Virtualization the Linux/OSS Way

VirtualBox often is called a “desktop” virtualization solution, but it's just as capable of being a server solution. And contrary to what you may believe, no GUI is required; you can manage it all from the command line.

If you get this script working, you are well on your way to having the infrastructure in place to support a manageable, flexible, cost-effective, robust virtualization environment. Personally, I'm looking forward to getting 3.2.x in place and being able to teleport running machines between hosts to manage workloads in real time—from the command line, of course. Stay tuned, my next article will deal with the back-end shared storage (based on open protocols and free, open-source software, while being redundant and performant). I intend to connect my virtualization hosts to support being able to:

VBoxManage controlvm vbox-vm-3 \
           teleport --host vbox-host-2 --port 17001

Greg Bledsoe is the Manager of Technical Operations for a standout VoIP startup, Aptela (www.aptela.com), an author, husband, father to six children, wine enthusiast, amateur philosopher and general know-it-all who welcomes your comments and criticism at lj@bledsoehome.net.

______________________

-- I was cloud before cloud was cool. Not in the sense of being an amorphous collection of loosely related molecules with indeterminate borders -- or maybe I am. Holla @geek_king, http://twitter.com/geek_king

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