mail client components.

Speaking of browsers, I have to mention the Galeon Web browser, which is included in the Skipjack release as part of the GNOME desktop environment. While Galeon requires both Mozilla and GNOME libraries in order to function, other than the obvious disk overhead, Galeon is a very effective and efficient web browser. Skipjack comes with the newest and best version of Galeon I've seen yet, version 1.2.0. Galeon is arguably one of the leading standards compliant web browsers currently available. So Skipjack gets my nod for including a very up-to-date and usable version of Galeon.

What about GNOME, the default desktop environment included in Red Hat distributions? The Skipjack release, as far as I can tell, does not incorporate any upcoming test releases of GNOME software. The good news, however, is that the Nautilus File Manager, which is a core component of the overall GNOME, seems more stable than I've seen in the past. Perhaps this is because the image rendering engine used with Nautilus is the Gecko engine that's part of the latest release of Mozilla. Since Mozilla 0.99 comes with the Skipjack release, Nautilus benefits from recent, significant improvements in Mozilla's functionality and reliability.

I have not touched on any of the server features found in Red Hat; that is beyond the scope of this review. During the installation, however, I did notice that Red Hat has continued to work on integrity, security and stability issues, and it really shows. Whether Red Hat decides to produce this software as an incremental update to it's existing release and calls the next release 7.3, or if they decide to create a new major release, from my perspective as a desktop user this is without question their best release ever. Even in beta form, it is solid.

I wrote this article using the Gvim text editor. I wrote the first part of the article while running the desktop using KDE, and I wrote the second part using GNOME. I tried out Konqueror, Konsole, KWord, Vim/Gvim, Netscape, Mozilla, Galeon, Nautilus, GNU Emacs, XEmacs, NEdit and GNOME Terminal, and I experimented with the GRUB boot loader. During my testing (while admittedly not exhaustive but representative of the kinds of daily tasks I perform) I did not encounter a single application or system failure. There probably are still some bugs out there, but this is great beta software, among the best that I've ever seen from anyone.

Was it worthwhile to run this release? Absolutely. While Red Hat explicitly recommends not running beta software in a production environment, if you are a desktop user like me and you like the latest software, you will be hard pressed to find a more complete and usable piece of software (at least until the other vendors incorporate this software into their release).

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7.3 Final: works on first go!

Anonymous's picture

Note: I am a very basic linux user.

I installed the old 7.2 on my T23 thinkpad and could not get X up and running, and even then with S3 drivers from their web site I could not get beyond 800x600 res. I didn't even think about trying to get sound to work!

I installed 7.3 (flawless installation!) and after it first boot up and I logged in, I decided just for the heck of it to try and see if X would work, assuming that it wouldn't. My first command after boot-up was 'startx'.

well it does work !!!!! I have a 1400x1050 screen res and 32 bit colour and 7.3 handles all that perfectly.

AND SOUND WORKS AS WELL!!!

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

It's about frickin time that Red Hat starts to look at linux as a desktop OS again and realize that it is time to acknowledge KDE as a much better window manager...like all the other distros have. Redhat is also starting to realize that they are taking too damm long to issue newer versions while SuSE is stealing the market from under them.

My Thoughts...

Anonymous's picture

First off I thought this article was very well, me being a KDE user I am excited to see the new KDE release, I use SuSE 7.0 Personal right now, and I love KDE, Gnome Just doesn't have the "feel" that I like. I have a red-hat distro and have never tried it out, I started out on win-linux 2000 then moved to mandrake 8.0 and bounced around from ditros like corel and others, and found that SuSE I enjoy the best, this article makes me think about going ahead and trying out Red-Hats newest distro, or even mine i have now..

However, When I read the comments that you people have written, it really its sad to see so many people that are "backing" linux just go off on article writers, and others posting comments.

I just wish the Linux "community" would drop some of these issues going on, we all obviously understand the concept of "open source" or we wouldn't be here in the 1st place, I like seeing new distros come out, which always makes me excited as a linux user, but some of you peole have such a bad attitude..

People always talking about how Linux has the potential to go soo far (which I believe it does) but when someone writes something about a distro and you just bash them for it, how are you helping the advance of Tux? Your not...

Which is worse? A propriety OS? Or an OS that has the potential to be on a hell of a lot more desktops, but people keep talking *****..

Grub having password capabilities, although LILO had/does have them as well, this is such a stupid thing to argue about...

You are just as nit-picky as a parent trying to buy the best gateway computer for their kid to talk on aim with...Ease up....Just be happy ur not running windoze haha

Re: My Thoughts...

Anonymous's picture

RedHat 7.3 Final

kfontinstaller causes core dumps. (Tried to install 2000 fonts)

Ark causes core dumps. (Large zip files, 800mb)

Fonts are still a nightmare in Linux.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Why don't you stop wining about Gnome v.s. KDE.
This discussion is soo bloated itself.
If you don't have anything more valuable to add
to the discussion, then don't.

Anyway, the article only covered a plain
vanilla installation
, which is simple on most distrubutions. I think that a review of this sort should
also cover some system configuration. For example, network configuration, NIS, soundcard, scanners, network updates, USB support and even manuals.
Maybe another review will follow this one.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Very good review. It is the kind of stuff that I wanted to know about. KDE 3, the install, stability, etc. I think that we all know the linux / unix flavors of operating systems make good servers. I am excited to see it when I can finally download a copy of it.

I just wish that Red Hat would incorperate some sort of product activation system. I don't feel like I'm being hasseled enough by big buisiness since I have switched OS's. Maybe I'll go over charge my debit card by a few cents so that I can get some over draft charges. That will make me feel normal again. Good job

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

lol...

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Still think Windows is best!

When you linux heads finally get it together and pull the obsolete bloatware out of Linux and get a common vision you might get somewhere!!

While you still seek to maintain backwards compatibility with decades old software with megabytes of libraries needed to run the most basic apps there is no hope!

The Linux kernel, networking and filesystems are the best but look to the future, optimise, and try not to preserve the past but learn from it.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Are you a BGG? (Bill Gates Groupie) Go waste data on someone elses server....

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Windows suffers from all of the same issues. A fully equipped Windows system (with Office, DirectX, IE5, and Win98SE) takes up 346MB for 'C:WINDOWS' and subdirectories alone, not counting the 'OS Essential' (according to MS) DLLs scattered throughout IE components in 'C:Program Files'

That's alot of OS, and that's 1999 vintage OS. XP takes 1.5GB according to MS. I know for a fact that current RH doesn't top a gig. Those 3 CDs are OPTIONS. To compare fairly in CD count, count Windows and Office together. After all, RH includes a few office suites, 2+ desktops, etc... It's several OSes on those 3 CDs, and unlike MS, you can install only the OS that you specifically need.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

i got into linux because windows sucks so much and i had a pc and i wanted to use it...now i am windows-free!!!!

but as for what os is the best.... i am running os 10.1.4 on my G4 and i just have to say that MacOS is the best os in production anywhere.

but RedHat and SuSE (and BeOS, for that matter) kick windows' butt.....

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Windows is the best at many things. Like crashing, freezing, and terminating applications unexpectedly. My install of RedHat 7.2 wasn't without some issues, but the 2 servers have run for 6 months without so much as a single crash, hang, or unexpected termination. I can't say the same for any version of Windows.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Windows is more easy to use than Linux.

There is absolutely no doubt about that. !!

all of you are arogant

Anonymous's picture

you all seem just to rant and rave about things that you all should do. instead of complaing why no try making your own better software or just not use it at all. These negitive comments do nothing but waste time so why not do something productive insteaded..

do to anal retentiveness comment complaing about my post are below

/ / / / /

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

FYI: According to a coworker, VMware doesn't work with this beta release.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Beta2 downgraded the glibc and that fixes the Vmware compatibility issue.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

NTFS read still needs a kernel re-compile. Is writing to NTFS dangerous?

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Yes, especially if you use windoze to write to it :-)

Re: NTFS Write support - dangerous

Anonymous's picture

Yes, NTFS Write support is dangerous. You have to run "ntfsfix" after unmounting it, in order to get chkdsk to run next time M$ WinNT loads, with no guarantee that it will actually work.

For more information, check out

linux-ntfs.sourceforge.net

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Quite... frustrated is the word actually.

After downloading ISO 1 and trying to do an install there were not enough packages to do the very basic install... ok so I head back and another 660mb download and I'm finally ready with ISO 2 - Disc 2 in hand... now I'm hallucinating for sure - it's asking me for Disc 3!!

Man the guys at redaht have gone loopy or something.. I mean sure a lot of people have DSL and Cable these days, but bandwidth still costs... why on earth they havn't done something with the lame installer i dont know - but all it takes is a simple package based dependency check based on which discs are available.

My final impression of Redhat 7.3 Beta 2 is that it is bloatware... Im giving up and installing Debian instead... hey if i want KDE 3 I can just grab a download and hey presto... what are you guys playing at?

"Redhat the new microsoft on the block" Booooo poor release guys and noot much new... just bloated even worse!

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

let me gat a hanky, and wipe the snot off your nose kiddie :)

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Why don't you just install the base of RedHat (so that you just have a booting Linux with X) and download the packages you need?

That's (in my opinion) the best you can do. in this way you don't have too much packages installed on you pc.

And if you really hate RedHat linux, make your own distro. But let us know where we can find it (I love to test it).

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

You could have done a network install to get just the packages you needed if you had bandwidth considerations.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

If you had actually READ the README's and such to see what exactly was on the CDs, and signed up for the SKipjack *beta test* list you would have understood that the first 3 discs are binaries, the second two are source.

Yes, it's a lot of downloading, but who do Red Hat make their money from? Mainly support, but boxed sets. And considering a boxed set deal, do you want a distribution that has EveryFreakingPackageOnEarth like Red Hat Skipjack (and whatever the release will be named) or one that's slimmer, but every time you want to install this or that package you have to go looking for it? Again, consider the basic user that might never download and install something besides what's on the CDs.

I think they COULD have organized the cds better to get the 'average' stuff on the first two cds and not require the third (although you would still want to have it, just maybe not have to swap yet another CD in) but that might be my range of applications I have installed, you can't possibly guess every package and shove them all on two cds, what would be on the third? Most likely a default installation doesn't even touch the third CD, but not sure, I always do upgrades.

Troll elsewhere, Red Hat is offering a complete distribution of software, one could have just about every possible application they could need without having to download anything, and that is their goal. I do wish that there were more installation options, the default install is rather large, which is fine for the average user, but for more expert installations you have to do a custom installation which is pretty slow to select everything.

Go play with debian, stop trolling. And don't whine about debian missing this or that.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Actually one of the reasons I switched from RH and Mdk was because I was sick 'n tired of searching rpmfind.net or Google for packages because RH & Mdk only come with precious few. Debian boasts over 3,900 packages way more than any other distro.

Nevertheless, I am curious to see how RH 7.3 performs. I might just DL 7.3 and try it on a spare box of mine.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

I'm not sure that you understand that this is a beta test. Of course the downloads are going to be huge, and the installation un-optimized. If everything was streamlined, it WOULDN'T BE A BETA TEST. I'm sure that the product will fit into roughly the same amount of space that release 7.2 did, after all the development and testing is done.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

oh yeah and by the way why isnt there REISER FS as an option during install?

because Redhat should be called baseball cap or something... lameware!

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

because Reiser FS has had a history of being flakey in certain situations (e.g. drives with some bad sectors) and Redhat doesn't want to risk causing their customers data loss.

you have to worry about things like that if you're selling an OS for enterprise use rather than just using it to show off to your buddies on IRC

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Does this version have any wizards to set internet connection sharing like the one in Mandrake?

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

In fact yes and it does a better job than Mandrake one.

Bad review

Anonymous's picture

You should go more under the hood, explain what there are for developers and sever software. As well as kernel features.. Not just desktop stuff

Re: Compatibility

Anonymous's picture

Not a single application failure?? Well, OK but most of what you used was newly installed/upgraded. What about all the existing X software, like XV, GIMP, gtoaster, xsane. I've seen vague rumors that KDE3 has compatibility issues, but never any details. Is there a list anywhere of what works, what doesn't?

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Just a word of warning to the adventurous.

3d does not work off a strait install. Not even the included 3d sceensavers. The kernel module loads, the XF86-4 config file is set, and nothing works.

I've tried everything I could think of.

I am running a voodoo 3000.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

I installed skipjack 7.3 from scratch on a P3 box (768mb ram) with a 3dfx Voodoo3 3500 card with 16mb video ram; and tuxracer plays fast and fine; I was also able to load Quake 3 no problems which plays fine. Apparently 3d acceleration works fine on my box straight from the cd install so to speak.

On the otherhand, using gnome, the custom-make gnome panel icon box CRASHES and only allows the default icon or transparent gnome foot.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Install the 3DFX X-server and it'll work.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Grub has been the default boot loader for redhat since 7.2, and had password support in that release. this is not a new feature of redhat 7.3 beta

Regards

Oliver Shanahan

RHCE

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review - Filesystems

Anonymous's picture

So, have they given us more choice than the data-integrity-paranoid, but slow as a snail Ext3?

I like RH, but their tendancy to try to ram software down customers throats (AnotherLevel/FVWM95, GNOME, Ext3, etc...) is annoying.

If you want to make Ext3 your default, fine. If you want to reccommend upgrading from Ext2 to Ext3, fine, but at least give us (Somewhere, even if it's only in Expert mode) the ability to at least use ReiserFS (since it is in the kernel, and unlike Ext3, is no longer marked 'experamental') and at best, both Reiser and XFS.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review - Filesystems

Anonymous's picture

YES! RedHat is a bit weak on filesystems. On SuSE, you have ReiserFS and JFS choice during installation.

VFAT supports only small disks, I couldnt format 54GB FAT32 partition on W2K, because of M$ policy and neither I could make it on RedHat although Fat32 knows much larger volumes.

Id like to see XFS support also, when I installed RedHat 7.2 I wanted to USE it, not to be recompiling kernel from morning till evening.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review - Filesystems

Anonymous's picture

SGI does put out a modified Red Hat installer for Red Hat Linux 7.2 that will allow you to create XFS partitions, install an XFS enabled kernel, and install all the XFS utilties. I 'm not sure how long it will be before there is an installer for Red Hat Linux 7.3, but the one for 7.2 is available at: ftp://oss.sgi.com/projects/xfs/download/Release-1.0.2/installer/i386/

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review - Filesystems

Anonymous's picture

I upgraded my / partition to reiserfs on Red Hat 7.1 and kernel 2.4.18. Not the easiest thing to do but it works fine.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review - Filesystems

Anonymous's picture

etx3 is not classed as beta n e more, an you would only notice the speed loss if your funning on a 486 or below, n e way, what if you lose power, you would like to manually have to fsck your corrupted partiton, or just have it reboot correctly, hmmm the latter i think is a much better option

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Finally!!!! -a good beta review. It inspires me to install 7.3 as soon as it comes out... Thank you for that article.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

What I want to know is whether such things as NTFS read support and Wheel Mice are supported by default (as with Mandrake).

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Yes. The wheel started working in 7.2 and it works great!

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

RH 7.2 recognized my wheel mouse automatically and it works fine, so I suspect 7.3 will too. NTFS is probably still a recompile-the kernel option. I think it's about time they made this a default, even though writing to NTFS partitions is still ominously marked "experimental".

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

I'd like to use Red Hat easy, without have to mount the floppy disk. Does it have this thing, like supermount on Mandrake 8.2?

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

I'd like to use Red Hat easy, without have to mount the floppy disk. Does it have this thing, like supermount on Mandrake 8.2?

Supermount is not usefull in RedHat. Both KDE and Gnome as their automounter programs that work exactly like supermount whit more fonctionalities like loading audio CD's.

Try it your self, you'll see!

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

Great Review!

It's nice to read a review that gets beyond the installation process. I hardly ever touch KDE, but this review gives me several reasons to consider upgrading and trying out 3.0.

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

KDE 3 is definately worth checking out

Re: Red Hat 7.3 beta: A Product Review

Anonymous's picture

If it aint broke, don't fix it...

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